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Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

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The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB.

The Raspberry Pi 4 is a very powerful single-board computer and starts at the usual price of $35. That gets you the standard 1GB RAM, or you can pay $45 for the 2GB model or $55 for the 4GB model—premium-priced models are a first for Raspberry Pi.

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The Raspberry Pi 4 brings faster CPU, up to 4GB of RAM

  • The Raspberry Pi 4 brings faster CPU, up to 4GB of RAM

    Today, Raspberry Pi is introducing a new version of its popular line of single-board computer. The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B is the fastest Raspberry Pi ever, with the company promising "desktop performance comparable to entry-level x86 PC systems."

    The new model is built around a Broadcom BCM2711 SoC, which, with four 1.5GHz Cortex A72 CPU cores, should be a big upgrade over the quad core Cortex A53 CPU in the Raspberry Pi 3. The RAM options are the even bigger upgrade though, with options for 1GB, 2GB, and even 4GB of DDR4. The Pi 3 was limited to 1GB of RAM, which really stung for desktop-class use cases.

Raspberry Pi 4 is a complete desktop computer for just $35

  • Raspberry Pi 4 is a complete desktop computer for just $35

    The Raspberry Pi was originally designed to provide an ultra-cheap way to encourage kids to code, but the uncased credit card sized computer has found an appreciative audience well outside of the education system, going on to sell over a million Pis in its first year alone. Each new iteration of the Pi has added something new, including a 64-bit processor, dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and Power over Ethernet (PoE) via a HAT.

    Today, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announces the Raspberry Pi 4, and it’s a game changer, offering three times the processing power and four times the multimedia performance of its predecessor, the Raspberry Pi 3+. And that’s not all.

Plenty More Coverage Today of Raspberry Pi 4

  • Raspberry Pi 4 announced and available - sounds like a pretty nice upgrade, Raspbian now based on Debian 10

    Not something we usually cover here, but it's a fun bit of hardware news. The Raspberry Pi 4 is now official and it's out and ready to pick up.

    Interestingly, they also overhauled their home-grown Raspbian Linux OS, as it's now based on Debian 10 Buster. To go along with this, their original graphics stack is being retired in favour of using the Mesa "V3D" driver developed by Eric Anholt at Broadcom. They say it has allowed them to remove "roughly half of the lines of closed-source code in the platform" which is a nice win.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Announced With Dual HDMI, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, V3D Driver Stack

    Managing to make it out today as a surprise is the Raspberry Pi 4. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a major overhaul and their most radical update yet while base pricing still starts out at $35 USD.

    First of all, the Raspberry Pi SoC now features a quad-core Cortex-A72 CPU that can clock up to 1.5GHz for offering around three times faster performance. This SoC is the Broadcom BCM2711. There are also three variants of the Raspberry Pi 4 to offer 1GB, 2GB or 4GB of system memory -- the 1GB version will be $35, 2GB at $45, and 4GB at $55. With the new Raspberry Pi 4 SoC they are also now making use of the modern Broadcom V3D open-source driver to offer much better OpenGL support and even Vulkan eventually. The Raspberry Pi 4 with its much better graphics/display setup can even drive two displays via micro-HDMI connections.

  • How to Cool Your Raspberry Pi

    If you're overclocking your Raspberry Pi, you might run into overheating problems. Fortunately, you can prevent this by adding sufficient cooling to your Pi

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Is Here With 4GB LPDDR4 RAM And Faster SoC

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has unveiled the Raspberry Pi 4 which is touted to be the fastest Raspberry Pi ever. The foundation promises a “complete desktop experience” with the upgrades it has included in the Raspberry Pi 4.

    Physically, you wouldn’t notice any difference as the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B looks similar to the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. However, you’ll feel the upgrades inside the hood as the latest Raspberry Pi edition comes packed with a faster SoC. The Raspberry Pi 4 now comes with a Cortex-A72 architecture (ARM v8) 64-bit SoC at 1.5Ghz.

