Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) I/O Scheduler Improves Linux Systems Responsiveness (Video)

Filed under
Linux

Storage is normally the slowest part of a system, and operating systems such as Linux try to limit I/O access with "tricks" like caching. The I/O.

Read more

Also: RapidDisk version 6.0-1 released

More in Tux Machines

LWN Articles About Linux (Kernel): Linux Plumbers Conference, Staging, Linux Conference North America, Stable Statistics

  • Topics from the Open Printing microconference

    On day two of the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, two of the principals behind the Open Printing project led the very first Open Printing microconference. Project leader Till Kamppeter and program manager Aveek Basu described the current state of printing on Linux and some of the plans for the future, including supporting scanning for multi-function devices. The picture they painted was rosy, at least for printing, which may not quite match the experience of many Linux users. As with many projects, though, Open Printing is starved for contributors—something that was reflected in the sparse attendance at the microconference. Basu began by pointing out that some attendees had likely printed their boarding passes from Linux, which highlights the importance of printing for Linux. People use it for bank documents, transport tickets, and more. He has been at Lexmark for 11 years, working on printing for Linux, macOS, and other Unix-based systems. Kamppeter said that he has been the Open Printing leader since 2001. The idea of the project is to do everything possible to make printing "just work" with Linux and other operating systems; the goal is "plug and print".

  • What happens to kernel staging-tree code

    The staging tree was added to the kernel in 2008 for the 2.6.28 development cycle as a way to ease the process of getting substandard device drivers into shape and merged into the mainline. It has been followed by controversy for just about as long. The recent disagreements over the EROFS and exFAT filesystems have reignited many of the arguments over whether the staging tree is beneficial to the kernel community or not. LWN cannot answer that question, but we can look into what has transpired in the staging tree in its first eleven years to see if there are any conclusions to be drawn there. The core idea behind the staging tree is that it is open to code that does not live up to the normal standards for inclusion into the kernel. Once a driver is added there, it is available to anybody who is brave enough to try to make use of it, but the real purpose is to allow developers to improve the code to the point that it is ready to go into the kernel proper. It serves as an easy place for new developers to try out simple changes and, when it works well, it helps the kernel to gain hardware support that might otherwise languish out-of-tree indefinitely.

  • The USB debugging arsenal

    At the 2019 Embedded Linux Conference North America, which was held in San Diego in August, Krzysztof Opasiak gave a presentation on demystifying the ways to monitor—and even change—USB traffic on a Linux system. He started with the basics of the USB protocol and worked up into software and hardware tools to observe, modify, and fuzz the messages that get sent. Those tools are part of the arsenal that is available to those interested in looking deeply into USB. Opasiak works in Poland for what he called a "small Korean company" (Samsung). He noted that it is not that easy to sniff USB traffic and that the ways to do so are not well known. But "there are no dragons"; nothing bad will happen if you do so. In some ways, USB is like the internet and some of the same tools can be used for both.

  • 5.3 Kernel development cycle statistics

    It's that time of the development cycle again: work on the 5.3 kernel is winding down with an expected final release date of September 15. Read on for LWN's traditional look at where the code in 5.3 came from in this relatively busy development cycle. As of this writing, 14,435 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for 5.3; these changes were contributed by 1,846 developers

Kmdr – Display CLI Commands Explanation In Terminal

A while ago, we wrote about ExplainShell, a web-based tool to learn what each part of a Linux command does. It divides the complex and lengthy Linux commands into multiple parts and gives explanation for each part. Using this tool, a Linux newbie can learn about various command line parameters and options without having to refer man pages. However, It will only help you to learn Linux commands. But what if you want to learn other CLI commands, for example Python? You won’t find explanation of Python commands in ExplainShell. No worries! Today, I stumbled upon a similar tool named Kmdr that provides CLI commands explanation for hundreds of programs. It helps you to easily learn CLI commands without leaving the terminal and without having to go through lengthy man pages. Not just Linux commands, Kmdr provides explanation for a lot of CLI commands including ansible, conda, docker, git, go, kubectl, mongo, mysql, npm, ruby gems, vagrant and hundreds of other programs such as those built into bash. Read more

Events: Cloud Foundry Summit EU, 'FOSDEMs', Ubucon Europe, Qt Contributors' Summit and Openwashing

  • CF Summit Panel Discussion: Cloud Foundry Test Kitchen

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Jeff Hobbs of SUSE participated in a re-named “Will it Blend?” panel discussion, talking about whether Kubernetes is the future of Cloud Foundry and how other technologies could potentially be integrated. It seems that Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry did indeed blend and the future is looking bright! Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks from CF Summit EU on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Vlad’s talk below:

  • FOSDEMs bespoke video hardware and software.

    You can see the white hdmi cable running from the lime2 hdmi out to the monitor. This old monitor is my test "projector", the fact that it is 4:3 makes it a good test subject. You can also see a black cable from the capture board to another blue board with a red led. This is a banana-pi M1 as this is the current SBC being used in the FOSDEM video boxes, and i had one lying around anyway, doing nothing. It spews out a test image. What you are seeing here is live captured data at 1280x720@60Hz, displayed on the monitor, and in the background of the status LCD, with a 1 to 2 frame delay.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019: Ubucon talks schedule is live!

    It is now 3 weeks before Ubucon starts, and what better way to remind everyone that we are ready to go by showing our full schedule! Don’t forget to register to our pre-ubucon cultural events if you want to know a little bit more of Sintra, and don’t forget as well to register for the event if you would like to receive some swag! All of this would not be possible without the support of our sponsors and the participation of volunteers and speakers for which we are very grateful.

  • Qt Contributors' Summit 2019

    The Qt Contributors' Summit is an annual event open to anyone who has contributed toward the Qt project in the past year. Contributions can include code, helping on the forum, maintaining the wiki, or any other form of moving the Qt project forward. After visiting beautiful Oslo in June last year, we invite you this year to the premises of The Qt Company in Berlin-Adlershof. And because of Qt 6 on the horizon, we have extended the event to three days! The first day will be all about sharing a common vision, while the following two days will be organized as an Unconference. We will have plenty of space to allow you to meet, collaborate, and get stuff done.

  • Alluxio Announces First ‘Data Orchestration Summit’ [Ed: Corporate 'summit' with lots of openwashing]

    This event also brings together creators of open source technologies and leaders in cloud to discuss the latest solutions to today’s biggest data problems.

Samba 4.11

  • Samba 4.11.0 Available for Download
    Samba 4.11 has changed how the AD database is stored on disk. AD users should
    not really be affected by this change when upgrading to 4.11. However, AD
    users should be extremely careful if they need to downgrade from Samba 4.11 to
    an older release.
    
    Samba 4.11 maintains database compatibility with older Samba releases. The
    database will automatically get rewritten in the new 4.11 format when you
    first start the upgraded samba executable.
    
    However, when downgrading from 4.11 you will need to manually downgrade the AD
    database yourself. Note that you will need to do this step before you install
    the downgraded Samba packages. For more details, see:
    https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Downgrading_an_Active_Directory_DC
    
    When either upgrading or downgrading, users should also avoid making any
    database modifications between installing the new Samba packages and starting
    the samba executable.
    
  • Samba 4.11 Released With Much Better Scalability While Disabling SMB1 By Default

    Samba 4.11 is out as the latest big feature update to this SMB/CIFS/AD implementation for offering better Windows interoperability with Linux and other platforms. The changes in Samba 4.11 are aplenty that we are a bit surprised it wasn't called Samba 5.0. Perhaps most exciting is Samba 4.11 having big scalability improvements to the point that it should be able to scale to 100,000+ users.