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IBM/Red Hat, Fedora and Servers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality

    It’s important to make the distinction between open hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments. A hybrid cloud features coordination between the tasks running in the different environments. Multi-cloud, on the other hand, simply uses different clouds without coordinating or orchestrating tasks among them.

    Red Hat solutions are certified on all major cloud providers, including Alibaba Cloud, Amazon Web Services, the Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud, and Microsoft Azure. As you’re defining your hybrid cloud strategy, you can be confident that you won’t be going it alone as you work with a cloud provider. You won’t be the first person to try things on Cloud x; you’ll have the promise of a proven provider that works with your hybrid architecture.

  • Successful OpenShift 4.1 Disconnected install

    My new position has me working with Red Hat customers in the financial services industry. These customers have strict regulations for controlling access to machines. When it comes to installing OpenShift, we often are deploying into an environment that we call “Air Gapped.” What this means in practice is that all install media need to be present inside the data center, and cannot be fetched from online on demand. This approach is at odds with the conveniences of doing an on-demand repository pull of a container image. Most of the effort involves setting up intern registries and repositories, and getting X509 certificates properly created and deployed to make access to those repositories secure.

    The biggest things we learned is that automation counts. When you need to modify a file, take the time to automate how you modify it. That way, when you need to do it again (which you will) you don’t make a mistake in the modification. In our case, we were following a step-by-step document that got us about halfway through before we realized we made a mistake. Once we switched from manual edits to automated, we were far more likely to rollback to a VM snapshot and roll forward to make progress. At this point, things really started getting smoother.

  • NEST 2.18.0 (and 2.16.0) are ready for use on NeuroFedora

    After a bit of work and testing, NEST 2.18.0 and 2.16.0 are now both available for use on NeuroFedora.

  • Capture and playback UDP packets

    Generating some random statsd communication is easy, it’s text-based UDP protocol and all you need to have is netcat. However things change when statsd server is integrated with real application flodding it with thousands of packets of various attributes.

  • Apache Hive vs. Apache HBase: Which is the query performance champion?

    It's super easy to get lost in the world of big data technologies. There are so many of them that it seems a day never passes without the advent of a new one. Still, such fast development is only half the trouble. The real problem is that it's difficult to understand the functionality and the intended use of the existing technologies.

    To find out what technology suits their needs, IT managers often contrast them. We've also conducted an academic study to make a clear distinction between Apache Hive and Apache HBase—two important technologies that are frequently used in Hadoop implementation projects.

  • Geeking outside the office

    Sysadmins have plush, easy desk jobs, right? We sit in a nice climate-controlled office and type away in our terminals, never really forced to exert ourselves. At least, it might look that way. As I write this during a heat wave here in my hometown, I'm certainly grateful for my air-conditioned office.

    Being a sysadmin, though, carries a lot of stress that people don't see. Most sysadmins have some level of on call. In some, places it's a rotation. In others, it's 24/7. That's because some industries demand a quick response, and others maybe a little less. We're also expected to know everything and solve problems quickly. I could write a whole separate article on how keeping calm in an emergency is a pillar of a good sysadmin.

    The point I'm trying to make is that we are, in fact, under a lot of pressure, and we need to keep it together. While in some cases profit margins are at stake, in other cases lives could be. Let's face it, in this digital world almost everything depends on a sysadmin to keep the lights on. Maintaining all of this infrastructure pushes many sysadmins (and network admins, and especially information security professionals) to the brink of burnout.

    So, this article addresses how getting away from the day job can help you keep your sanity.

  • Rook v1.0 Adds Support for Ceph Nautilus, EdgeFS, and NFS Operator

    Rook, a storage orchestrator for Kubernetes, has released version 1.0 for production-ready workloads that use file, block, and object storage in containers. Highlights of Rook 1.0 include support for storage providers through operators like Ceph Nautilus, EdgeFS, and NFS. For instance, when a pod requests an NFS file system, Rook can provision it without any manual intervention.

