Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu/Debian: Comparison of Memory Usages, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life and More

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Comparison of Memory Usages of Ubuntu 19.04 and Flavors in 2019

    Continuing my previous Mem. Comparison 2018, here's my 2019 comparison with all editions of Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo". The operating system editions I use here are the eight: Ubuntu Desktop, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Budgie. I installed every one of them on my laptop and (immediately at first login) took screenshot of the System Monitor (or Task Manager) without doing anything else. I present here the screenshots along with each variant's list of processes at the time I took them. And, you can download the ODS file I used to create the chart below. Finally, I hope this comparison helps all of you and next time somebody can make better comparisons.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life reached on July 18 2019
    This is a follow-up to the End of Life warning sent earlier this month
    to confirm that as of today (July 18, 2019), Ubuntu 18.10 is no longer
    supported.  No more package updates will be accepted to 18.10, and
    it will be archived to old-releases.ubuntu.com in the coming weeks.
    
    
    
    
    The original End of Life warning follows, with upgrade instructions:
    
    
    
    
    Ubuntu announced its 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release almost 9 months
    ago, on October 18, 2018.  As a non-LTS release, 18.10 has a 9-month
    support cycle and, as such, the support period is now nearing its
    end and Ubuntu 18.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 18th.
    
    
    
    
    At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include
    information or updated packages for Ubuntu 18.10.
    
    
    
    
    The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 18.10 is via Ubuntu 19.04.
    Instructions and caveats for the upgrade may be found at:
    
    
    
    
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DiscoUpgrades
    
    
    
    
    Ubuntu 19.04 continues to be actively supported with security updates
    and select high-impact bug fixes.  Announcements of security updates
    for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing
    list, information about which may be found at:
    
    
    
    
    https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce
    
    
    
    
    Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most
    highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes,
    schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open
    Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to
    customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.
    
    
    
    
    On behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team,
    
    
    
    
    Adam Conrad
    
  • CMake leverages the Snapcraft Summit with Travis CI to build snaps

    CMake is an open-source, cross-platform family of tools designed to build, test and package software. It is used to control the software compilation process and generate native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in any compiler environment. 

    While some users of CMake want to stay up to date with the latest release, others want to be able to stay with a known version and choose when to move forward to newer releases, picking up just the minor bug fixes for the feature release they are tracking. Users may also occasionally need to roll back to an earlier feature release, such as when a bug or a change introduced in a newer CMake version exposes problems within their project.

    Craig Scott, one of the co-maintainers of CMake, sees snaps as an excellent solution to these needs. Snaps’ ability to support separate tracks for each feature release in addition to giving users the choice of following official releases, release candidates or bleeding edge builds are an ideal fit. When he received an invitation to the 2019 Snapcraft Summit, he was keen to work directly with those at the pointy end of developing and supporting the snap system. 

  • Ubuntu's Zsys Client/Daemon For ZFS On Linux Continues Maturing For Eoan

    Looking ahead to Ubuntu 19.10 as the cycle before Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, one of the areas exciting us with the work being done by Canonical is (besides the great upstream GNOME performance work) easily comes down to the work they are pursuing on better ZFS On Linux integration with even aiming to offer ZFS as a file-system option from their desktop installer. A big role in their ZoL play is also the new "Zsys" component they have been developing. 

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Ubuntu 18.10 Reaches End of Life!

  • Ubuntu 18.10 Reaches End of Life! Existing Users Must Upgrade Now

    End of life is the term used for the date after which an operating system release won’t get updates. Ubuntu provides security and maintenance upgrades in order to keep your systems safe from cyber attacks.

    After Ubuntu 18.10 reaches end of life, you won’t get the security updates, you won’t get maintenance updates on your installed software and soon you won’t even be able to install programs from Ubuntu repositories.

Kubuntu 18.10 reaches end of life

  • Kubuntu 18.10 reaches end of life

    Kubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish was released on October 18th 2018 with 9 months support. As of 18th July 2019, 18.10 reaches ‘end of life’. No more package updates will be accepted to 18.10, and it will be archived to old-releases.ubuntu.com in the coming weeks.

    The official end of life announcement for Ubuntu as a whole can be found here [1].

    Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo continues to be supported, receiving security and high-impact bugfix updates until January 2020.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Jupiter (Linux Academy) and TLLTS

Android Leftovers

KMyMoney 5.0.6 released

The KMyMoney development team today announces the immediate availability of version 5.0.6 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Another maintenance release is ready: KMyMoney 5.0.6 comes with some important bugfixes. As usual, problems have been reported by our users and the development team fixed some of them in the meantime. The result of this effort is the brand new KMyMoney 5.0.6 release. Despite even more testing we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org. Read more

Games: Don't Starve Together, Cthulhu Saves the World, EVERSPACE 2 and Stadia

  • Don't Starve Together has a big free update adding in boats and a strange island

    Klei Entertainment have given the gift of new features to their co-op survival game Don't Starve Together, with the Turn of Tides update now available. Taking a little inspiration from the Shipwrecked DLC available for the single-player version Don't Starve, this new free update enables you to build a boat to carry you and other survivors across the sea. Turn of Tides is the first part of a larger update chain they're calling Return of Them, so I'm excited to see what else is going to come to DST.

  • Cthulhu Saves the World has an unofficial Linux port available

    In response to an announcement to a sequel to Cthulhu Saves the World, Ethan Lee AKA flibitijibibo has made a unofficial port for the original and a few other previously Windows-only games. As a quick reminder FNA is a reimplementation of the proprietary XNA API created by Micrsosoft and quite a few games were made with that technology. We’ve gotten several ports thanks to FNA over the years though Ethan himself has mostly moved on to other projects like working on FAudio and Steam Play.

  • EVERSPACE 2 announced, with more of a focus on exploration and it will release for Linux

    EVERSPACE is probably one of my absolute favourite space shooters from the last few years, so I'm extremely excited to see EVERSPACE 2 be announced and confirmed for Linux. For the Linux confirmation, I reached out on Twitter where the developer replied with "#Linux support scheduled for full release in 2021!".

  • Google reveal more games with the latest Stadia Connect, including Cyberpunk 2077

    Today, Google went back to YouTube to show off an impressive list of games coming to their Stadia game streaming service, which we already know is powered by Debian Linux and Vulkan. As a reminder, Google said not to see Stadia as if it was the "Netflix of games", as it's clearly not. Stadia Base requires you to buy all your games as normal, with Stadia Pro ($9.99 monthly) giving you a trickle of free games to access on top of 4K and surround sound support.