  • Raspberry PI 4 Released – Complete specs and pricing

    new version of the Raspberry PI 4 model has been released, and it is incredible update over the older model. A few years ago, I got Raspberry Pi 3 . It was my first 64-bit ARM board. It came with a 64-bit CPU. Here are the complete specs for an updated 64-bit credit card size Raspberry PI 4 desktop computer level of performance.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Is Here – Buy Now

    Your Raspberry Pi 4 will be shipped with new Debian 10 based distro giving you cutting-edge applications, new features, and modern theme.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Model B announced

    We will release an image to support the device shortly. Our initial release will support software decoding only, although we will test the feasibility of backporting 4K (albeit SDR) decoding with Kodi v18.

    We plan to support 4K and HDR with Kodi Matrix (v19) builds which are expected to be released as a stable version by the end of 2020 / early 2021. Kodi is removing support for proprietary hardware decoding interfaces and for Linux the new method of hardware accelerated playback will be via V4L2/GBM. Development for this is still in early stages, and a number of important changes are expected to land in Linux kernel 5.2 at a minimum. Presently, the Pi 4 is supported on a 4.19 kernel, so it will be some time before all of the necessary support is there for hardware accelerated playback and features such as HD audio passthrough.

    The work on V4L2/GBM will be beneficial to other devices such as Vero 4K +, and will allow us to begin developing support for x86 devices in the near future as well.

    OSMC would like to thank the Raspberry Pi foundation for making test units available in advance of the release and for their continued support.

Official Raspberry Pi OS Updated with Raspberry Pi 4 Support

  • Official Raspberry Pi OS Updated with Raspberry Pi 4 Support, Based on Debian 10

    With the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 SBC series, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released a new version of Raspbian OS, the official Raspberry Pi operating system based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution. This release adds numerous new features and improvements, but the biggest change is that it supports the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single-board computer.

    Another major change in the new Raspbian OS release is that the entire operating system has been rebased on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, due for release next month on July 6th. This means that there are numerous updated components included in Raspbian 2019-06-20, along with lots of bug fixes and improvements.

The Raspberry Pi 4 original post

  • Raspberry Pi 4 on sale now from $35

    We have a surprise for you today: Raspberry Pi 4 is now on sale, starting at $35. This is a comprehensive upgrade, touching almost every element of the platform. For the first time we provide a PC-like level of performance for most users, while retaining the interfacing capabilities and hackability of the classic Raspberry Pi line.

Raspberry Pi 4 revealed

  • Raspberry Pi 4 revealed: It’s a massive upgrade for the same price

    The Raspberry Pi series is arguably responsible for accelerating the single-board computer sector, giving people a capable computing platform for a cheap price. Now, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced the Raspberry Pi 4, and it’s a big upgrade over the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

    The biggest Raspberry Pi 4 upgrade is arguably in the chipset (BCM2711), as we’ve now got four Cortex-A72 CPU cores. This is a massive step up from the Model B+, which offered power-sipping Cortex-A53 CPU cores. In fact, the foundation says you can expect a 3x performance boost over the old chipset. We also see a RAM upgrade from LPDDR2 to LPDDR4 with the new model.

$35 Raspberry Pi 4 could be your next computer

  • $35 Raspberry Pi 4 could be your next computer

    The Raspberry Pi 4 has just been announced by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The Raspberry Pi boards have been evolving quite nicely over the last few years and becoming more powerful along the way. This latest version has up to 4GB RAM, 4K dual displays, 1.5Ghz processor and USB 3.0. Instead of a Micro USB port for power like it’s predecessor, this model uses a USB Type-C port.

    We have the base Raspberry Pi 4 model for $35 that has 1GB LPDDR4 RAM, $45 gets you 2GB RAM, and $55 gets you 4GB onboard RAM. You have a faster CPU, GPU and faster Ethernet and dual-band Wi-Fi. It also has twice the amount of HDMI outputs than the previous model and two USB 3 ports. The HDMI ports can power two 4K monitors at 30 frames per second.

