Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Operating Systems: Debian, Clear Linux, OpenSUSE and Vista 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Debian
SUSE
  • John Goerzen: Tips for Upgrading to, And Securing, Debian Buster

    Wow.  Once again, a Debian release impresses me — a guy that’s been using Debian for more than 20 years.  For the first time I can ever recall, buster not only supported suspend-to-disk out of the box on my laptop, but it did so on an encrypted volume atop LVM.  Very impressive!

    For those upgrading from previous releases, I have a few tips to enhance the experience with buster.

  • Clear Linux Could Soon Be Faster Within Containers On AVX2 Systems

    While Clear Linux as part of its standard bare metal installations has long defaulted to having an AVX2-optimized GNU C Library installed by default, it turns out that it wasn't part of the default os-core bundle as used by containers. That though is changing and should yield even better out-of-the-box performance when running Clear Linux within containers.

    Intel's William Douglas sent out the proposal for adding the AVX2 version of the Glibc libraries into the os-core bundle in order to get picked up by containers and other bare/lightweight Clear configurations.

  • OpenSUSE Enables LTO By Default For Tumbleweed - Smaller & Faster Binaries

    The past few months openSUSE developers have been working on enabling LTO by default for its packages while now finally with the newest release of the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed this goal has been accomplished. 

    As of today, the latest openSUSE Tumbleweed release is using Link-Time Optimizations (LTO) by default. For end-users this should mean faster -- and smaller -- binaries thanks to the additional optimizations performed at link-time. Link-time optimizations allow for different optimizations to be performed at link-time for the different bits comprising a single module/binary for the entire program. Sadly not many Linux distributions are yet LTO'ing their entire package set besides the aggressive ones like Clear Linux. 

  • Investigating why my 7-year old Windows 10 laptop became unbearably slow

    The laptop had also begun to run into blue screens of death (BSoD) whenever I used the built-in camera and when I opened Spotify or Netflix in a web browser. The slowdown and crashes were actually related, but I didn’t realize this at first. The camera-induced BSoD error message blamed the camera vendor’s driver without any further details. This sounds believable enough for a 7-year old laptop so I didn’t think any more of it.

More in Tux Machines

Debian: Salsa, Promoting Debian LTS and Debian Patch Porting System

  • salsa.debian.org: Postmortem of failed Docker registry move

    The Salsa admin team provides the following report about the failed migration of the Docker container registry. The Docker container registry stores Docker images, which are for example used in the Salsa CI toolset. This migration would have moved all data off to Google Cloud Storage (GCS) and would have lowered the used file system space on Debian systems significantly. [...] On 2019-08-06 the migration process was started. The migration itself went fine, although it took a bit longer than anticipated. However, as not all parts of the migration had been properly tested, a test of the garbage collection triggered a bug in the software. On 2019-08-10 the Salsa admins started to see problems with garbage collection. The job running it timed out after one hour. Within this timeframe it not even managed to collect information about all used layers to see what it can cleanup. A source code analysis showed that this design flaw can't be fixed. On 2019-08-13 the change was rolled back to storing data on the file system.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Promoting Debian LTS with stickers, flyers and a video

    With the agreement of the Debian LTS contributors funded by Freexian, earlier this year I decided to spend some Freexian money on marketing: we sponsored DebConf 19 as a bronze sponsor and we prepared some stickers and flyers to give out during the event. The stickers only promote the Debian LTS project with the semi-official logo we have been using and a link to the wiki page. You can see them on the back of a laptop in the picture below.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, July 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Jaskaran Singh: GSoC Final Report

    The Debian Patch Porting System aims to systematize and partially automate the security patch porting process. In this Google Summer of Code (2019), I wrote a webcrawler to extract security patches for a given security vulnerability identifier. This webcrawler or patch-finder serves as the first step of the Debian Patch Porting System. The Patch-finder should recognize numerous vulnerability identifiers. These identifiers can be security advisories (DSA, GLSA, RHSA), vulnerability identifiers (OVAL, CVE), etc. So far, it can identify CVE, DSA (Debian Security Advisory), GLSA (Gentoo Linux Security Advisory) and RHSA (Red Hat Security Advisory). Each vulnerability identifier has a list of entrypoint URLs associated with it. These URLs are used to initiate the patch finding.

Android Leftovers

Marek’s Take: Why open source communities are critical to operators

Open source locks down standards in code and makes sure it is interoperable, Rice said. “That’s why it’s symbiotic. Standards are options but they come together because they are built on one another.”

And, similar to standards bodies, where delegates work side-by-side with competitors to develop global specifications, the same occurs in open source groups.

Read more

The infrastructure is code: A story of COBOL and Go

But what about today? With the decline of mainframes and the rise of newer and more innovative languages designed for the web and cloud, where does COBOL sit? As last week's episode of Command Line Heroes mentioned, in the late 1990s, Perl (as well as JavaScript and C++) was outpacing COBOL. And, as Perl's creator, Larry Wall stated then: "COBOL is no big deal these days since demand for COBOL seems to be trailing off, for some strange reason." Read more