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Programming With Python

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Development
  • For loop in Django template

    For loop is used to iterate over any iterable object, accessing one item at a time and making it available inside the for loop body.

  • Creating custom template tags in Django

    Sometimes existing templates tags are not enough for rebellious developers. They need to create custom template tags to use.

  • Python Anywhere: Using our file API

    Our API supports lots of common PythonAnywhere operations, like creating and managing consoles, scheduled and always-on tasks, and websites. We recently added support for reading/writing files; this blog post gives a brief overview of how you can use it to do that.

  • Make an RGB cube with Python and Scribus

    When I decided I wanted to play with color this summer, I thought about the fact that colors are usually depicted on a color wheel. This is usually with pigment colors rather than light, and you lose any sense of the variation in color brightness or luminosity.

    As an alternative to the color wheel, I came up with the idea of displaying the RGB spectrum on the surfaces of a cube using a series of graphs. RGB values would be depicted on a three-dimensional graph with X-, Y-, and Z-axes. For example, a surface would keep B (or blue) at 0 and the remaining axes would show what happens as I plot values as colors for R (red) and G (green) from 0 to 255.

    It turns out this is not very difficult to do using Scribus and its Python Scripter capability. I can create RGB colors, make rectangles showing the colors, and arrange them in a 2D format. I decided to make value jumps of 5 for the colors and make rectangles measuring 5 points on a side. Thus, for each 2D graph, I would make about 250 colors, and the cube would measure 250 points to a side, or 3.5 inches.

  • Wing Python IDE 7.0.4

    Wing 7 introduces an improved code warnings and code quality inspection system that includes built-in error detection and tight integration with Pylint, pep8, and mypy. This release also adds a new data frame and array viewer, a MATLAB keyboard personality, easy inline debug data display with Shift-Space, improved stack data display, support for PEP 3134 chained exceptions, callouts for search and other code navigation features, four new color palettes, improved bookmarking, a high-level configuration menu, magnified presentation mode, a new update manager, stepping over import internals, simplified remote agent installation, and much more.

  • Data School: My top 25 pandas tricks (video)

    In my new pandas video, you're going to learn 25 tricks that will help you to work faster, write better code, and impress your friends. These are the most useful tricks I've learned from 5 years of teaching Python's pandas library.

    Each trick is about a minute long, so you're going to learn a ton of new pandas skills in less than 30 minutes!

  • ODSC webinar: End-to-End Data Science Without Leaving the GPU

    In this webinar sponsored by the Open Data Science Conference (ODSC), I outline a brief history of GPU analytics and the problems that using GPU analytics solves relative to using other parallel computation methods such as Hadoop. I also demonstrate how OmniSci fits into the broader GPU-accelerated data science workflow, with examples provided using Python.

  • Convert hexadecimal number to decimal number with Python program
  • Introduction to unit testing with Python
  • Python 3.7.3 : Three examples with BeautifulSoup.
  • SongSearch autocomplete rate now 2+ per second
  • 2019 PSF Fundraiser - Thank you & debrief
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week #6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Fourth Blog - GSOC 2019
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Coding and Communication

More in Tux Machines

Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice development

Throughout the second half of 2018, the developer community worked on a new major release: LibreOffice 6.2. Details about the end-user-facing new features are provided on this page, and in the following video – so in the rest of this blog post, we’ll focus on developer-related changes. Read more

Programming Leftovers

Linux Kernel: Chrome OS, Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) and Char/Misc

  • Various Chrome OS Hardware Support Improvements Make It Into Linux 5.3 Mainline

    Various Chrome OS hardware platform support improvements have made it into the Linux 5.3 kernel for those after running other Linux distributions on Chromebooks and the like as well as reducing Google's maintenance burden with traditionally carrying so much material out-of-tree.

  • The Massive DRM Pull Request With AMDGPU Navi Support Sent In For Linux 5.3

    At 479,818 lines of new code and just 36,145 lines of code removed while touching nearly two thousand files, the Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) driver updates for Linux 5.3 are huge. But a big portion of that line count is the addition of AMD Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" support and a good portion of that in turn being auto-generated header files. Navi support is ready for the mainline Linux kernel!

  • Char/Misc Has A Bit Of Changes All Over For Linux 5.3

    The char/misc changes with each succeeding kernel release seem to have less changes to the character device subsystem itself and more just a random collection of changes not fitting in other subsystems / pull requests. With Linux 5.3 comes another smothering of different changes.

today's howtos