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Google brings Linux app support to some older Chromebooks (including Chromebook Pixel 2015)

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Linux
Google

Chrome OS started out as a browser-based operating system that could run web apps only. Eventually Google added support for Android apps, and then for Linux apps, making Chromebooks more useful as general-purpose laptops.

But while most new Chromebooks feature out-of-the-box support for Android and Linux apps, many older models do not… and it looked like they never would.

It turns out that may not be true after all: 9to5Google reports that Google seems to be testing an update that would bring Linux app support to the 2015 Chromebook Pixel, along with a number of other models released that year.

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2015 Pixel and eight other Chromebooks land Linux apps

  • 2015 Pixel and eight other Chromebooks land Linux apps

    At the center of “kernelnext” is the iconic Pixel Chromebook 2015. Although nearing its end of life, Google’s second iteration Chromebook is still a powerful device with a timeless design. It is fitting that users of the $1000+ Pixel should get a little bit of love from developers and the addition of Linux apps should be a reason to rejoice. A recent report from Kyle Bradshaw reveals that some users are starting to see the “kernelnext” update on their devices which has allowed them to enable the experimental flag that activates Crostini.

Your Older Chromebook, Chromebox, Or Chromebase Will Run Linux

  • Your Older Chromebook, Chromebox, Or Chromebase Will Run Linux Soon

    The ability to use Linux on a Chromebook is going to be the norm from this year forward but now at least eight much older devices are gaining that capability too. Code changes associated with the change were first spotted under the 'KernelNext' project codename earlier this year. But that change is now rolling out to no fewer than eight devices.

    Among Chrome OS gadgets receiving the update are three Chromebox PCs, one Chromebase all-in-one, and four Chromebooks. The first and likely biggest of those updates is already shipping now for Google's Pixel Chromebook. Acer's C670 Chromebook 11 and Chromebook 15 — codenamed Paine and Yuna — as well as Dell's Chromebook 13 7310 and Toshiba's Chromebook 2 — codenamed Lulu and Gandof will see the update soon too.

    For alternative Chrome OS hardware, Acer's Chromebox CXI2, the ASUS Chromebox CN62, and the Lenovo ThinkCentre Chromebox — Rikku, Guadu, and Tidus — are included in the list. Finally, Acer's Chromebase 24 — codenamed Buddy — rounds out the list.

Chrome OS 77 to bring Crostini (Linux beta) to Chromebook Pixel

  • Chrome OS 77 to bring Crostini (Linux beta) to Chromebook Pixel 2015, other older devices

    A few months ago, 9to5 Google reported on “kernelnext” in Chrome OS, with the expectation that it was a way to bring the Linux beta, also known as Project Crostini, to some older Chromebooks. Now, the results of that effort are appearing in early builds of Chrome OS 77, reports 9to5 Google: The Chromebook Pixel 2015 and eight other Chrome OS devices are getting Linux support, thanks to an updated kernel.

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