Latest News About Raspberry Pi 4

  • The Raspberry Pi 4 is Here — And It’s a BEAST!

    The Raspberry Pi 4 has arrived, albeit much sooner than anyone (even Raspberry Pi themselves) expected!

    But what an update it is.

    Sporting several major upgrades, the new Raspberry Pi 4 can claim to be the fastest and most versatile version of the single board computer yet. Better still, the price continues to start at same low $35/£35 entry point touted by earlier models.

    Read on to learn more about the Raspberry Pi 4 specs and new features, and to find out where you can buy a Raspberry Pi 4 for yourself.

  • With Upgraded Specs, Raspberry Pi 4 Takes Aim at Desktop Segment

    Raspberry Pi 4 is here with the upgraded technical specifications. You get up to 4 GB of RAM and you can connect two 4K displays with it. With the new hardware, you should be more comfortable using it as a desktop. Starting price remains the $35 like the previous models.

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has just launched the new Raspberry Pi 4 Model B.

    It comes with some impressive upgrades which makes one of the most powerful single board computers under $40.

  • Quad -A72 Raspberry Pi 4 finally gets its RAM

    The Raspberry Pi 4 has launched with a 1.5GHz quad-core, Cortex-A72 Broadcom SoC, up to 4GB RAM, native GbE, USB 3.0 and Type-C ports, and a second micro-HDMI for dual 4K displays.

    Eben Upton announced the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B as a “surprise,” which is generally true of any new Pi launch, but in even more so here. in February, the RPi Trading CEO hinted that the next Pi would not arrive until 2020. But here it is, checking off multiple wishlist items, including the biggest one: more RAM. Although you can buy a 1GB version for the same $35 price, there’s also a 2GB version for $45 and a 4GB model for $55, all with speedier LPDDR4 RAM.

  • 4 of the Best Lightweight Operating Systems for Raspberry Pi

    The Raspberry Pi is a super-affordable single board computer that be can be used for a variety of different projects. Some of the most popular uses of the Raspberry Pi are to turn it into a dedicated media player with OSMC or a videogame emulation machine with RetroPie or Recalbox. Given the versatility of the Raspberry Pi, some have wondered if it could replace a traditional desktop computer. While the Raspberry Pi has significant hardware limitations, the following lightweight operating systems certainly think so. Note: The Raspberry Pi has a number of different models on the market.

  • Latest Pi-top is a Raspberry Pi 4-based mini-PC

    Pi-top announced a “Pi-top [4]” mini-PC based on the new Raspberry Pi 4 with an integrated OLED display, a battery, and a dozen component modules ranging from sensor to potentiometers.

    Pi-top has preannounced its first mini-PC form factor Pi-top and the first Pi accessory to feature the new Raspberry Pi 4 Model B. Like its earlier, laptop style Pi-top models, the Pi-top [4] offers a hacking bay for connecting component modules to the Pi’s GPIO.

The Raspberry Pi 4 launch site runs on a Pi 4 cluster

Benchmarks available

  • Raspberry Pi 4B 32 Bit Benchmarks

    This report contains results of my numerous benchmarks run on the Raspberry Pi 4. In this case, they were 32 bit versions using Raspbian Buster Operating System. Existing benchmarks were used to provide comparisons with the old 3B+ model. The benchmarks were also recompiled using gcc 8, that came with Buster, to provide further comparisons. The early opportunity to run the programs was due to my acceptance of the request for me to become a volunteer consultant, exercising the system prior to launch.

Raspberry Pi 4 v 3B+: first hands-on review!

  • Raspberry Pi 4 v 3B+: first hands-on review! - Learning by Making

    Raspberry Pi stunned the computing world when they announced RPi4 in June 2019. Creative design company pi-top have had pre-release models for a while now. So in this first hands-on review, gadget fan Jason Bradbury and pi-top VP of Technology Wil Bennett, put the Raspberry Pi 4 through it paces in a series of tests against the 3B+. Here’s what’s changed… oh and TL;DR you should get one.
    As Raspberry Pi inventor and CEO, Eben Upton, said in an exclusive interview on pi-top’s podcast earlier this year, there are two types of RPi upgrades — evolution and revolution.

