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Mageia Magical (lucky?) release number 7 has arrived

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Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. We all hope that the release works as well for you as it has during our testing and development.

There are lots of new features, exciting updates, and new versions of your favorite programs, as well as support for very recent hardware. The release is available to download directly, or as a torrent from here.

There are classical installer images for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, as well as live DVD’s for 64-bit Plasma, GNOME, Xfce, and 32-bit Xfce.

Read more

Also: Mageia 7 Sets Sail With Linux 5.1, KDE Plasma 5.15.4 Desktop

LWN's turn

: Softpedia News (Marius Nestor) on this release

  • Mageia 7 Linux OS Released with Linux 5.1 Kernel, KDE Plasma 5.15 and GNOME 3.32

    The Mageia community has released today the Mageia 7 Linux operating system, a major version that brings up-to-date components and several new features for fans of this Mandriva derivative.

    Almost two years in the work, the Mageia 7 Linux operating system is now available to download and comes packed with numerous of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software. Mageia 7 is powered by one of the most recent kernels from the Linux 5.1 series and features the latest Mesa 19.1 graphics stack.

    Mageia 7 also features a wide range of desktop environments and window managers, but it's shipped in three main editions with the KDE Plasma 5.15.4, GNOME 3.32, and Xfce 4.14pre desktops. Support for Wayland and hybrid graphics cards has been enhanced as well in Mageia 7, which comes with an extended collection of games.

Brian Fagioli's article: Mageia 7 Linux distro available

  • Mageia 7 Linux distro available for download

    Today is the first day of the seventh month -- July. This month is special to Americans, as we celebrate our independence from the treacherous British on July the fourth.

    With that said, it is quite appropriate that Mageia 7 -- a high-quality Linux distribution -- is released today. You see, it is interesting to have the seventh major version of the operating system become available for download on 7/1. But also, it is significant because, just like America declared its independence, so too can Windows users by switching to this excellent Linux distro.

Mageia 7 Released with Plasma 5.15, Linux 5.1 & More

  • Mageia 7 Released with Plasma 5.15, Linux 5.1 & More

    If you fancy sampling a Linux distro that’s not based on Ubuntu, check out the new Mageia 7 release, now available for download.

    Mageia 7 arrives two years after the release of Mageia 6 and is packed full of the latest Linux software, utilities and desktop environments.

    “Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of Mageia 7. We all hope that the release works as well for you as it has during our testing and development,” writes Mageia’s Donald Stewart on the project blog.

    A RPM-based Linux distribution, Mageia is a fork of Mandriva, which was a mildly popular Linux distro that shut up shop in 2011.

New Review (Video)

  • Mageia 7

    Today we are looking at Mageia 7, which is released 2 years after Mageia 6, and it is worth the wait. As we got to know and love of Mageia, it is still filled with all it's great tools and documentation, yet they smoothed it out to make it more streamlined and organized which is amazing. Mageia 7 comes with KDE Plasma 5.15 and Gnome 3.32 with Linux Kernel 5.1. The Plasma edition uses about 500Mof Ram when idling.

Video - Direct

LJ: "Mageia 7 Now Available"

Belated Slashdot coverage

  • Mageia 7 Linux Distro Released

    If you're looking to try out a Linux distro that is not based on Ubuntu, Mageia 7 might be worth your consideration. It arrives two years after the release of Mageia 6 -- so unsurprisingly, the changelog is fairly long. The Mageia developers share the significant packages that have been updated below. Significant package updates include: kernel 5.1.14, rpm 4.14.2, dnf 4.2.6, Mesa 19.1, Plasma 5.15.4, GNOME 3.32, Xfce 4.14pre, Firefox 67, Chromium 73, and LibreOffice 6.2.3.

Mageia 7 is Released

  • Mageia 7 is Released, Which comes with lots of new Features, Exciting Updates and Support Latest Hardware

    Donald Stewart has announced the release of Mageia 7 on July 01, 2019. Mageia 7 comes with lots of new features, exciting updates and support latest hardware.

    It will be supported with security and bug fix updates for 18 months, up to 2020.

    It support both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, as well as live DVD’s for 64-bit Plasma, GNOME, Xfce, and 32-bit Xfce. Also, you can install other desktops too.

    It’s offering variety of desktops and window managers, improved support for Wayland and for hybrid graphics cards. Also added many games collections.

    A good progress made on ARM support: aarch64 and ARMv7 but this still being experimental stage.

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