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China: Baidu, Huawei and HarmonyOS

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OSS
  • Baidu Open-Sources ERNIE 2.0, Beats BERT in Natural Language Processing Tasks

    In a recent blog post, Baidu, the Chinese search engine and e-commerce giant, announced their latest open-source, natural language understanding framework called ERNIE 2.0. They also shared recent test results, including achieving state-of-the art (SOTA) results and outperforming existing frameworks, including Google’s BERT and XLNet in 16 NLP tasks in both Chinese and English.

  • Huawei doesn't see open source as the fix for spying accusations (but they should)

    Networking equipment is one of the last bastions of technology where opaque, proprietary, closed-source hardware continues to thrive. This opacity—combined with networking equipment functioning as the backbone of enterprise computing—creates a fertile breeding ground for fear, uncertainty, and doubt to proliferate. As a result of this, Huawei has spent nearly a decade embattled by accusations of spying for the Chinese government, and since May, a blacklisting.

    As a quick historical review, in April, a Bloomberg report claimed evidence of a "backdoor" in Huawei networking equipment, which turned out to be an exposed Telnet interface—a problem found in networking equipment from a variety of vendors, including Cisco, over the last five years. Despite this being a common problem, Bloomberg's Tim Culpan breathlessly declared it a "smoking gun" in a companion editorial.

  • China to launch its first open-source foundation

    China's first open-source foundation will be launched in about a month or two, said Huawei after it released its open-source HarmonyOS on Friday.

    The foundation, yet to be named, will be led by Huawei and is seen as a follow-up step for China to build a software developer ecosystem and a complete industry chain.

    China's first open-source foundation will officially start operation in a month or two, Wang Chenglu, president of the Huawei Consumer Business Group software division, told the Global Times on Saturday.

    The foundation is expected to provide a lucrative environment for Chinese software developers, and gather their strength to help the country's electronic information industry to break their bottlenecks in chipset making and OS development, according to observers.

  • Huawei Announces New Open-Source Operating System ‘Harmony’

    Huawei unveiled a new operating system called “Harmony” at the company’s 2019 developer conference on Friday, marking the Chinese smartphone giant’s latest step toward creating its own software ecosystem.

    Known as Hongmeng in Chinese, HarmonyOS is a microkernel-based, distributed operating system that can be used on smartphones, wearable devices, laptops, and other devices, the company said.

  • Huawei announces open source Harmony OS

    Huawei has unveiled its own operating system, called Harmony OS, that has been in development for several years.

    Following potential problems with access to Google’s Android OS, Huawei seems to have stepped up efforts to introduce its own OS.

    The company will show off Harmony OS on the Honor Vision TV, but for now, Android remains the preferred mobile OS for Huawei smartphones and tablets.

    Harmony is designed to work on devices from tablets, phones, smartwatches, cars and other devices including smart TVs.

  • Huawei announces open-source Harmony OS, in case they need it

    Ever since the American Presidential order to ban Huawei from US networks and temporarily from US industry, the Chinese mega-corporation has been working on resourcing their own hardware and software components for their devices so as to be unreliant on any other economy – a big aspect of which is the creation of their own operating system for all their devices.

    Introducing ‘Harmony OS‘, following months of speculation and a few leaks of an Android-adjacent ‘HongMeng‘ or ‘Ark’ OS, Huawei has finally unveiled their new open-source operating system developed in parallel with Android in more ways than one.

  • Huawei unveils open source HarmonyOS for consumer devices

    Android developers will be able to port their Android apps to HarmonyOS with Huawei's ARK compiler.

  • Huawei’s Android Alternative “Harmony OS” Will Be Open Source

    After so many ups and downs in the last few months, Huawei finally took to the stage and announced its much-awaited Android alternative called Harmony OS, or Hongmeng OS (as known in China), or ArkOS if you want to call it by other names.

    The said OS is known to be under development since 2012, but initially, Huawei intended to put it on IoT devices. Almost two years back, the company transformed it into a multi-platform offering. Probably because Huawei got an idea of what the future had in store.

"Compatible with other systems like Linux, Unix and Android"

  • Huawei launches smart TV running on HarmonyOS

    "The use of quad-core CPU and GPU in the screen leads the industry in multi-tasking abilities as algorithms determine the quality of image display," Zhao said.

    Apart from the Honor smart screen, the HarmonyOS will also be used in more smart devices such as PCs, smartphones, smart watches and in-vehicle systems.

    As a microkernel-based and distributed operating system designed for various devices and scenarios, the HarmonyOS will be compatible with other systems like Linux, Unix and Android, according to Huawei's Consumer Business Group CEO Richard Yu.

    The company plans to launch its premium-branded Huawei Smart Screen in September.

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  • GAO: DoD Not Fully Implementing Open-Source Mandates

    The Department of Defense has not fully implemented mandates from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to increase its use of open-source software and release code, according to a September 10 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report. The report notes that the 2018 NDAA mandated DoD establish a pilot program on open source and a report on the program’s implementation. It also says that OMB’s M-16-21 memorandum requires all agencies to release at least 20 percent of custom-developed code as open-source, with a metric for calculating program performance. However, DoD has released less than 10 percent of its custom code, and had not developed a measure to calculate the performance of the pilot program. In comments to GAO, the DoD CIO’s office said there has been difficulty inventorying all of its custom source code across the department, and disagreement on how to assess the success for a performance measure. While the department worked to partially implement OMB’s policy, the department had not yet issued a policy.

  • Pentagon moves slowly on open-source software mandate amid security concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit.

  • DOD struggles to implement open source software pilots

    The Department of Defense’s congressionally mandated efforts to create an open source software program aren’t going so well. DOD must release at least 20 percent of its custom software as open source through a pilot required by a 2016 Office of Management and Budget directive and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act. Open source software, OMB says, can encourage collaboration, “reduce costs, streamline development, apply uniform standards, and ensure consistency in creating and delivering information.”

  • DOD drags feet with open-source software program due to security, implementation concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit. Since 2016, DOD has been required by law to implement an open-source software pilot program in accordance with policy established by the Office of Management and Budget.

  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

    The CONNECT project, an open source project that aims to increase interoperability among organizations, is transitioning from federal stewardship to the private sector and will soon be available to everyone. Developed ten years ago by a group of federal agencies in the Federal Health Architecture (FHA), CONNECT was a response to ONC’s original approach to a health information network. The agencies decided to build a joint health interoperability solution instead of having each agency develop its own custom solution, and they chose to make the project open source.

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