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Vulkan: SIGGRAPH 2019 News and NVIDIA Focus

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Continues To Be Involved With Making Vulkan More Appropriate For Machine Learning

    NVIDIA engineers continue to be among those in the Vulkan technical sub-group working to advance machine learning for this API.

    Vulkan machine learning is being worked on for functionality like NVIDIA's DLSS, bots, character animations, and other functionality that can be tailored to machine learning in high frame-rate applications. There's also the benefit of Vulkan being an industry standard unlike CUDA and friends.

  • NVIDIA 435.17 Linux Beta Driver Adds Vulkan + OpenGL PRIME Render Offload

    NVIDIA this morning introduced their 435 Linux driver series currently in beta form with the release of the 435.17 Linux build. With this new driver comes finally the best PRIME/multi-GPU support they have presented to date.

    The NVIDIA 435.17 driver has a new PRIME render offload implementation supported for Vulkan and OpenGL (with GLX). This PRIME offloading is about using one GPU for display but having the actual rendering be done on a secondary GPU, as is common with many of today's high-end notebooks that have Intel integrated graphics paired with a discrete NVIDIA GPU.

  • Vulkan Video Decoding Coming In H1'2020, Ray-Tracing Progressing

    The Khronos Group has posted their material from the SIGGRAPH 2019 graphics conference and includes some interesting updates on Vulkan and their ongoing efforts.

    In addition to making Vulkan better for machine learning, ray-tracing and video decode are two other topics of interest to us.

Liam Dawe's coverage

  • NVIDIA have released the 435.17 beta driver with Vulkan and OpenGL support for PRIME render offload

    NVIDIA have a little present available for Linux fans today, with the release of the 435.17 beta driver now being available.

    This is a beta driver and it includes quite the highlight with the addition of PRIME render offload support for Vulkan and OpenGL. This is where you might have your Intel GPU running most normal applications, with an NVIDIA chip then powering your games. It's usually found in Notebooks and it's been a source of annoyance for NVIDIA Notebook owners for a long time, so it's really pleasing to see proper progress like this.

NVIDIA 435.17 Linux Beta Driver Adds PRIME Offloading For Vulkan

  • NVIDIA 435.17 Linux Beta Driver Adds PRIME Offloading For Vulkan and OpenGL+GLX

    The latest NVIDIA 435.17 Linux beta driver has added Vulkan and OpenGL+GLX support for PRIME render offload.

    PRIME is a collection of features in the Linux kernel, display server, and various drivers to enable GPU offloading with multi-GPU configurations under Linux, like laptops using NVIDIA Optimus (which use an integrated Intel GPU and a discrete NVIDIA GPU).

    Thanks to the new on-demand PRIME render offload, you'll be able to run specific application on the discrete NVIDIA GPU, while using the integrated GPU for everything else, saving battery power.

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