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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • AMD announces μProf 3.0, a free tool to optimise apps for AMD processors

    AMD has updated its μProf software in line with the release of Zen 2 processors. Announced its Ryzen Twitter channel via Reddit, the software encompasses four tools that AMD claims allow developers to identify ways to optimise their applications for AMD processors.

    μProf 3.0 gives detailed runtime performance information from CPU profiling to system-wide power profiling. Windows developers can also analyses which areas of an application are more resource intensive, while Linux and FreeBSD developers can monitor system performance metrics. AMD has introduced several new features with the 3.0 update, the principal of which is support for 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Desktop processors.

  • Awesome Web Scraping

    Few days ago we've heard from some of our friends talking about scraping. At that time me like, hey what scrap...? Then knowing somethiing about that took my attention seriously on that amazing technique. Extracting data from websites - sounds really crazy. And yeap, We did something to get started. Now, may be it's your turn.

  • Python Comprehensions are Awesome!

    When programming, it's quite common to want to create a collection of some kind, from another collection, usually with some modification taking place along the way. Python gives an awesome set of tools for dealing with this kind of problem: comprehensions. If you're not using comprehensions regularly in your code, read on, and I'll show you what you're missing out on!

  • Python Seaborn Tutorial | Data Visualization Using Seaborn

    Python is a storehouse of numerous immensely powerful libraries and frameworks. Among them, is Seaborn, which is a dominant data visualization library. In this Python Seaborn Tutorial, you will be leaning all the knacks of data visualization using Seaborn.

    So let’s begin first by reasoning out the importance of Python Seaborn.

  • g_queue_insert_before_link() in GLib 2.61.1

    The second post in a little mini-series on new APIs in the GLib 2.62 series, this one’s about Christian Hergert’s g_queue_insert_before_link().

    This is a new helper function for inserting elements at arbitrary positions in a queue, without needing to allocate a new container element for them. Previously, using g_queue_insert_before(), a new GList container would have been allocated. The new function means that elements can be moved from one position in a queue to another, without any allocations; and statically allocated GList elements can be used in a GQueue correctly.

  • New Course: Learn the Fundamentals of Probability for Data Science

    Learning probability and statistics isn’t the first thing most aspiring data analysts and scientists tackle. But make no mistake: understanding the math is just as critical as understanding the programming!

  • Embedded System Development for IoT: Three-Part Series

    The landscape of embedded systems and computing is changing. Fast. IoT in particular is driving widespread change in technology when it comes to standards, hardware, systems, and software, with the need for all of these components to work seamlessly as a complete infrastructure. Meanwhile, the demand for increased functionality at the edge has underscored the need for faster and more formidable compute power across entire systems or networks.

  • Find the average negative values from the DataFrame

More in Tux Machines

Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice development

Throughout the second half of 2018, the developer community worked on a new major release: LibreOffice 6.2. Details about the end-user-facing new features are provided on this page, and in the following video – so in the rest of this blog post, we’ll focus on developer-related changes. Read more

Programming Leftovers

Linux Kernel: Chrome OS, Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) and Char/Misc

  • Various Chrome OS Hardware Support Improvements Make It Into Linux 5.3 Mainline

    Various Chrome OS hardware platform support improvements have made it into the Linux 5.3 kernel for those after running other Linux distributions on Chromebooks and the like as well as reducing Google's maintenance burden with traditionally carrying so much material out-of-tree.

  • The Massive DRM Pull Request With AMDGPU Navi Support Sent In For Linux 5.3

    At 479,818 lines of new code and just 36,145 lines of code removed while touching nearly two thousand files, the Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) driver updates for Linux 5.3 are huge. But a big portion of that line count is the addition of AMD Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" support and a good portion of that in turn being auto-generated header files. Navi support is ready for the mainline Linux kernel!

  • Char/Misc Has A Bit Of Changes All Over For Linux 5.3

    The char/misc changes with each succeeding kernel release seem to have less changes to the character device subsystem itself and more just a random collection of changes not fitting in other subsystems / pull requests. With Linux 5.3 comes another smothering of different changes.

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