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A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

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Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Programming: Bash, Python, Java, Encodings

  • How to program with Bash: Logical operators and shell expansions

    Bash is a powerful programming language, one perfectly designed for use on the command line and in shell scripts. This three-part series (which is based on my three-volume Linux self-study course) explores using Bash as a programming language on the command-line interface (CLI). The first article explored some simple command-line programming with Bash, including using variables and control operators. This second article looks into the types of file, string, numeric, and miscellaneous logical operators that provide execution-flow control logic and different types of shell expansions in Bash. The third and final article in the series will explore the for, while, and until loops that enable repetitive operations. Logical operators are the basis for making decisions in a program and executing different sets of instructions based on those decisions. This is sometimes called flow control.

  • Initializing arrays in Java

    People who have experience programming in languages like C or FORTRAN are familiar with the concept of arrays. They’re basically a contiguous block of memory where each location is a certain type: integers, floating-point numbers, or what-have-you. The situation in Java is similar, but with a few extra wrinkles.

  • Python array list’s count method

    In this example, we will use the count method from the Python array list to decide which phrase to return from a function that will accept an array list consists of good and bad ideas. In the below example, you need to decide which phrase to return from the array list which consists of good ideas ‘good’ and bad ideas ‘bad’. If there are one or two good ideas, return ‘Publish!’, if there are more than 2 return ‘I smell a series!’. If there are no good ideas, as is often the case, return ‘Fail!’.

  • Jakarta EE: What’s in store for Enterprise JavaBeans?

    Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has been very important to the Java EE ecosystem and promoted many robust solutions to enterprise problems. Besides that, in the past when integration techniques were not so advanced, EJB did great work with remote EJB, integrating many Java EE applications. However, remote EJB is not necessary anymore, and we have many techniques and tools that are better for doing that. So, does EJB still have a place in this new cloud-native world? Before writing this post, I did an informal survey via Twitter poll to hear what the community thinks about it. In this article, I’ll share the results of the survey as well as some discussion that emerged as part of the poll. Additionally, I’ll share my opinions on the topic.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.22: More goodies!

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, and spookyhash algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at 868k monthly downloads) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation. This release comes pretty much exactly one month after the very nice 0.6.21 release but contains five new pull requests. Matthew de Queljoe did a little bit of refactoring of the vectorised digest function he added in 0.6.21. Ion Suruceanu added a CFB cipher for AES. Bill Denney both corrected and extended sha1. And Jim Hester made the windows-side treatment of filenames UTF-8 compliant.

  • Pleasures of Tibetan input and typesetting with TeX

    Many years ago I decided to learn Tibetan (and the necessary Sanskrit), and enrolled in the university studies of Tibetology in Vienna. Since then I have mostly forgotten Tibetan due to absolute absence of any practice, save for regular consultations from a friend on how to typeset Tibetan.  [...] In former times we used ctib to typeset Tibetan, but the only font that was usable with it is a bit clumsy, and there are several much better fonts now available. Furthermore, always using transliterated input instead of the original Tibetan text might be a problem for people outside academics of Tibetan. If we want to use one of these (obviously) ttf/otf fonts, a switch to either XeTeX or LuaTeX is required.

Episodes: Deus Ex & DevOps, Linux in the Ham Shack, and Python Podcast

  • Deus Ex & DevOps Episode 1
  • LHS Episode #308: Ciao, Enzo

    Welcome to Episode 308 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topic episode, the hosts discuss the JOTA/JOTI weekend, Homebrew Heroes, youths as the future of amateur radio, GNU, Perl, OpenLibra, open hardware, FOSS satellites and much more. Thank you for tuning in. We appreciate you all.

  • Illustrating The Landscape And Applications Of Deep Learning

    Deep learning is a phrase that is used more often as it continues to transform the standard approach to artificial intelligence and machine learning projects. Despite its ubiquity, it is often difficult to get a firm understanding of how it works and how it can be applied to a particular problem. In this episode Jon Krohn, author of Deep Learning Illustrated, shares the general concepts and useful applications of this technique, as well as sharing some of his practical experience in using it for his work. This is definitely a helpful episode for getting a better comprehension of the field of deep learning and when to reach for it in your own projects.

Microsoft Privacy Violations

  • Euro data watchdog has 'serious concerns' as to whether EU deals with Microsoft obey GDPR

    The way Windows 10 is configured is critical, and the report concludes that if the Timeline is disabled and telemetry set to the lowest level, there are "no high data protection risks resulting from the diagnostic data collection in Windows 10". The Dutch report on Office 365 is less positive, particularly with regard to Office mobile apps and Office Online, for which "five high data protection risks" are identified. "Until Microsoft takes measures to mitigate these risks, government organisations should refrain from using Office Online and the mobile Office apps included in Office 365 licence," it states. There is also advice that "in order to prevent continued vendor lock-in, government organisations are advised to conduct a pilot with alternative open-source productivity software". That said, if all recommended measures are followed, "there are no more known high data protection risks for data subjects related to the collection of data about the use of Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus", it concludes. In July 2019, the Dutch government published a "State of Play" memo [PDF] indicating that Microsoft had largely resolved the issues which prevented Office from meeting GDPR requirements. "Microsoft has now made the most urgent changes in accordance with the improvement plan. These were tested by SLM Microsoft Rijk in June 2019 and found to be in order," it says. This explains why the EDPS now states that the agreement forged between Microsoft and the Dutch government is a model for the rest of the EU. "The EDPS is of the opinion that such solutions should be extended not only to all public and private bodies in the EU, which is our short-term expectation, but also to individuals."

  • EU's Microsoft probe throws up 'serious concerns' over GDPR compliance

    "Though the investigation is still ongoing, preliminary results reveal serious concerns over the compliance of the relevant contractual terms with data protection rules and the role of Microsoft as a processor for EU institutions using its products and services," it said.

  • EU data watchdog raises concerns over Microsoft contracts

    Microsoft’s (MSFT.O) contracts with European Union institutions do not fully protect data in line with EU law, the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) said in initial findings published on Monday. [...] The EU introduced new rules on data protection in 2018, known as GDPR, applicable to all companies operating in the bloc and designed to give individuals more control over their personal data and to create a more level playing field for businesses. “We are committed to helping our customers comply with GDPR, Regulation 2018/1725 and other applicable laws,” a Microsoft spokesman said. “We are in discussions with our customers in the EU institutions and will soon announce contractual changes that will address concerns such as those raised by the EDPS.” The EDPS has worked with the Dutch ministry of justice, which carried out risk assessments last June and found that public authorities in member states face similar issues The two have since set up a forum designed to set up fair rules for public administrations. The EDPS said there is “significant scope” for improvement of contracts with powerful software developers and that contractual terms and technical safeguards agreed between the Dutch ministry and Microsoft were a positive step forwards.

Open source database use is a growing trend

Open source databases are a growing segment of the overall database management system market, but according to a new survey, users are working with multiple databases adapted for specific purposes and not looking at single databases as multi-purpose. The Open Source Data Management Software survey was conducted by Percona, a vendor based in Raleigh, N.C. that provides supported versions of multiple open source database platforms including PostgreSQL, MySQL and MongoDB. Some 92% of survey respondents saying they are using multiple database technologies, with 89% using more than one open source database platform. The study, conducted earlier this year, also found that cloud deployments are a growing trend, with more than 50% running at least one workload in the public cloud. "It's hard for one database to do everything well, so the trend is definitely to use the best database for the job, rather than try and fit into a single technology," said Matt Yonkovit, chief experience officer at Percona. Read more Also: Sourcehut Q3 2019 Financial report