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Linux 5.2

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  • Linux 5.2
    So I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because
    of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last
    week, and with spotty internet for a few days before that [*].
    
    But there really doesn't seem to be any reason for another rc, since
    it's been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but
    they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming
    merge window. Part of it may be due to the July 4th week, of course,
    but whatever - I'll take the quiet week as a good sign.
    
    So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for
    another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release
    timing.
    
    There's no particular area that stands out there - the changes are so
    small that the sppended shortlog really is the best description of
    last week. A few small random changes all over: drivers,
    architectures, filesystem, mm, ...
    
    So with this, the merge window for 5.2 is open.
    
               Linus
  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds has announced today the release and general availability of the Linux 5.2 kernel series, a major release that adds several new features, updated drivers, and many improvements.

    After seven RCs (Release Candidates), the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now available and it comes with some very interesting features and enhancements. However, before we dive into what's new, you should know that this release is not a long-term supported (LTS) branch, which means that you stick with your current LTS kernel instead.

    "I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last week," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement. "So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing."

  • Linux 5.2 Kernel Released As The "Bobtail Squid"

    Adding to the excitement of 7 July is the release of the Linux 5.2 stable kernel, which also means the opening of the Linux 5.3 merge window.

    Linux 5.2.0 made it out today on time without having any extra release candidates for this summer 2019 kernel release. This kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window and its series of release candidates that then should debut as stable in September.

    See our Linux 5.2 feature overview for those wondering about all of the exciting features of this new kernel.

By Corbet of LWN

  • The 5.2 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.2 kernel. He originally planned for an rc8 this week, rather than 5.2, due to his travel schedule, but was pleasantly surprised at how calm things have been.

The Best Features Of Linux 5.2

Update Linux Kernel In Ubuntu

Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released

  • Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released For Linux Enthusiasts

    Kernel 5.2 also continues to add more speculative execution bug fixes for Intel CPUs. There are new GPU drivers as well for ARM Mali devices.

    Apart from these changes, kernel 5.2 comes with the usual bug fixes for different drivers, better hardware support for new and older hardware, and better display performance.

Linux "Kernel 5.2 Is Out"

Sparky update

  • [Sparky] Linux kernel 5.2

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.2 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

    Arriving pretty much bang on schedule, the Linux kernel 5.2 release was announced to the world with little of Linus Torvalds’ usual fanfare.

    Instead, the Linux founder opted for a quiet introduction when announcing the update on the Linux Kernel Mailing List.

    He writes: “…despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing”.

    Each and every update to the Linux kernel, be it big or small, brings a stack of welcome improvements, drivers, hardware support, graphics compatibility and more. Linux Kernel 5.2, dubbed the “Bobtail Squid” (blame Linus’ scuba diving hobby the moniker), is no exception.

Simon Sharwood writes for CRN

  • Double delight for Linux lovers as kernel 5.2 and Debian 10 debut

    The weekend has given Linux users two big new releases to contemplate!

    Those who like new cuts of the kernel have version 5.2 to consider. Linus Torvalds signed it off on Monday, Australian time.

    The biggest feature in 5.2 is probably support for Intel’s forthcoming Comet Lake architecture, which will power the tenth generation of its Core desktop and mobile CPUs due. The new silicon is due to ship late in 2019 and appear in products early the next year. Linux 5.2 also includes many tweaks that improve its performance on laptops.

    The kernel also now supports a handful of extra ARM-powered single-board computers.

    The other big new release is Debian 10 “Buster”, which officially debuted on Sunday 7 July, Australian time. But this cut of Debian had actually already been available since 25 June as part of the new version of Raspbian OS, the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s preferred OS for its single board computers.

    The Foundation described Buster as offering “no huge differences” compared to its predecessor. “In a sad reflection of the way the world is nowadays, most of the differences are security changes designed to make Buster harder to hack,” wrote Simon Long, a senior principal software engineer at the Pi Foundation.

By: Zohaib Ahsan

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 released, here is what’s new

    Despite the busy schedule of Linus Torvalds, we’re still getting a significant release in Linux Kernel 5.2 instead of just a release candidate.

    In the original news source, the king of the Linux world, Linus Torvalds, has claimed that he was possibly going to drop another release candidate as he was having internet problems for a few days and then got busy with his travels. Luckily, Linus didn’t stick to his plan owing to the lack of pull requests since rc7 and the fact that there seemed to be no real need for another release candidate. Thus, the announcement was made for the release of Linux Kernel 5.2, codenamed Bobtail Squid.

    [...]

    The key highlights of this release are new drivers, extended hardware support, performance improvements, and security fixes. However, Linux Kernel 5.2 is a mainline version, which is usually not suitable for mass deployments. Accordingly, FOSSLinux suggests its readers wait for Linux Kernel 5.2.1 to drop before upgrading their kernels.

CNX Software on Linux 5.2 Release

Slashdot has the news 'only' one week late

  • What's New in Linux 5.2?

    Linux 5.2 has been released. This release includes Sound Open Firmware, a project that brings open source firmware to DSP audio devices; open firmware for many Intel products is also included. This release also improves the Pressure Stall Information resource monitoring to make it usable by Android; the mount API has been redesigned with new syscalls; the BFQ I/O scheduler has gained some performance improvements; a new CLONE_PIDFD flag lets clone(2) return pidfs usable by pidfd_send_signal(2); Ext4 has gained support for case-insensitive name lookups; there is also a new device mapper target that simulates a device that has failing sectors and/or read failures; open source drivers for the ARM Mali t4xx and newer 6xx/7xx have been added. Many other new drivers, features and changes can be found in the changelog.

A couple more later articles

  • Linux 5.2 rolls out with Sound Open Firmware and Comet Lake support

    Kernel Kitten here, defender of the Linux kernel, commander of the Kitten Army, sworn to protect Commander Torvalds' intellectual property, and look dead cute while we do it.

    We cats aren't designed for summer. All we want to do is try and hide from the sun as much as possible. It starts with leaving the back door open to give us options, but will they? Oh no. Typical.

    Anyway, I've stepped away from the battalion in order to give you details of the latest updates, so hopefully, in line with my new calm, empathetic, zen persona, I'll be able to keep my temper and get on with telling you what you need to know for once.

  • Linux 5.2 releases with inclusion of Sound Open Firmware project, new mount API, improved pressure stall information and more

    Two days ago, Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux 5.2 in his usual humorous way, describing it as a ‘Bobtail Squid’. The release has new additions like the inclusion of the Sound Open Firmware (SOF) project, improved pressure stall information, new mount API, significant performance improvements in the BFQ I/O scheduler, new GPU drivers, optional support for case-insensitive names in ext4 and more. The earlier version, Linux 5.1 was released exactly two months ago.

    Torvalds says, “there really doesn’t seem to be any reason for another rc, since it’s been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming merge window. So despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing.”

    Linux 5.2 also kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window.

Late coverage today by Marius Nestor of kernel release

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Series Is Now Ready for Mass Deployments, Upgrade Now

    Released earlier this month, the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now ready for mass deployments as the first point releases are out, marking the branch as stable on the kernel.org website.
    Linux kernel 5.2 is a major release adding several exciting new features and improvements, including an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices, a new file system mount API, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, as well as better resource monitoring for Android.

    It also brings performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new device mapper "dust" target designed to simulate devices with failing sectors and read failures, a freezer controller for cgroups v2 for freeing up resources, and a CLONE_PIDFD flag to clone(2) for fetching PIDs when creating processes usable by pidfd_send_signal(2).

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