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GSoC Work on KDE and GNOME, Epiphany Version Numbers

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GNOME
  • Week 4, Titler Tool and MLT – GSoC ’19

    It’s already been a month now, and this week – it hasn’t been the most exciting one. Mostly meddling with MLT, going through pages of documentation, compiling MLT and getting used to the MLT codebase.

    With the last week, I concluded with the rendering library part and now this week, I began writing a new producer in MLT for QML which will be rendered using the renderering library. So I went through a lot of MLT documentation, and it being a relatively new field for me, here is what I’ve gathered so far:

    At its core, MLT employs the basic producer-consumer concept. A producer produces data (here, frame objects) and a consumer consumes frames – as simple as that.

  • [Older] The Journey Begins | Google Summer of Code

    Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development. Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.

  • Making the 'httpsrc' plugin asynchronous | GSoC 2019

    GStreamer plugins are the building units of any GStreamer application. The plugins can be linked and arranged in a pipeline. This pipeline defines the flow of the data. 'souphttpsrc', aka HTTP source is a plugin which reads data from a remote location specified by a URI and the supported protocols are 'http', 'https'. This plugin is written in C. 'rshttpsrc' is the Rust version of the above said plugin.

  • Michael Catanzaro: On Version Numbers

    I’m afraid 3.33.4 will arrive long before we make it to 3.33.3-333, so this is probably the last cool version number Epiphany will ever have.

    I might be guilty of using an empty commit to claim the -33 commit.

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