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The cloud isn't killing open source software

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OSS

The most common reason given for software vendors making these changes is "foul play" by cloud vendors. The argument is that cloud vendors unfairly offer open source software "as a service," capturing large portions of the revenue, while the original software vendor continues to carry most of the development costs. Market rumors claim Amazon Web Services (AWS) makes more revenue from MySQL than Oracle, which owns the product.

So, who is claiming foul play is destroying the open source ecosystem? Typically, the loudest voices are venture-funded open source software companies. These companies require a very high growth rate to justify their hefty valuation, so it makes sense that they would prefer not to worry about additional competition.

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Devices: One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) XO-1.75, PiCAN3 CAN-Bus Board and BeagleBoard