Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A look at Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

In this article, we will look at Chromebooks and why it is becoming so popular in the world today and if it is worth considering as your next computer or a second computer.

The first Chromebooks arrived in June 2011. They were basic computers that were simply a Chrome Browser on a cheap computer. The price was also quite low. Soon the market grew as many people started to experience the joy which, we Linux users, always enjoyed; fast updates, free and no viruses and let's face it many people are merely using a computer to browse the internet, and they don't need the rest and Google released that a Chromebook meet that need.

After Chromebooks grew in popularity, especially in schools, but businesses and for home use also, Google realized that people are missing some apps. As people are familiar to Windows and apps galore, so they brought the Google Play Store to Chromebooks, which has been one of their best moves yet, as people are already familiar with it due to Android phones and as Chrome OS and the Play Store is part of Google, it was an obvious move.

However, this move brought in a new stage for Chromebooks as well because no users can run many more apps, but it also means that Chromebooks needs more system resources, so different price ranges for Chromebooks appears. Cheap ones and pricey ones with powerful hardware.

As Chromebooks become more powerful and more popular Google continues to improve it by bringing more software to it, and the next thing is Linux apps so that we can run native Linux apps like LibreOffice, Blender, etc. on a Chromebook. It is still a work in progress, and they are continuing to improve it so that it can run nearly all the Linux apps in the future flawlessly.

Crossover also released a package to run Windows apps on Chromebooks and Wine also have a package for Android, and I will be surprised if it doesn't work on Chromebooks as well.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

HAT offers hardware watchdog for Raspberry Pi

On Kickstarter: Sequent Microsystems has launched a $15 “Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi” for protecting against software lock-ups. Hardware-based watchdog timers are usually standard equipment on industrial computers, but are rarely seen on Linux hacker boards. Sequent Microsystems, which has previously launched Raspberry Pi add-ons such as the MegaIO-IND home automation board, has now successfully launched a Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi. The HAT is available on Kickstarter through Oct. 17 for $15 for Jan. 2020 delivery or $20 for Nov. 2019 delivery. Read more

KDE Plasma 5.17 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Lands October 15

KDE Plasma 5.17 promises some really cool new features and enhancements, among which we can mention multi-screen and HiDPI improvements, fractional scaling on Wayland, support for managing and configuring Thunderbolt hardware in System Settings, Night Color support on X11, and much-improved notifications with automatic Do Not Disturb mode for presentations. Several of the pages in System Settings got redesigned to help you configure your KDE Plasma system easier, the Breeze GTK theme now offers users a better appearance for the Chromium and Google Chrome web browsers and supports system color schemes for GTK and GNOME apps, System Monitor now shows NVidia GPU stats, and Plasma Discover package manager now shows icons for Snap apps. Read more

Best Linux distros of 2019: for beginners and advanced users

Linux is traditionally associated as being an operating system for coders and programmers, but over the years there have been real attempts to make Linux more attractive to general consumers. This is not least due to general consumer dissatisfaction with Windows security issues or even Apple's walled garden. However, Linux comes in many different forms, known as 'flavors' or 'distros'. This is simply because Linux is so incredibly configurable that different forms tend to be developed for different userbase needs or interests. Read more