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Sound control on minimal setups

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HowTos

“So K.Mandla,” you say. “Those minimal setups are nifty, but where is the volume control?”

Ah, grasshopper. Watch closely.

Ubuntu installs alsa-base and alsa-utils by default (as part of ubuntu-minimal), and provided you didn’t rip them out when you built your minimal system, you still have a nifty ncurses application for modifying sound settings: alsamixer.

Start a terminal and type in alsamixer and you get this:

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The trick to getting GAG

Also on same site:

Grub sucks. I know, I know: It works well and it’s very good at what it does. But Grub is probably in the top five of all the problems Ubuntu newbs have, and by not being the least bit user-friendly, it has rightfully earned a bad reputation.

Now GAG, on the other hand, is very easy to work with. A pretty (by comparison) startup menu with push-button menu options, dead-simple configuration and cute icons for each operating system. Newbs will squeal with delight. (Screenshots are on the GAG site, if you don’t mind following the link.)

The only downside is that GAG and Grub don’t really … coexist. So here’s the trick:

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