More Raspberry Pi 4

Raspberry Pi 4 Benchmarks & Mini Review

Run Kodi on Raspberry Pi 4 with Linux-based LibreELEC

  • Run Kodi on Raspberry Pi 4 with Linux-based LibreELEC (Leia) 9.2 ALPHA1

    While some folks use Raspberry Pi devices for tinkering, creating, and other geeky projects, many others simply use it for media playback. You see, thanks to the Linux-based LibreELEC operating system, you can easily run the Kodi media center on the tiny computer. Believe it or not, LibreELEC runs very well on Pi computers too -- it is a solid media consumption experience.

    Yesterday, the Raspberry Pi 4 was announced with better specs and new ports, such as dual micro-HDMI which are capable of 4K video! You can even opt for up to 4GB of RAM -- quadruple what was previously available. Understandably, Kodi users were drooling over the possibility of running LibreELEC on the Raspberry Pi 4. Well, good news -- there is already an alpha build of the Linux distro for the newest Pi.

Next-Gen Raspberry Pi 4 Packs Power Plus Potential

  • Next-Gen Raspberry Pi 4 Packs Power Plus Potential

    The next big Raspberry Pi thing is now here, with lots more computing power and more options.

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation on Monday announced the availability of Raspberry Pi 4, a comprehensive upgrade that touches nearly every element of the computing platform.

    Raspberry Pi 4 offers users a choice of three memory capacities. The entry-level 1 GB RAM retains the signature US$35 price; 2 GB costs $45; 4 GB sells for $55. Prices exclude sales tax, import duty (where appropriate) and shipping.

Raspberry Pi 4 Is Here

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Is Here

    The new model has the same form factor and pricing. Yes! It’s still being sold for $35. But it has everything else improved. Pi 4 features a 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU running at 1.5Ghz. Now you can get up to 4GB of LPDDR4 SDRAM and full-throughput Gigabit Ethernet. It has two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports. You can now connect two monitors running at 4K resolution. It also has 4Kp60 hardware decode of HEVC video. Instead of using the old micro-USB for power, it’s now using USB-C.

Raspberry Pi users: You got Pi 4

The reason for jumping ahead of the official release date is the Raspberry Pi 4. The Raspberry Pi Foundation unveiled the new computer this week, which for the first time is available with three different memory capacities.

It still starts at $35 for the 1GB model, but will also be available 2GB of RAM for $45 and 4GB of RAM for $55. There's also dual-screen support.

Unlike previous models, the Raspberry Pi 4 uses the open-source OpenGL video driver by default, which is supported in Debian Buster.

"It would have been a lot of work to port everything required for it back on to Raspbian Stretch, so we decided that we would launch on Raspbian Buster – the only question was whether Buster would be ready before the hardware was," said Simon Long, a senior principal software engineer for the foundation.

"The official launch date for Buster is July 7, so we are a couple of weeks ahead. That said, Buster has been in a 'frozen' state for a couple of months now, with only minor changes being made to it, so the version we are releasing is pretty much identical to that which will be officially released by Debian on July 7."

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Late Coverage by Liliputing's Brad Linder

  • New Raspberry Pi, new Raspbian operating system

    The Raspberry Pi 4 is now available for purchase for $35 and up and along with a faster processor, support for dual dual displays and options for 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB of RAM, the new single-board computer is getting a new GNU/Linux distribution.

    While the Raspberry Pi can run a variety of operating systems, the Debian-based Raspbian operating system is the version officially supported by the folks at the Raspberry Pi foundation. And the latest version includes support for a new open source OpenGL video driver, security updates, and a simpler user interface.

