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Mageia Magical (lucky?) release number 7 has arrived

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Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. We all hope that the release works as well for you as it has during our testing and development.

There are lots of new features, exciting updates, and new versions of your favorite programs, as well as support for very recent hardware. The release is available to download directly, or as a torrent from here.

There are classical installer images for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, as well as live DVD’s for 64-bit Plasma, GNOME, Xfce, and 32-bit Xfce.

Read more

Also: Mageia 7 Sets Sail With Linux 5.1, KDE Plasma 5.15.4 Desktop

LWN's turn

: Softpedia News (Marius Nestor) on this release

  • Mageia 7 Linux OS Released with Linux 5.1 Kernel, KDE Plasma 5.15 and GNOME 3.32

    The Mageia community has released today the Mageia 7 Linux operating system, a major version that brings up-to-date components and several new features for fans of this Mandriva derivative.

    Almost two years in the work, the Mageia 7 Linux operating system is now available to download and comes packed with numerous of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software. Mageia 7 is powered by one of the most recent kernels from the Linux 5.1 series and features the latest Mesa 19.1 graphics stack.

    Mageia 7 also features a wide range of desktop environments and window managers, but it's shipped in three main editions with the KDE Plasma 5.15.4, GNOME 3.32, and Xfce 4.14pre desktops. Support for Wayland and hybrid graphics cards has been enhanced as well in Mageia 7, which comes with an extended collection of games.

Brian Fagioli's article: Mageia 7 Linux distro available

  • Mageia 7 Linux distro available for download

    Today is the first day of the seventh month -- July. This month is special to Americans, as we celebrate our independence from the treacherous British on July the fourth.

    With that said, it is quite appropriate that Mageia 7 -- a high-quality Linux distribution -- is released today. You see, it is interesting to have the seventh major version of the operating system become available for download on 7/1. But also, it is significant because, just like America declared its independence, so too can Windows users by switching to this excellent Linux distro.

Mageia 7 Released with Plasma 5.15, Linux 5.1 & More

  • Mageia 7 Released with Plasma 5.15, Linux 5.1 & More

    If you fancy sampling a Linux distro that’s not based on Ubuntu, check out the new Mageia 7 release, now available for download.

    Mageia 7 arrives two years after the release of Mageia 6 and is packed full of the latest Linux software, utilities and desktop environments.

    “Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. We all hope that the release works as well for you as it has during our testing and development,” writes Mageia’s Donald Stewart on the project blog.

    A RPM-based Linux distribution, Mageia is a fork of Mandriva, which was a mildly popular Linux distro that shut up shop in 2011.

New Review (Video)

  • Mageia 7

    Today we are looking at Mageia 7, which is released 2 years after Mageia 6, and it is worth the wait. As we got to know and love of Mageia, it is still filled with all it's great tools and documentation, yet they smoothed it out to make it more streamlined and organized which is amazing. Mageia 7 comes with KDE Plasma 5.15 and Gnome 3.32 with Linux Kernel 5.1. The Plasma edition uses about 500Mof Ram when idling.

Video - Direct

LJ: "Mageia 7 Now Available"

Belated Slashdot coverage

  • Mageia 7 Linux Distro Released

    If you're looking to try out a Linux distro that is not based on Ubuntu, Mageia 7 might be worth your consideration. It arrives two years after the release of Mageia 6 -- so unsurprisingly, the changelog is fairly long. The Mageia developers share the significant packages that have been updated below. Significant package updates include: kernel 5.1.14, rpm 4.14.2, dnf 4.2.6, Mesa 19.1, Plasma 5.15.4, GNOME 3.32, Xfce 4.14pre, Firefox 67, Chromium 73, and LibreOffice 6.2.3.

Mageia 7 is Released

  • Mageia 7 is Released, Which comes with lots of new Features, Exciting Updates and Support Latest Hardware

    Donald Stewart has announced the release of Mageia 7 on July 01, 2019. Mageia 7 comes with lots of new features, exciting updates and support latest hardware.

    It will be supported with security and bug fix updates for 18 months, up to 2020.

    It support both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, as well as live DVD’s for 64-bit Plasma, GNOME, Xfce, and 32-bit Xfce. Also, you can install other desktops too.

    It’s offering variety of desktops and window managers, improved support for Wayland and for hybrid graphics cards. Also added many games collections.

    A good progress made on ARM support: aarch64 and ARMv7 but this still being experimental stage.

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Debian Community Team (CT) and miniDebConf19 Vaumarcu

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Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3
    So we've had a fairly quiet last week, but I think it was good that we
    ended up having that extra week and the final rc8.
    
    Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather
    than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in,
    including some for some bad btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some
    unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also
    had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues.
    
    One _particularly_ last-minute revert is the top-most commit (ignoring
    the version change itself) done just before the release, and while
    it's very annoying, it's perhaps also instructive.
    
    What's instructive about it is that I reverted a commit that wasn't
    actually buggy. In fact, it was doing exactly what it set out to do,
    and did it very well. In fact it did it _so_ well that the much
    improved IO patterns it caused then ended up revealing a user-visible
    regression due to a real bug in a completely unrelated area.
    
    The actual details of that regression are not the reason I point that
    revert out as instructive, though. It's more that it's an instructive
    example of what counts as a regression, and what the whole "no
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    API's, and it didn't introduce any new bugs. But it ended up exposing
    another problem, and as such caused a kernel upgrade to fail for a
    user. So it got reverted.
    
    The point here being that we revert based on user-reported _behavior_,
    not based on some "it changes the ABI" or "it caused a bug" concept.
    The problem was really pre-existing, and it just didn't happen to
    trigger before. The better IO patterns introduced by the change just
    happened to expose an old bug, and people had grown to depend on the
    previously benign behavior of that old issue.
    
    And never fear, we'll re-introduce the fix that improved on the IO
    patterns once we've decided just how to handle the fact that we had a
    bad interaction with an interface that people had then just happened
    to rely on incidental behavior for before. It's just that we'll have
    to hash through how to do that (there are no less than three different
    patches by three different developers being discussed, and there might
    be more coming...). In the meantime, I reverted the thing that exposed
    the problem to users for this release, even if I hope it will be
    re-introduced (perhaps even backported as a stable patch) once we have
    consensus about the issue it exposed.
    
    Take-away from the whole thing: it's not about whether you change the
    kernel-userspace ABI, or fix a bug, or about whether the old code
    "should never have worked in the first place". It's about whether
    something breaks existing users' workflow.
    
    Anyway, that was my little aside on the whole regression thing.  Since
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    worth just bringing it up every once in a while.
    
    Other than that aside, I don't find a lot to really talk about last
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    selftests. And a few random fixes in various other corners. The
    appended shortlog is not overly long, and gives a flavor for the
    changes.
    
    And this obviously means that the merge window for 5.4 is open, and
    I'll start doing pull requests for that tomorrow. I already have a
    number of them in my inbox, and I appreciate all the people who got
    that over and done with early,
    
                    Linus
    
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