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Linux Foundation: Automotive Grade Linux Announcement and Calling Surveillance Operations "Confidential Computing"

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Linux
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Security
  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces New Instrument Cluster Expert Group and UCB 8.0 Code Release

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), an open source project developing a shared software platform for in-vehicle technology, today announced a new working group focused on Instrument Cluster solutions, as well as the latest code release of the AGL platform, the UCB 8.0.

    The AGL Instrument Cluster Expert Group (EG) is working to reduce the footprint of AGL and optimize the platform for use in lower performance processors and low-cost vehicles that do not require an entire infotainment software stack. Formed earlier this year, the group plans to release design specifications later this year with an initial code release in early 2020.

    “AGL is now supported by nine major automotive manufacturers, including the top three producers by worldwide volume, and is currently being used in production for a range of economy and luxury vehicles” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “The new Instrument Cluster Expert Group, supported by several of these automakers, will expand the use cases for AGL by enabling the UCB platform to support solutions for lower-cost vehicles, including motorcycles.”

  • Shhh! Microsoft, Intel, Google and more sign up to the Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Linux Foundation has signed up the likes of Microsoft and Google for its Confidential Computing Consortium, a group with the laudable goal of securing sensitive data.

    The group – which also includes Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent – will be working on open-source technologies and standards to speed the adoption of confidential computing.

    The theory goes that while approaches to encrypting data at rest and in transit have supposedly been dealt with, assuming one ignores the depressingly relentless splurts of user information from careless vendors, keeping it safe while in use is quite a bit more challenging. Particularly as workloads spread to the cloud and IoT devices.

  • Tech giants come together to form cloud security watchdog

    Some of the world’s biggest technology companies are joining forces to improve the security of files in the cloud. This includes Google, IBM, Microsoft, Intel, and many others.

    The news first popped up on the Linux Foundation, where it was said that the Confidential Computing Consortium will work to bring industry standards and identify the proper tools to encrypt data used by apps, devices and online services.

    At the moment, cloud security solutions focus to protect data that’s either resting, or is in transit. However, when the data is being used is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.”

  • Tech firms join forces to boost cloud security

    Founding members of the group – which unites hardware suppliers, cloud providers, developers, open source experts and academics – include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

    [...]

    “The earliest work on technologies that have the ability to transform an industry is often done in collaboration across the industry and with open source technologies,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation.

    “The Confidential Computing Consortium is a leading indicator of what is to come for security in computing and will help define and build open technologies to support this trust infrastructure for data in use.”

  • Google, Intel and Microsoft form data protection consortium
  • Intel Editorial: Intel Joins Industry Consortium to Accelerate Confidential Computing

    Leaders in information and infrastructure security are well versed in protecting data at-rest or in-flight through a variety of methods. However, data being actively processed in memory is another matter. Whether running on your own servers on-prem, in an edge deployment, or in the heart of a cloud service provider’s data center, this “in-use” data is almost always unencrypted and potentially vulnerable.

  • Confidential Computing: How Big Tech Companies Are Coming Together To Secure Data At All Levels

    Data today moves constantly from on-premises to public cloud and the edge, which is why it is quite challenging to protect. While there are standards available that aim to protect data when it is in rest and transit, standards related to protecting it when in use do not exist. Protecting data while in use is called confidential computing, which the Confidential Computing Consortium is aiming to create across the industry.

    The Confidential Computing Consortium, created under the Linux Foundation, will work to build up guidelines, systems and tools to ensure data is encrypted when it’s being used by applications, devices and online services. The consortium says that encrypting data when in use is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.” Members focused on the undertaking are Alibaba, ARM, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

  • IT giants join forces for full-system data security

    Apple is conspiciously missing from the consortium, despite using both Intel hardware and inhouse designed ARM-based processors.

    Of the first set of commitments, Intel will release its Software Guard Extensions (SGX) software development kit as open source through the CCC.

  • Google, Intel, and Microsoft partner to improve cloud security

    Some of the biggest names in tech have banded together in an effort to promote industry-wide security standards for protecting data in use.

  • Alibaba, Baidu, Google, Microsoft, Others Back Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Confidential Computing Consortium aims to help define and accelerate open-source technology that keeps data in use secure. Data typically gets encrypted by service providers, but not when it’s in use. This consortium will focus on encrypting and processing the data “in memory” to reduce the exposure of the data to the rest of the system. It aims to provide greater control and transparency for users.

  • Microsoft, Intel and others are doubling down on open source Linux security

    In other words, the operating system could be compromised by some kind of malware, but the data being used in a program would still be encrypted, and therefore safe from an attacker.

  • Microsoft, Intel, and Red Hat Back Confidential Computing

    The Linux Foundation’s latest project tackles confidential computing with a group of companies that reads like a who’s who of cloud providers, chipmakers, telecom operators, and other tech giants.

    Today at the Open Source Summit the Linux Foundation said it will form a new group called the Confidential Computing Consortium. Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent all committed to work on the project, which aims to accelerate the adoption of confidential computing.

Automotive Grade Linux and ‘confidential computing’

  • Automotive Grade Linux update clusters up — and IBM’s OpenPower opens up

    The Linux Foundation’s AGL released UCB 8.0 with new improved profiles for telematics and instrument cluster and launched an Instrument Cluster Expert Group. The LF also gobbled up IBM’s OpenPower Foundation as IBM unveiled a royalty-free Power ISA.

    Prior to today’s Embedded Linux Conference and Open Source Summit, the Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) group announced Unified Code Base 8.0, which pushes the AGL spec deeper into telematics and instrument clusters. Also at the San Diego event, the Linux Foundation announced it was converting the IBM-backed OpenPower Foundation into a new LF working group. IBM also announced that it was open sourcing the Power CPU ISA (see farther below).

  • Microsoft, Google, Red Hat and others join forces for cloud security in ‘confidential computing’ group

    The Confidential Computing Consortium, announced this morning by the Linux Foundation, will work to establish standards, frameworks and tools to encrypt data when it’s in use by applications, devices and online services. Current techniques focus on data at rest, and in transit. The group describes encrypting data in use as “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.”

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