Raspbian Buster

  • Buster – the new version of Raspbian

    Amid all the furore about the release of a certain new piece of hardware, some people may have missed that we have also released a new version of Raspbian. While this is required for Raspberry Pi 4, we’ve always tried to maintain software backwards-compatibility with older hardware, and so the standard Raspbian image for all models of Raspberry Pi is now based on Buster, the latest version of Debian Linux.

  • Raspberry Pi 4: Raspbian ‘Buster’ interview

    The launch of Raspberry Pi 4 brings not only new hardware but new software too: Raspbian ‘Buster’, a brand-new release – compatible, as always, with every Raspberry Pi model going right back to the pre-launch Alpha design – with a revamped, flatter user interface based on the upstream Debian ‘Buster’ Linux distribution.

    Simon Long explains: “Due to the lack of obvious differences between Buster and Stretch, I wanted to do something to make it a bit more obvious that people actually had something new,” of his new interface design. When we moved from Jessie to Stretch, there was a similar lack of major differences, and people wondered whether or not they actually had the new version – I wanted to avoid that this time. Also, the overall UI design in terms of the appearance of buttons, controls, and the like really hasn’t changed significantly in the time I’ve been here – there have been some small tweaks, but it felt time for a change.”

  • Upgrade Your Raspberry Pi to Raspbian Buster, Without Losing Data

    While it was the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 that snagged all the headlines this week, it wasn't the only new product to come out of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The not-for-profit also released a new version of its Raspbian Linux distribution, dubbed 'Buster.' You need Buster to run Raspberry Pi 4, but it also works on and improves the experience for any older Raspberry Pi.

How to use your Raspberry Pi as a VPN server

  • How to use your Raspberry Pi as a VPN server

    In 2019, is there anything that the mighty, $35, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer can't do? It seems there isn't; recent Raspberry Pi projects include a functional smartphone, a computer vision kit, and even a movie projector for a more traditional home theater experience.

    A Raspberry Pi (RPi) can even be turned into a server for virtual private networking (VPN). One of the many things you can tinker with on an RPi is data communications; this is one reason why they are often called "Swiss Army knives for hackers"—and not necessarily the malicious kind.

    RPis can function as servers for many projects, and if you have more than one personal computing device on a personal network, the RPi can be put to work as a dedicated server. From Minecraft servers to website hosts to IRC to network printing operations, many of these projects involve a series of software installation and configuration steps, as is the case for the RPi VPN server you'll build in this tutorial.

Install and Use Docker on Raspberry Pi

  • Install and Use Docker on Raspberry Pi

    Docker is a containerization platform that allows you to quickly build, test and deploy applications as portable, self-sufficient containers that can virtually run everywhere. In this tutorial, we will explain how to install Docker on Raspberry Pi and explore the basic Docker concepts and commands.

Raspberry Pi Beginner's Guide updated for Raspberry Pi 4

Updates from Raspberrypi-land

  • Updates from Raspberrypi-land

    I was feeling sad and depressed because it's already late June... And I had not had enough time to get the unofficial Debian Buster Raspberry preview images booting on the entry-level models of the family (Broadcom 2835-based Raspberries 1A, 1B, 0 and 0W). But, this morning I found a very interesting pull request open in our GitHub repository!

    Dispatched some piled-up work, and set an image build. Some minutes later, I had a shiny image, raspi0w.tar.gz. Quickly fired up dd to prepare an SD card. Searched for my RPi0w under too many papers until I found it.

Raspberry Pi 4: This thing is a PC, says board's creator

  • Raspberry Pi 4: This thing is a PC, says board's creator Eben Upton

    The new Raspberry Pi 4 Model B is out today, and sees the low-cost computer transformed into a far more capable machine.

    Based around a new hardware platform, the new board packs in up to 4GB memory, USB 3.0, dual 4K display support, and a faster and newer CPU and GPU.

    If you're interested in what the new board can do and how it compares to earlier Raspberry Pi computers, check out our review and benchmarks or our guided tour of the new board .

