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Mozilla Firefox 68 Is Now Available to Download for Linux, Mac, and Windows

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Moz/FF

The Mozilla Firefox 68 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available to download for GNU/Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms ahead of tomorrow's official release.
Scheduled to be released on July 9th, 2019, the Firefox 68 web browser can be downloaded and installed right now from Mozilla's official download servers. So if you can't wait until tomorrow's official release, you can go ahead and download Firefox 68 for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows operating systems.

Mozilla Firefox 68 isn't an impress release as it only brings some minor improvements and not so exciting features. For example, it introduces a new reporting feature in about:addons to make it easier for users to report security and performance issues for add-ons and themes.

It also adds support for accessing the Firefox Account settings directly from the hamburger menu, implements a full page color contrast audit capable of identifying all the elements on a web page that fail the color contrast checks, and brings WebRender support for Windows 10 users with AMD graphics cards.

Read more

Official Mozilla Post and VPN News

  • Latest Firefox Release Available today for iOS and Desktop

    Since our last Firefox release, we’ve been working on features to make the Firefox Quantum browser work better for you. We added by default Enhanced Tracking Protection which blocks known “third-party tracking cookies” from following your every move. With this latest Firefox release we’ve added new features so you can browse the web the way you want — unfettered and free. We’ve also made improvements for IT managers who want more flexibility when using Firefox in the workplace.

  • Mozilla is planning a Firefox VPN, with a beta expected in three months

    The paid-for options will be optional, though, and Dave Camp, senior vice president of Firefox said that "A high-performing, free and private-by-default Firefox browser will continue to be central to our core service offerings."

  • Firefox might get a built-in VPN later this year

    We asked Mozilla what was going on and they kindly told us: "In 2019, we are continuing to explore new product features and offerings. As part of this, small groups of browser users are invited at random to respond to surveys, provide feedback and potentially test proposed new features, products or services.

    "These explorations can easily be identified as they will always include the URL https://firstlook.firefox.com. And as always, what we are not experimenting with is the cost to access Firefox itself, which is now, and always will be free."

Changes in Firefox 68

  • Changes in Firefox 68

    Firefox 68 is coming out today, and we wanted to highlight a few of the changes coming to add-ons. We’ve updated addons.mozilla.org (AMO) and the Add-ons Manager (about:addons) in Firefox to help people find high-quality, secure extensions more easily. We’re also making it easier to manage installed add-ons and report potentially harmful extensions and themes directly from the Add-ons Manager.

Firefox 68: BigInts, Contrast Checks, and the QuantumBar

LWN coverage

Update For ‘Full Dark Mode’ And More

  • Firefox Quantum Gets New Update For ‘Full Dark Mode’ And More

    Mozilla has released a new update to its Firefox Quantum browser, following an update that was released back in May this year.

    The latest update has brought in new features to the browser that include the ability to have the dark mode for all the sections of the website. This will be applicable to texts, sidebars, and even toolbars.

Firefox 68 Released, This is What’s New

  • Firefox 68 Released, This is What’s New

    Mozilla Firefox 68 has arrived with the usual boatload of bug fixes and betterments in tow.

    The latest update to the super-popular open-source web browser is also available as a new Extended Support Release (ESR) version.

    What’s new? Well, nothing that you’ll be screaming from the hills about (good or bad).

    Fans of Firefox’s Reader Mode feature will likely appreciate the addition “blackout shades”, a feature that (supposedly) turns the Firefox toolbar and Reader sidebar dark when the ‘dark’ contrast option is enabled.

    In my testing I found that while the sidebar does turn dark, the Firefox toolbar remains its usual colour.

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Games: Slay the Spire, Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle, Stadia, Open Surge and Boxtron

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    One thing is for sure, Slay the Spire truly has kicked off a deck-building indie game revolution of sorts. More and more are releasing with deck-building and A Long Way Down seems like one of the better ones so far. Note: Key provided by the publisher, Goblinz Studio. Quite derivative I would say though, in the nicest way possible. The deck-building card-based combat from Slay the Spire is merged in with maze building in a similar fashion to what's seen in Guild of Dungeoneering.

  • The Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle is up with 100% going to charity

    Humble are back with a new bundle, although this is a 100% charity bundle to help deal with the sad situation in Australia. The Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle only has one tier at $25, which does include quite a lot of games. Here's what's included, I've highlighted in bold text those with Linux support....

  • Google plan over 120 Stadia games this year, 10 coming to Stadia before other platforms

    In their latest community update, the Stadia Team have given a small insight into what's coming to the Linux-powered game streaming service Stadia across 2020. Missed our first impressions of Stadia? Check them out here. They said "more than" 120 games will be coming to Stadia this year, more interestingly though they also mentioned that 10 will be arriving in the "first half of this year" that will "only" be on Stadia when they launch. So that's presumably some timed-exclusives they have going. No names were mentioned, so we just have to wait and see.

  • Move over Sonic, Surge has arrived with Open Surge - a game engine and retro platformer

    I grew up playing the early Sonic games so Open Surge really speaks to me. A retro Sonic-inspired platformer (that's actually quite polished already) and a game engine for others to create with it. Open Surge is free and open source software (GPL license), so anyone can grab it from GitHub and do whatever they wish. Written from scratch in C, using the cross-platform Allegro programming library.

  • Boxtron, the Steam Play tool to run games through a native DOSBox on Linux has a new release

    Boxtron is another awesome Steam Play tool! Covered here a few times now, like Proton it enables you to play games on Linux that don't have a Linux build setup on Steam only this is for DOSBox games. Rather than running DOSBox-powered games on Steam through Proton when they don't have a Linux build of it all up, using Boxtron should give a better experience. Today a new release went up with Boxtron 0.5.4 fixing multiple issues including: games that use multiple CD images not starting like The Dame Was Loaded (and probably other FMV titles), they tweaked Retro City Rampage 486 to use "aspect=false", several bugs around parsing user-supplied regex for MIDI synthesiser detection were fixed, they also fixed a bug preventing MIDI port detection if there are no soundfonts installed and there's now several fallback soundfont names for various Linux distributions.

Graphics: CVE-2019-14615, Mir 1.7 Release, Panfrost Talk ("Liberating ARM GPUs")

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    It's been another day testing and investigating CVE-2019-14615, a.k.a. the Intel graphics hardware issue where for Gen9 all turned out to be okay but for Gen7 graphics leads to some big performance hits. Besides the Core i7 tests published yesterday in the aforelinked article, tests on relevant Core i3 and i5 CPUs are currently being carried out for seeing the impact there (so far, it's looking to be equally brutal). The contents of CVE-2019-14615 are still marked private, but the Red Hat Customer Portal has opened their guidance on this graphics flaw. Red Hat rates this CVE as having moderate impact. This Red Hat bug report does shed some more light onto the issue.

  • Mir 1.7 Released With Improvements For Running X11 Software

    Mir 1.7 was released today as the newest feature release for this Ubuntu-focused display stack that for the past two years now has focused on serving viable Wayland support. With the Mir 1.7 release there are a number of X11 client improvements, including the ability to show basic window decorations, a new configuration knob for specifying the XWayland executable to utilize for the support, and various code clean-ups.

  • Panfrost: Liberating ARM GPUs @ Linux Conf Au

    This talk covers the history, future and internals of the Panfrost driver for ARM GPUs.

Red Hat Leftovers

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