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Introducing Mustang Linux & Screenshots

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Linux

Mustang Linux is a brand new entry in the small Linux distribution field. It aims to provide a simple (single mini) CD based Linux end-user client. The system boots from CD and loads the base operating system into a RAM image. No hard drive required. Uses 168MB of RAMDISK and needs a 586 system or higher with at least 256MB of RAM. Most base packages are from Slackware. The kernel is the latest 2.6.16.19 compiled with nearly all network cards and options.

Also supports read/write to NTFS (Windows 2000 and XP) hard drives. This allows the creation of a 'file-based' filesystem for customization and adding software packages. Provided on CD are extra packages such as Ted, Firefox-2.0, CUPS printing, etc. It is designed to fit on a mini-CD (<200MB) and to provide a basic Web services and email (sylpheed).

Mustang Linux is a concept test for a pocket-sized carry anywhere OS that is impervious to virus problems. Future concepts include providing broadband Internet services that will integrate additional software as requested by the user. Also customised versions to individual taste.

Information taken from the Mustang Linux Website.

Mustang is a lightweight compact fork or extension of Buffalo Linux.

interesting, yet somehow familiar

This sounds a bit like Puppy Linux. Can someone explain how it differs, if it differs?

re: Mustang Linux

Just what the world needs, another tiny Linux Distro. I'm sure the differences between it and the existing players (DSL, Puppy, Feather, etc) will be outstanding and practically overwhelming.

//golf clap//

Puppy is its own creation, actually

Puppy actually was never truly Slack or Vector-based. Applications were compiled in Vector (actually first in Mandrake, if I recall correctly) because there were no compilation tools available in Puppy itself. Now there are.

My question about the similarity had more to do with the inner workings than the applications that are included. Mustang sounds like it creates a file on an existing hard drive partition that houses your installed applications and other setting, much the same as Puppy (and DSL?) does.

Feather, as I recall, ran in RAM, but you could not install additional applications unless you installed the distro to the hard drive. Mustang sounds more like Puppy and DSL in this regard.

However, I guess my underlying question is how will/does Mustang distinguish itself from Puppy and DSL?

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