    The Pi 4 has been three years in the making and arrives one year earlier than anyone expected.

    We spoke to Eben Upton, co-creator of the Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi Trading CEO, about the decisions that shaped the Raspberry Pi 4 and what new uses it opens up for the Pi.

Brian Fagioli obviously and maybe knowingly exaggerating

  • Don't buy the faulty Raspberry Pi 4 -- get a different Linux-compatible single-board computer instead

    Raspberry Pi computers are pretty damn great. Not only are they small and inexpensive, but they are ideal for tinkering and learning. And yes, they can serve as excellent media boxes thanks to the Linux-based LibreELEC. With the Raspberry Pi 4, however, it is finally powerful enough to serve as a true desktop computer -- prior models were capable, but offered woefully slow desktop experiences.

    With all of that said, surely the Raspberry Pi 4 is highly recommended, right? Actually no. Sadly, we must warn you not to buy this seemingly solid piece of hardware. Unfortunately, it has one massive faulty aspect, meaning you should probably pass on it.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers. Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks. Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration. Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices. Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

Releasing Slax 9.11.0

New school year has started again and next version of Slax is here too :) this time it is 9.11.0. This release includes all bug fixes and security updates from Debian 9.11 (code name Jessie), and adds a boot parameter to disable console blanking (console blanking is disabled by default). You can get the newest version at the project's home page, there are options to purchase Slax on DVD or USB device, as well as links for free download. Surprisingly for me we skipped 9.10, I am not sure why :) I also experimented with the newly released series of Debian 10 (code name Buster) and noticed several differences which need addressing, so Slax based on Debian 10 is in progress, but not ready yet. Considering my current workload and other circumstances, it will take some more time to get it ready, few weeks at least. Read more Also: Slax 9.11 Released While Re-Base To Debian 10 Is In Development

today's howtos

KDE Frameworks 5.62.0 and Reports From Akademy 2019 in Milan

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62.0

    KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.62 Released With KWayland Additions & Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.62 is out today as the latest monthly update to this collection of KDE libraries complementing the Qt5 tool-kit offerings.

  • Back from Akademy 2019 in Milan

    The last week I was in Milan with my wife Aiswarya to attend Akademy 2019, the yearly event of the KDE community. Once again it was a great experience, with lots of interesting conferences and productive BoF sessions (“Birds of a Feather”, a common name for a project meeting during a conference). On Sunday, we presented our talk “GCompris in Kerala, part 2”. First, Aiswarya told some bits of Free-Software history in Kerala, gave examples of how GCompris is used there, and explained her work to localize the new version of GCompris in Malayalam (the language of this Indian state). Then I made a quick report of what happened in GCompris the last 2 years, and talked about the things to come for our next release.

  • Akademy was a blast!

    I attended my first ever Akademy! The event was held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy this year. And the experience was splendid. During the 2 day conference, I had the opportunity to talk at the Student Showcase, where all of the SoC students presented their work to the community. There were about 8 students, and everyone gave a good briefing on their project. My project this summer was with Kdenlive, the open source non linear professional video editor. I proposed to revamp one of the frequently used tools in the editor, called the Titler tool, which is used to create title clips. Title clips are video clips that contain text and/or images that are composited or appended to your video (eg: subtitles). The problem with the titler tool as it is, is that it uses QGraphicsView to describe a title clip and QGraphicsView was deprecated since the release of Qt5. This obviously leads to problems - upstream bugs crawling affecting the functionality of the tool and an overall degradation in the ease of maintenance of the codebase. Moreover, adding new features to the existing code base was no easy task and therefore, a complete revamp was something in sights of the developer community in Kdenlive for a long time now. I proposed to rework on the backend for the period of GSoC replacing the use of XML with QML and use a new rendering backend with QQuickRenderControl, along with a new MLT module to handle the QML frames. I was able to cover most of the proposed work, I seek to continue working on it and finish evolving the titler tool.