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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Is Out with Linux Kernel 5.0 from Ubuntu 19.04, Download Now

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Coming six months after the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS release, which shipped with the hardware enablement (HWE) kernel from the not deprecated Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS here as the third point release in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) series with up-to-date components.

Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS includes all the latest software and security fixes that have been published on the official repositories of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release since February 14th, 2019, when Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS hit the streets. It also ships with updated kernel and graphics stacks from Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), such as Linux kernel 5.0.

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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Released

  • Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Released - Switches To Using 19.04's Linux 5.0 HWE

    Canonical has announced the immediate availability of Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS as the newest update to this long-term support series.

    Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS incorporates the latest stable bug/security fixes into the release ISOs and also pulls in the "hardware enablement stack" from Ubuntu 19.04. For Ubuntu 18.04.3 desktop users this means having an updated Mesa and other components, most prominently being the switch from Linux 4.18 now to using Linux 5.0.

Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Arrives with Linux Kernel 5.0

  • Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Arrives with Linux Kernel 5.0

    Ubuntu 18.04.3 is the third of five point releases planned to accompany the latest Ubuntu long-term support release, and is the second to see release this year.

    If you’re sure what the point of a point release is I can explain it to you in one simple word: convenience.

    Ubuntu point releases are new .iso install images which contain all of the bug fixes, security patches, performance enhancements, and key app updates released to the OS since the previous install image was produced.

More on Ubuntu LTS Update

  • Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

    Like previous LTS series, 18.04.3 includes hardware enablement stacks for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images.

    Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel; however you may select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

    As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 18.04.3 (Bionic Beaver) LTS is Released With 5.0 kernel

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS, the third maintenance update of Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS.

    This release includes hardware enablement stacks (HWE kernel) that support for newer hardware.

    It brought Linux kernel v5.0, which is one of the major improvement in this release.

    This enables the latest hardware and peripherals available from IBM, Intel, and others.

    This point release comes with updated software, updated installation media, security updates, and other high-impact bugs.

    It’s fully compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and also it improves the stability and performance.

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years until April 2023.

  • Lubuntu 18.04.3 Released!

    Lubuntu is an official Ubuntu flavor which uses the Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment (LXDE). The project’s goal is to provide a lightweight yet functional Linux distribution based on a rock solid Ubuntu base. Lubuntu specifically targets older machines with lower resources, but also runs great on newer hardware. Along with a simple but usable graphical user interface, Lubuntu comes with a wide variety of applications chosen for their small footprint so you can browse, email, chat, play, and be productive.

Enhanced Livepatch desktop integration available with Ubuntu

  • Enhanced Livepatch desktop integration available with Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS

    Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS has just been released. For the Desktop, newer stable versions of GNOME components have been included, as well as a new feature – Livepatch desktop integration.

    As usual with LTS point releases, the main changes are a refreshed hardware enablement stack (newer versions of the kernel, xorg & drivers) and a number of bug and security fixes.

    For those who aren’t familiar, Livepatch is a service which applies critical kernel patches without rebooting. The service is available as part of an Ubuntu Advantage subscription but also made available for free to Ubuntu users (up to 3 machines). Fixes are downloaded and applied to your machine automatically to help reduce downtime and keep your Ubuntu LTS systems secure and compliant. Livepatch is available for servers and desktop.

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A Setback for FOSS in the Public (War) Sector, CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

  • GAO: DoD Not Fully Implementing Open-Source Mandates

    The Department of Defense has not fully implemented mandates from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to increase its use of open-source software and release code, according to a September 10 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report. The report notes that the 2018 NDAA mandated DoD establish a pilot program on open source and a report on the program’s implementation. It also says that OMB’s M-16-21 memorandum requires all agencies to release at least 20 percent of custom-developed code as open-source, with a metric for calculating program performance. However, DoD has released less than 10 percent of its custom code, and had not developed a measure to calculate the performance of the pilot program. In comments to GAO, the DoD CIO’s office said there has been difficulty inventorying all of its custom source code across the department, and disagreement on how to assess the success for a performance measure. While the department worked to partially implement OMB’s policy, the department had not yet issued a policy.

  • Pentagon moves slowly on open-source software mandate amid security concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit.

  • DOD struggles to implement open source software pilots

    The Department of Defense’s congressionally mandated efforts to create an open source software program aren’t going so well. DOD must release at least 20 percent of its custom software as open source through a pilot required by a 2016 Office of Management and Budget directive and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act. Open source software, OMB says, can encourage collaboration, “reduce costs, streamline development, apply uniform standards, and ensure consistency in creating and delivering information.”

  • DOD drags feet with open-source software program due to security, implementation concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit. Since 2016, DOD has been required by law to implement an open-source software pilot program in accordance with policy established by the Office of Management and Budget.

  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

    The CONNECT project, an open source project that aims to increase interoperability among organizations, is transitioning from federal stewardship to the private sector and will soon be available to everyone. Developed ten years ago by a group of federal agencies in the Federal Health Architecture (FHA), CONNECT was a response to ONC’s original approach to a health information network. The agencies decided to build a joint health interoperability solution instead of having each agency develop its own custom solution, and they chose to make the project open source.

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