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Canonical/Ubuntu: StarLabs’ Theme, Snap Store, 32-bit i386 Packages and More

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Ubuntu
  • Give Ubuntu an Electric-Blue Look with StarLabs’ Theme

    Fancy giving your Ubuntu desktop a dark, electric-blue makeover? If so, then Linux laptop seller StarLabs has you covered.

    The company (who I’l admit I hadn’t heard of until recently) joins a surfeit of British-based Linux laptop vendors, with StationX and the (fabulous) Entroware being the best known.

    But we’re not here to talk about systems, we’re here to talk themes!

    See, aside from selling a small range of (seemingly decent) laptops preloaded with a selection of Ubuntu-based Linux distributions, StarLabs also maintain their own theme.

    And i’m going to show you how to install it Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu Has Started Work On A New Desktop Snap Store

    Ubuntu's software stores / software centers have gone through several revisions over the years and now a new Snap Store is in development.

    Developers at Canonical have begun committing to a new Snap Desktop Store. The first code commits were only last week, so it's not yet something for end-users to get all excited about but presumably they'll be aiming for it to be in good shape by next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 drops 32-bit images, pledges to maintain some packages after user outcry

    Ubuntu 19.10 is scheduled for release in October, though controversy is already brewing following Canonical's abjectly poorly-communicated plans to stop providing new 32-bit x86 (i386) packages in new Ubuntu releases. This move will prevent users from installing Ubuntu on older computers, and using certain applications only provided in 32-bit versions.

    In fairness to Canonical, the first x86-64 processors will be 16 years old when Ubuntu 19.10 is released, and this is a reckoning that other Linux distributions—as well as Windows and Mac OS—will eventually face, as the amount of engineering time needed to protract legacy platform support is approaching the negative end of a cost-benefit analysis.

  • Ubuntu Will Provide Select 32-bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 And 20.04 LTS

    As a result of constant feedback from the open source community — specifically gamers, WINE users, and Ubuntu Studio users — Canonical has decided to change its plans regarding ditching the 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS.

    For those who don’t know, last week, Canonical announced that it’s going to completely abandon the support for i386 architectures in the Ubuntu 19.10 release. Due to the same reason, Canonical restricted the users from upgrading their 18.04 LTS installations to 18.10, so that they don’t end up running 32-bit applications on an interim release with just nine months of support.

  • The future of mobile connectivity

    Mobile operators face a range of challenges today from saturation, competition and regulation – all of which are having a negative impact on revenues. The introduction of 5G offers new customer segments and services to offset this decline. However, unlike the introduction of 4G which was dominated by consumer benefits, 5G is expected to be driven by enterprise use. According to IDC, enterprises will generate 60 percent of the world’s data by 2025.

    Rather than rely on costly proprietary hardware and operating models, the use of open source technologies offers the ability to commoditise and democratise the wireless network infrastructure. Major operators such as Vodafone, Telefonica and China Mobile have already adopted such practices.

    Shifting to open source technology and taking a software defined approach enables mobile operators to differentiate based on the services they offer, rather than network coverage or subscription costs.

  • Design and Web team summary – 25 June 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

More in Tux Machines

PCLinuxOS KDE Darkstar 2019.07 Release

I am pleased to announce the July 2019 release of the PClinuxOS KDE Darkstar is ready for download. Read more

Crostini/Google Update

  • Acer Chromebook R 13

    It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until September 2021.

  • HP Chromebook x360 14

    It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until June 2024.

  • Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 78

    Back in March, I reported on an effort that would enable resizing of the Linux partition for Crostini-supported Chromebooks. At that time, I expected the feature to land in Chrome OS 75. I’ve checked for the feature now that Chrome OS 75 is available (again) and it’s nowhere to be seen. That’s because it was recently pushed back to Chrome OS 78. [...] However, other aspects need to be considered: Storage of large media files, for example, or enabling Google Drive synchronization with the Chrome OS Files app for offline file access. And then there are Android apps, so of which – particularly games – can require one or two gigabytes of space. So far, I haven’t run into any storage issues on my Pixel Slate with 128 GB of data capacity. But it’s easy to see that the Linux container is using up the bulk of my tablet’s storage: As I understand it, /dev/vdb is the Crostini container with Linux, which is 88 GB in size with 58 GB free.

Software: Maestral, GLava and Pitivi

  • Maestral Is A New Open Source Dropbox Client For Linux And macOS

    Maestral is a new open source Dropbox client for macOS and Linux, that's currently in beta. It can be used both with and without a GUI, and it was created with the purpose of having a Dropbox client that supports folder syncing to drives which use filesystems like Btrfs, Ext3, ZFS, XFS or encrypted filesystems, which are no longer supported by Dropbox.

  • GLava – OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for desktop windows or backgrounds

    Over the past few months, I’ve written lots of reviews of open source audio software, focusing mainly on music players. Linux has a mouthwatering array of open source multimedia tools, so I’m going to turn my attention wider afield from music players. Let’s start with some multimedia candy. GLava is an OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for Linux. An audio visualizer works by extracting waveform and/or frequency information from the audio and feeds this information through some display rules, which produces what you see on the screen. The imagery is usually generated and rendered in real time and in a way synchronized with the music as it is played. GLava makes a real-time audio visualizer appear as if it’s embedded in your desktop background, or in a window. When displayed as the background, it’ll display on top of your wallpaper, giving the appearance of a live, animated wallpaper. GLava is a simple C program that sets up the necessary OpenGL and Xlib code for sets of 2D fragment shaders. The software uses PulseAudio to sync the desktop visualizer with any music source.

  • Millan Castro: GSoC: First month working in Pitivi

    Pitivi is a video editor, free and open source. Targeted at newcomers and professional users, it is minimalist and powerful. This summer I am fortunate to collaborate in Pitivi development through Google Summer of Code. My goal is to implement an interval time system, with the support of Mathieu Duponchell, my menthor, and other members of the Pitivi community. An interval time system is a common tool in many video editors. It will introduce new features in Pitivi. The user will be able to set up a range of time in the timeline editor, playback specific parts of the timeline, export the selected parts of the timeline, cut or copy clips inside the interval and zoom in/out the interval. Mi proposal also includes the design of a marker system to store information at a certain time position.

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