    Rook was the first storage project accepted into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and it helps storage administrators to automate everyday tasks like provisioning, configuration, disaster recovery, deployment, and upgrading storage providers. Rook turns a distributed file system into storage services that scale and heal automatically by leveraging the Kubernetes features with the operator pattern. When administrators use Rook with a storage provider like Ceph, they only have to worry about declaring the desired state of the cluster and the operator will be responsible for setting up and configuring the storage layer in the cluster.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Underworld Ascendant, Dark Envoy and Elite Dangerous

  • Underworld Ascendant's Linux port has now been released

    Get ready to dungeon crawl! After many delays, the sequel to the classic Ultima Underworld games has finally seen a Linux release.

  • Event Horizon (Tower of Time) show off the first gameplay from their next RPG Dark Envoy

    Ah Gamescom has arrived, which means tons of games will be shown off over the next week. Event Horizon (Tower of Time dev) are getting in on the action, to show off footage from their brand new RPG called Dark Envoy. For those who missed the previous article, it is already confirmed to be coming to Linux. To save you a click, when asked they said "We spent a considerable effort to make Tower of Time run well on Linux - so now, being more experienced with it, we also plan to release on Linux at the same time as PC launch.".

  • Going where no Steam Play has gone before with Elite Dangerous

    What’s the one game keeping you a dual booter? Maybe it’s PUBG, or Rainbow Six: Siege? Maybe it used to be Overwatch? For me, that game was Elite Dangerous, and one year on from Proton’s release, I have a story to tell. There’s a certain “je ne sais quoi” about Elite Dangerous that I’ve never been able to put my finger on. It’s a game set in a scientifically modelled, full-scale replica of the whole Milky Way galaxy, and as with that setting, the game is truly vast, remarkably cold, and frequently incomprehensible. Yet, when playing Elite, I get the same feeling as when looking up at the stars on a dark and moonless night — my hungry soul is fed. Or it could just be space madness. Regardless, it’s a feeling that I like to dip into every once in a while, immerse myself in, and try not to drown.

Red Hat and Fedora: HPC, Ansible and More Flock Reports

  • HPC workloads in containers: Comparison of container run-times

    Recently, I worked on an interesting project to evaluate different container run-times for high-performance computing (HPC) clusters. HPC clusters are what we once knew as supercomputers. Today, instead of giant mainframes, they are hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands of massively parallel systems. Since performance is critical, virtualization with tools like virtual machines or Docker containers was not realistic. The overhead was too much compared to bare metal.

  • A project manager's guide to Ansible

    For project managers, it's important to know that deploying Ansible will improve the effectiveness of a company's IT. Employees will spend less time trying to troubleshoot their own configuration, deployment, and provisioning. Ansible is designed to be a straightforward, reliable way to automate a network's IT tasks. Further, development teams can use the Ansible Tower to track applications from development to production. Ansible Tower includes everything from role-based access to graphical inventory management and enables teams to remain on the same page even with complex tasks. Ansible has a number of fantastic use cases and provides substantial productivity gains for both internal teams and the IT infrastructure as a whole. It's free, easy to use, and robust. By automating IT with Ansible, project managers will find that their teams can work more effectively without the burden of having to manage their own IT—and that IT works more smoothly overall.

  • Flock to Fedora ?19

    I had a wonderful opportunity to go to Fedora’s annual contributor summit, Flock to Fedora in Budapest, Hungary. This is me penning down my takeaway from a week full of learning! [...] Apart from the talks, the conference outshone when it came to meeting mind-blowing developers. I got to know the most about Fedora and Red Hat through those interactions and it was a really pleasant experience. It was also super amazing to finally meet all the people I had been interacting with over the course of the internship in real life. My advice for any future Flock attendee would be to always make time to talk to people at Flock. Even I have a hard time interacting but the people are extremely nice and you get to learn a lot through those small interactions and end up making friends for a life time. Definitely taking back a tonne of memories, loads of pictures, and plethora of learning from this one week of experience.

