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Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols on Microsoft Gaining Greater Control Over Linux

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft asks to join private Linux security developer list

    All of which makes good sense. Besides, Levin revealed in a follow-up note to the discussion that: "the Linux usage on our cloud has surpassed Windows, as a by-product of that MSRC has started receiving security reports of issues with Linux code both from users and vendors. It's also the case that issues that are common for Windows and Linux (like those speculative hardware bugs)."

    Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux stable branch kernel maintainer, vouched for Levin. "He is a long-time kernel developer and has been helping with the stable kernel releases for a few years now, with full write permissions to the stable kernel trees."

    Indeed, Kroah-Hartman had "suggested that Microsoft join linux-distros a year or so ago when it became evident that they were becoming a Linux distro, and it is good to see that they are now doing so".

  • Microsoft developer reveals Linux is now more used on Azure than Windows Server

    It's now a Linux world -- even at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington.

Passing it on

Linux’s success in servers could pose problems

  • Linux’s success in servers could pose problems for the Linux desktop

    The cat is out of the bag and Steve Ballmer’s worst nightmare has just come true. Microsoft, once the most outspoken enemy of Linux and open source software, not only loves it but may have just become dependent on it. Its cloud computing platform Azure has long offered customers the choice between Linux and Windows virtual machines.

    Now a Microsoft engineer has just admitted that Azure customers have preferred using Linux instead of Windows servers. But what is a clear win for Linux in this market could also negatively affect other aspects of the operating system, most especially “The Linux Desktop” everyone loves talking about.

    [...]

    This is just the latest in a string of wins for Linux, though. All around the world, governments and institutions are switching to Linux due to the steep licensing fees Microsoft demands from customers.

    More than just saving on money, which is always an important consideration for this class of users, the situation has also caused the to reevaluate their use of proprietary software that often leaves them locked out when a vendor like Microsoft decides to discontinue certain versions or ask them to pay more.

Windows sites on Azure

  • Linux is more popular on Azure than Windows Server

    It seems that to anybody’s surprise, Linux is now more used on Azure than Windows Server. Despite Microsoft winning the OS battle a long time ago, Linux found its spot on the server side of the computing world.

Microsoft boosters "love Linux" when it's actually Azure

Microsoft boosters "love Linux" when it's actually Vista 10

More from Microsoft PR sites

  • Linux usage share surpasses usage share of Windows Server on Azure

    Usage of Linux on Microsoft Azure has grown exponentially over the past few years, and finally, it has managed to beat the usage share of Windows Server on the Cloud platform. Microsoft Linux developer confirmed saying, “The Linux usage on our cloud has surpassed Windows[Server].”

    This didn’t happen overnight. “One in four [Azure] instances are Linux,” said Azure CTO Mark Russinovich back in 2016. Which means roughly 25 percent instances were Linux and grew to nearly 50 percent back in 2018.

Microsoft Says Linux Surpassed Windows on Azure

  • Microsoft Says Linux Surpassed Windows on Azure [Ed: Microsoft boosters such as Bogdan Popa keep pushing that "Microsoft loves Linux" lie because they know that this lie is actually useful to Microsoft and contributes to brand dilution]

    “Microsoft loves Linux” is something that we hear every once in a while, especially from Microsofties who try to get the software giant more involved into this world that they once hated.

"[Microsoft] Azure is better for it" (caging Linux)

  • Linux is now beating Windows on Microsoft’s own turf, and Azure is better for it

    A Linux kernel developer working with Microsoft has let slip that Linux-based operating systems have a larger presence on Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform than Windows-based ones. The revelation appeared on an Openwall open-source security list in an application for Microsoft developers to join the list, and was apparently part of an evidently credible argument that Microsoft plays an active-enough role in Linux development to merit including the company in security groups.

"Microsoft Isn’t Worried'

Stealing the narrative

Microsoft loves taking over Linux

ZDNet again

Pushing the lie that Microsoft now "loves Linux"

  • Linux overtakes Windows Server as most used operating system on Azure [Ed: All the Microsoft sites keep pushing the lie that Microsoft now "loves Linux"; it would love to dominate it, no doubt, but this isn't love.]

    It’s definitely nice to see Microsoft play ball with open source software, which can be especially useful as innovations such as AI, IoT, and 5G gradually become mainstream. What do you think about the growth of Linux, especially on Microsoft’s own Azure?

Azure DevOps report

  • Azure DevOps report: How a bug caused ‘sqlite3 for Python’ to go missing from Linux images [Ed: Microsoft keeps breaking GNU/Linux. Here's an older example]

    Yesterday, Youhana Naseim the Group Engineering Manager at Azure Pipelines provided a post-mortem of the bug, due to which a sqlite3 module in the Ubuntu 16.04 image for Python went missing from May 14th.

    The Azure DevOps team identified the bug on May 31st and fixed it on June 26th. Naseim apologized to all the affected customers for the delay in detecting and fixing the issue.

CBS Again

Swapnil's Piece

  • Confirmed: Microsoft Will Join The Private Linux Kernel Mailing List [Ed: Swapnil became a Microsoft propagandist. A few paragraphs down he repeats marketing points of the company.]

    However, it wasn’t all praise. Levin had to prove to the community whether it qualifies to join the list or not. After a long and quite intensive discussion, it all but certain that Microsoft will be accepted into the mailing list, possibly, by the end of this week.

Microsoft admitted to private Linux developer security list

  • Microsoft admitted to private Linux developer security list [Ed: Little by little, Microsoft seizes greater control over its competition]

    Most open-source development work, like the name says, is done in the open. The exception is the first stages of security work. Unpatched security holes, however, are discussed and fixed behind closed doors. Now, Microsoft has been admitted to the closed linux-distro list.

    Microsoft wanted in because, while Windows sure isn't Linux, the company is, in fact, a Linux distributor. Sasha Levin, a Microsoft Linux kernel developer, pointed out Microsoft has several distro-like builds -- which are not derivative of an existing distribution -- that are based on open-source components.

Linux Based Operating Systems Beat Their Windows Counterparts

  • Linux Based Operating Systems Beat Their Windows Counterparts On Microsoft’s Azure Cloud Platform

    In what sounds surprising, a Linux Kernel Developer who has been working with Microsoft has revealed that Microsoft’s Azure Cloud platform has more number of Linux-based operating systems than the Windows-based operating systems. The details came up on an Openwall Open-source Security List which had an application urging Microsoft developers to join the list. The Security list left open an argument that Microsoft plays a key role in Linux development.

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