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Programming: OpenHMD 0.3.0, GNU C Library and Python

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Development
  • OpenHMD 0.3.0 ‘Djungelvral’ Released!

    We are very happy to announce that after years of reverse engineering devices, hacking, testing and pushing, we are releasing OpenHMD version 0.3.0 (codename ‘Djungelvral’).We are very happy to announce that after years of reverse engineering devices, hacking, testing and pushing, we are releasing OpenHMD version 0.3.0 (codename ‘Djungelvral’).

    We want to thank each and every one of the 125-150 people who have contributed over the last 3.5 years. Helping out with reverse engineering, writing drivers, testing, donating/lending hardware, building applications and games, showing up at (or hosting) Hack-athons.. we are incredibly lucky to have your support. Thank you!

    The list of features bringing us from v0.2.0 to v0.3.0 is insane and that is despite not all the features and experimental drivers making the cut for this release. Since we have a really long list of changes, lets look at a couple of highlights in this release!

  • OpenHMD 0.3 Released With Support For More VR/AR Devices

    OpenHMD remains focused on a free and open-source API/drivers for immersive technology devices, primarily VR headsets. OpenHMD 0.3 supports the 3Glasses D3, Oculus CV1, Windows Mixed Reality HMD, NOLO, HTC Vive, HTC Vive Pro, Deepoon E2, and GearVR Gen1. While previously supported, the PlayStation PSVR was disabled in the v0.3 release.

  • Glibc's Slow Turnaround For Y2038 Fixes Is Frustrating

    While there is another nineteen years to go until the Year 2038 problem manifests, the GNU C Library "glibc" is one of the key software components still needing some fixes for this issue where this problem where storing the Unix time as a 32-bit signed integer will wrap around and become a negative number.

    Wolfgang Denk of German software engineering firm DENX put out a "desperate call for help" that even with their resources/money for trying to fix up Y2038 Glibc issues, the review/upstreaming process is taking too long for some of their customers. In particular, even few lines of code patches aren't being accepted upstream at least in any timely manner.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (clxxxvi) stackoverflow python report
  • Udemy Class Review: Python For Beginners Complete Python Programming

    Learning to program software can be an exceedingly difficult task, but one that has great rewards if you are successful. If you’ve never heard of Python before, it’s a versatile programming language that is known for being relatively easy to learn. Numerous websites and tools are available online that aim to make learning Python programming easier, but Udemy’s Python for Beginners: Complete Python Programming course ($11.99) doesn’t live up to its promise.

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Programming Leftovers

Linux Kernel: Chrome OS, Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) and Char/Misc

  • Various Chrome OS Hardware Support Improvements Make It Into Linux 5.3 Mainline

    Various Chrome OS hardware platform support improvements have made it into the Linux 5.3 kernel for those after running other Linux distributions on Chromebooks and the like as well as reducing Google's maintenance burden with traditionally carrying so much material out-of-tree.

  • The Massive DRM Pull Request With AMDGPU Navi Support Sent In For Linux 5.3

    At 479,818 lines of new code and just 36,145 lines of code removed while touching nearly two thousand files, the Direct Rendering Manger (DRM) driver updates for Linux 5.3 are huge. But a big portion of that line count is the addition of AMD Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" support and a good portion of that in turn being auto-generated header files. Navi support is ready for the mainline Linux kernel!

  • Char/Misc Has A Bit Of Changes All Over For Linux 5.3

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