  • Paul W. Frields: Flock 2019 in Budapest, Hungary.

    Last week I attended the Flock 2019 conference in Budapest, like many Fedora community members. There was a good mix of paid and volunteer community members at the event. That was nice to see, because I often worry about the overall aging of the community. Many people I know in Fedora have been with the project a long time. Over time, people’s lives change. Their jobs, family, or other circumstances move them in different directions. Sometimes this means they have less time for volunteer work, and they might not be active in a community like Fedora. So being able to refresh my view of who’s around and interested in an event like Flock was helpful. Also, at last year’s Flock in Dresden, after the first night of the conference, something I ate got the better of me — or I might have picked up a norovirus. I was out of commission for most of the remaining time, confined to my room to ride out whatever was ailing my gut. (It wasn’t pretty.) So I was glad this year also to be perfectly well, and able to attend the whole event. That was despite trying this terrible, terrible libation called ArchieMite, provided by my buddy Dennis Gilmore... [...] I also attended several sessions on Modularity. One of them was Merlin Mathesius’ presentation on tools for building modules. Merlin is on my team at Red Hat and I happened to know he hadn’t done a lot of public speaking. But you wouldn’t have guessed from his talk! It was well organized and logically presented. He gave a nice overview of how maintainers can use the available tools to build modules for community use. The Modularity group also held a discussion to hear about friction points with modularity. Much of the feedback lined up well with other inputs the group has received. We could solve some with better documentation and awareness. In some cases the tools could benefit from ease of use enhancements. In others, people were unaware of the difficult design decisions or choices that had to be made to produce a workable system. Fortunately there are some fixes on the way for tooling like the replacement for the so-called “Ursa Major” in Fedora. It allows normal packages to build against capabilities provided by modules.

Programming Leftovers

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn Groovy

    Apache Groovy is a powerful, optionally typed and dynamic language, with static-typing and static compilation capabilities, for the Java platform aimed at improving developer productivity thanks to a concise, familiar and easy to learn syntax. It integrates seamlessly with any Java program, and immediately delivers to your application powerful features, including scripting capabilities, Domain-Specific Language authoring, runtime and compile-time meta-programming and functional programming. It’s both a static and dynamic language with features similar to those of Python, Ruby, Perl, and Smalltalk. It can be used as both a programming language and a scripting language for the Java Platform.

  • Top 9 Django Concepts - Part 2 : 5 Mins

    I will be covering 3 Django concepts, for those who had missed the first part of the 3 part series, you can head down to the Top 9 Django Concepts - Part 1 The first concept is essential Django commands that you will be using when developing in Django. The second is the concept of using either a front-end like Vue, React or Angular web framework or using Django existing template system to build UI.

  • Get Current Date & Time in Python

    In this article, you will learn the datetime module supplies classes for manipulating dates and times in both simple and complex ways.

  • RcppQuantuccia 0.0.3

    RcppQuantuccia brings the Quantuccia header-only subset / variant of QuantLib to R. At the current stage, it mostly offers date and calendaring functions. This release was triggered by some work CRAN is doing on updating C++ standards for code in the repository. Notably, under C++11 some constructs such ptr_fun, bind1st, bind2nd, … are now deprecated, and CRAN prefers the code base to not issue such warnings (as e.g. now seen under clang++-9). So we updated the corresponding code in a good dozen or so places to the (more current and compliant) code from QuantLib itself.

7 of the Best IoT Projects Using Arduino

If you’re an electronics hobbyist, chances are you’ve heard of the Arduino. It’s a tiny computer that you can use to do surprisingly complex things. It also happens to be behind a fair number of Internet of Things projects. While some people reach a for Raspberry Pi or something even more powerful, an Arduino or Arduino Uno might be all you need. We’ve put together a list of IoT projects that prove this to be true. Read more Also: mDash Cloud platform for IoT Devices Targets ESP8266/ESP32, STM32, and TI CC3220 Wireless MCUs