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today's leftovers

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  • Medieval fantasy turn-based tactics game "Fort Triumph" has a major update, final release pushed back

    Fort Triumph, the sweet medieval fantasy turn-based tactics game currently in Early Access recently had another major upgrade and they shared some news on the final release date.

    To get the big release news out first, they've decided to push it back a little since the game has grown. They're now aiming for a "Q1 2020" release. Anyone who backed the original Kickstarter for a console release, is now eligible for an extra key for the Windows/Mac/Linux version which is a nice way to handle it.

  • A look over the ProtonDB reports for June 2019, over 5.5K games reported to work with Steam Play

    ProtonDB, the unofficial website that gathers reports of how games run with Steam Play on Linux has another data-dump available, so here's another monthly run-down of the data.

    Firstly, we've seen a nice increase in the amount of games reported to be playable. When I took a look over the data last month, ProtonDB was reporting exactly 5,200 as games that "work" which has now risen to 5,539 so the growth there is quite healthy.

  • A Week in Valencia – the 2019 Plasma/Usability & Productivity Sprint

    For those that don’t know me, I’m relatively new to KDE and spend most of my time doing VDG (Visual Design Group) stuff . The Plasma/Usability & Productivity sprint in Valencia which took place from June 19th to June 26th, was my first ever KDE sprint. Although we were all working together, I was formally a part of the Usability & Productivity sprint. In this post I’m going to share what I worked on.

  • Quick update for Google Summer of Code

    So far I've been adventuring more and more into reading code and getting used to it, sometimes it can be quite hard, specially because I am reading code related to GBR brushes, which are not so simple, or even complex.

    I've been reading kis_imagepipe_brush.cpp and I've checking the classes related to it, like kis_gbr_brush.cpp and kis_brushes_pipe.h.

    Now, I have to recognize that using classes has been fun, but hard and confusing, sometimes I get a little frustrated, I feel like I am completely lost. The positive thing about this is that it means I am actually learning, and I am pushing my self.

  • New badge, stickers, and software updates

    This post departs from the usual template, mainly because we have new artwork to show off and so will, for once, not use the logo in this post.

    I had only half jokingly suggested a "terminator panda" to give the badge a bit of a fun and was very pleasantly surprised when tanvi came up with a concept art! After an iteration or two, blackfile's concept that included the logo was merged with the panda terminator to give us the final one that's shown here.

  • Fedora 30 Release Party Managua

    For this event we did not produce means of installing Fedora on physical disks but we shared the iso images of Fedora with the attendees thanks to the Fedorator.

  • Thierry Carrez: Open source in 2019, Part 1/3

    Free software started in the 80’s by defining a number of freedoms. The author of free software has to grant users (and future contributors to the software) those freedoms. To summarize, those freedoms made you free to study, improve the software, and distribute your improvements to the public, so that ultimately everyone benefits. That was done in reaction to the apparition of "proprietary" software in a world that previously considered software a public good.
    When open source was defined in 1998, it focused on a more specific angle: the rights users of the software get with the software, like access to the source code, or lack of constraints on usage. This straight focus on user rights (and less confusing naming) made it much more understandable to businesses and was key to the success of open source in our industry today.
    Despite being more business-friendly, open source was never a "business model". Open source, like free software before it, is just a set of freedoms and rights attached to software. Those are conveyed through software licenses and using copyright law as their enforcement mechanism. Publishing software under a F/OSS license may be a component of a business model, but if is the only one, then you have a problem.

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Jonas Meurer: debian lts report 2019.06

    DLA 1817-1: Uninitialized read in XBM support of libgd2. Related CVE: CVE-2019-11038.
    Work on sqlite3 security update: Spent quite some time on working on two CVEs (CVE-2019-8457 and CVE-2019-5827) that are not easy to fix. Suggested to ignore CVE-2019-8457 and prepared packages that contain a (likely incomplete) fix for CVE-2019-5827.
    DLA 1837-1: Several vulnerabilities in the rdesktop RDP client.
    DLA 1837-2: Regression update for the 1.8.6-0+deb8u1 rdesktop upload.

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: June 2019
  • LibreOffice Appliances project (GSoC 2019): Report 5.2

    So I managed to sort out the blog not building. The problem was a case of incorrect syntax in the _config.yml on this site.

    [...]

    >

    So I’m making progress with interfacing with LibreOffice, I can now start and run slideshows, which is what the project is about at its core.

    I’ll update with a screenshot/ photos of the project running on my Raspberry Pi as soon as possible.

  • Microsoft Explains Why 800 Million Windows 10 Users Can’t Auto Backup Registry

    With the release of Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update), Microsoft has disabled the Windows Registry auto-backup feature.

More in Tux Machines

Try GNOME 3.38 Orbis

Congratulations to GNOME developers! We can already try version 3.38 "Orbis" right here right now. Simply grab Fedora or openSUSE at the latest development version as you can find Orbis in them. I share with you my experience in trying out Orbis below. Along with this short review I also include the links, video, and a lot of screenshots like usual. Enjoy! Read more

Making Arch GNU/Linux 2020 Works with GLIM Multiboot USB

Continuing my business shipping computer installation media in Indonesia, recently I shipped Arch 2020 to South Sumatra the southern province in Sumatra Island along with other GNU/Linux operating systems. Apparently, nowadays Arch is a little bit different to earlier versions back in 2019 in which the ISO file contents changed by merely a character. Default GLIM configuration won't work anymore. Thus we need a change in the configurations so new Arch will work with GLIM once again. This tutorial brings you my custom change so Arch boots in multiboot way straight from the flash drive. Read more

Programming and Hardware Hacking

  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch. RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc. Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default. The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.

Programming and Hardware Hacking

  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch. RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc. Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default. The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.