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Sharing/Collaboration/Open Data/Open Access

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  • 3D printing organs may soon be a reality via a new open-source technique – Future Blink

    Bioengineers at Rice University created entangled cardiovascular networks similar to the body's natural passageways.

  • Global reinsurance experts urge investment in open-source risk models

    Strategic management experts say greater collaboration between the insurance industry and state policy makers, including investment in open-source risk models, could improve society's ability to recover from disasters linked to climate change.

  • Flume Kicks Off Open Source FlumeSounds Project

    Australian #1 bad boy of EDM Flume made a surprise project announcement FlumeSounds yesterday. He uploaded a near 8-minute video of samples to all his socials for fans and creators to manipulate.

  • Flume announces open-source sample series for producers

    Hot off the release of his new EP, 'Quits', Australian producer Flume has revealed Flume Sounds, an open-source audio loop series for producers.

  • First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

    Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research.

    The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients.

    “The database has the potential to improve treatment for up to half a million people suffering from spinal cord injuries worldwide, and also enhance research in other areas of health, science and rehabilitation,” said Randy Goebel, associate vice-president of research at the U of A.

  • Nationwide project provides free science materials to meet California’s new standards

    While California students began taking a new statewide science test this past spring, school districts were still struggling to get teaching materials aligned to the state’s new science standards into classrooms.

    A new nationwide effort is trying to speed up that process by offering free, open source science materials to teachers and schools.

    In 2017, philanthropists, state leaders and curriculum writers formed OpenSciEd to get materials to teachers implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, new academic standards that emphasize hands-on projects and integrate several scientific disciplines.

    California adopted the new standards in 2013 and this past spring began administering a new state science test. But it wasn’t until last November that the State Board of Education approved a list of recommended textbooks and materials aligned to the new standards for kindergarten through 8th grade.

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today's howtos

KaOS 2020.09

KaOS is pleased to announce the availability of the September release of a new stable ISO. With almost 60 % percent of the packages updated since the last ISO and the last release being over two months old, a new ISO is more than due. News for KDE Applications 20.08 included Dolphin adding thumbnails for 3D Manufacturing Format (3MF) files, you can also see previews of files and folders on encrypted file systems such as Plasma Vaults now remembers and restores the location you were viewing, as well as the open tabs, and split views you had open when you last closed it.Yakuake now lets you configure all the keyboard shortcuts that come from Konsole and there is a new system tray item that shows you when Yakuake is running. Elisa now lets you display all genres, artists, or albums in the sidebar, below other items. As always with this rolling distribution, you will find the very latest packages for the Plasma Desktop, this includes Frameworks 5.74.0, Plasma 5.19.5 and KDE Applications 20.08.1. All built on Qt 5.15.1. Read more

Plasma adventures - 5.19.4 tried and tested

I like the momentum in the Plasma space. The last three years have been phenomenal, and there does not seem to be any fatigue, which typically affects most software projects after a while. Given that Plasma has been chugging on for a looong time now, this is rather impressive. What worries me, though, is that each new version brings in more fragility, more bugs. And this brings me back to the fundamental issue with the Linux desktop. It's simply not robust enough to be a day-to-day system for most people. My mind simply cannot reconcile with breakages and compatibility issues. They feel like the easy way out of difficult situations with legacy models and usage patterns. Instead of creating a smooth transition to whatever the new thing is, what most projects seem to be doing is - break stuff. Why should plasma 5.19 be any less stable than say 5.18 or 5.15 or whatever. All in all, there's decent progress in Plasma, most notably the visuals and the responsiveness of the desktop, but these seem to come at the cost of good ole stability. Hopefully, future versions of Plasma will be able to give us both. That said, despite my grumbling, if you're after a solid desktop, Plasma is still the indubitable winner. Version 5.20 test coming soon! Read more

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