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Devices: Orange Pi Zero, Avalue, RTL-SDR

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Linux
Hardware
  • Orange Pi Zero LTS SBC Launched for $8.49 and Up

    You can now buy Orange Pi Zero LTS Arm Linux SBC for $8.49 and up. The tiny board is ideal for headless applications with WiFI and Ethernet connectivity.

  • Toughened up embedded PC can run 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs

    Avalue’s rugged “EPS-CFS” computer runs Linux or Win 10 on Intel 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs up to an octa-core Core i7-9700TE, and supplies up to 32GB GB DDR4, 2x SATA bays, 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.2 ports.

    Avalue announced an embedded computer with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake T-series or the new, but similarly 14nm-fabricated, 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh TE-series chips. The EPS-CFS computer, which is built around Avalue’s 3.5-inch ECM-CFS SBC, joins other 9th Gen-ready products including Kontron’s COMe-cWL6 (E2S) and Congatec’s Conga-TS370 COM Express modules.

  • RTL-SDR: Seven Years Later

    When I wrote that article in 2012, the RTL-SDR project and its community were still in their infancy. It took some real digging to find out which TV tuners based on the Realtek RTL2832U were supported, what adapters you needed to connect more capable antennas, and how to compile all the software necessary to get them listening outside of their advertised frequency range. It wasn’t exactly the most user-friendly experience, and when it was all said and done, you were left largely to your own devices. If you didn’t know how to create your own receivers in GNU Radio, there wasn’t a whole lot you could do other than eavesdrop on hams or tune into local FM broadcasts.

    Nearly a decade later, things have changed dramatically. The RTL-SDR hardware and software has itself improved enormously, but perhaps more importantly, the success of the project has kicked off something of a revolution in the software defined radio (SDR) world. Prior to 2012, SDRs were certainly not unobtainable, but they were considerably more expensive. Back then, the most comparable device on the market would have been the FUNcube dongle, a nearly $200 USD receiver that was actually designed for receiving data from CubeSats. Anything cheaper than that was likely to be a kit, and often operated within a narrower range of frequencies.

Orange Pi Zero2

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weston 7.0.0

Weston 7.0.0 is released!

ABI note: the return value of two functions introduced in this release
has been changed from void to int: weston_log_scope_printf and
weston_log_scope_vprintf. Additionally weston_binding_destroy has been
made public again.

Daniel Stone (1):
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Manuel Stoeckl (1):
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Marius Vlad (2):
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Simon Ser (1):
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sichem (1):
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git tag: 7.0.0
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