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Servers: Databases, Microservices, Stackrox, Docker Block Storage and UNIX Turning 50

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  • Open source databases: Today’s viable alternative for enterprise computing

    There was a time when proprietary solutions from well-capitalized software companies could be expected to provide superior solutions to those produced by a community of dedicated and talented developers. Just as Linux destroyed the market for expensive UNIX versions, open source database management systems like EDB Postgres are forcing Oracle, Microsoft, SAP, and other premium database management products to justify their pricing. With so many large, critical applications running reliably on open source products, it’s a hard case to make.

  • 5 questions everyone should ask about microservices

    The basis of the question is uncertainty in what’s going to happen once they start decomposing existing monolithic applications in favor of microservices where possible. What we need to understand is that the goal of splitting out these services is to favor deployment speed over API invocation speed.

    The main reason to split off microservices out of an existing monolith should be to isolate the development of the service within a team, completely separate from the application development team. The service engineering team can now operate at their own intervals, deploying changes weekly, daily, or even hourly if a noteworthy Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) is applicable.

    The penalty for unknown network invocations is the trade-off to your monolith’s highly regimented deployment requirements that cause it to move at two- to three-month deployment intervals. Now, with microservice teams, you can react quicker to the business, competition, and security demands with faster delivery intervals. Equally critical for network invocations is to look closely at how course-grained your network calls become in this new distributed architecture.

  • Stackrox Launches Kubernetes Security Platform Version 2.0

    StackRox, the security for holders and Kubernetes company, declared the general accessibility of form 2.5 of the StackRox Kubernetes Security Platform. The new form incorporates upgraded arrangement and runtime controls that empower organizations to flawlessly authorize security controls to improve use cases, including threat detection, network segmentation, configuration management, and vulnerability management.

  • Pete Zaitcev: Docker Block Storage... say what again?

    Okay. Since they talk about consistency and replication together, this thing probably provides actual service, in addition to the necessary orchestration. Kind of the ill-fated Sheepdog. They may under-estimate the amount of work necesary, sure. Look no further than Ceph RBD. Remember how much work it took for a genius like Sage? But a certain arrogance is essential in a start-up, and Rancher only employs 150 people.

    Also, nobody is dumb enough to write orchestration in Go, right? So this probably is not just a layer on top of Ceph or whatever.

    Well, it's still possible that it's merely an in-house equivalent of OpenStack Cinder, and they want it in Go because they are a Go house and if you have a hammer everything looks like a nail.

    Either way, here's the main question: what does block storage have to do with Docker?

  • Changing the face of computing: UNIX turns 50

    In the late 1960s, a small team of programmers was aspiring to write a multi-tasking, multi-user operating system. Then in August 1969 Ken Thompson, a programmer at AT&T Bell Laboratories, started development of the first-ever version of the UNIX operating system (OS).

    Over the next few years, he and his colleagues Dennis Ritchie, Brian Kernighan, and others developed both this and the C-programming language. As the UNIX OS celebrates its 50th birthday, let’s take a moment to reflect on its impact on the world we live in today.

  • The Legendary OS once kicked by many big companies turns 50. The Story.

    Maybe its pervasiveness has long obscured its roots. But Unix, the OS which proves to be legendary and, in one derivative or another, powers nearly all smartphones sold worldwide, came 50 years ago from the failure of an ambitious project involving titans like GE, Bell Labs, and MIT.

    [...]

    Still, it was something to work on, and as long as Bell Labs was working on Multics, they would also have a $7 million mainframe computer to play around with in their spare time. Dennis Ritchie, one of the programmers working on Multics, later said they all felt some stake in the victory of the project, even though they knew the odds of that success were exceedingly remote.

    Cancellation of Multics meant the end of the only project that the programmers in the Computer science department had to work on—and it also meant the loss of the only computer in the Computer science department. After the GE 645 mainframe was taken apart and hauled off, the computer science department’s resources were reduced to little more than office supplies and a few terminals.

More in Tux Machines

Tiny, solderable i.MX8M Mini module debuts new OSM form factor

F&S unveiled a solderable, 30 x 30mm “OSM-MX8MM” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini based on an SDT.05 Open Standard Module form factor, a proposed SGET standard co-developed with Kontron and Iesy. Stuttgart, Germany F&S Elektronik Systeme showed off a prototype of a 30 x 30mm, i.MX8M Mini based OSM-MX8MM module — the first product to adopt a proposed Open Standard Module (OSM) form factor for solderable compute modules. The open source OSM standard was developed by an SDT.05 working group within the Standardization Group for Embedded Technologies (SGET), the group behind the SMARC form factor. OSM is notable for its small footprint and capacity to be soldered directly onto a baseboard. Read more

Oracle Announces New Solaris and SAP/SUSE Explains GNU/Linux is Better

  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU18

    Today we are releasing SRU 18 for Oracle Solaris 11.4. It is available via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Ships Solaris 11.4 SRU18 - Finally Mitigates The SWAPGS Vulnerability

    Oracle today has released Solaris 11.4 SRU18 as the newest version of the long-running Solaris 11.4 series. There still doesn't appear to be anything active past Solaris 11.4 but Oracle does continue providing routine maintenance updates for Oracle Solaris customers. Solaris 11.4 has been out for a year and a half and is now to its eighteenth stable release update.

  • Linux And High Availability Go Hand In Hand

    If SAP infrastructures or their components malfunction or stop working altogether, SAP-supported processes are also at risk. A comprehensive Linux package includes a High Availability functionality. SAP core infrastructure components like servers (including VMs, storage, databases, and operating systems like Linux) or networks have a high level of technological maturity and take care of SAP-related tasks. It sometimes does happen that the IT department has to step in if business-critical applications like S/4 malfunction or stop working altogether because of faulty SAP infrastructure components.

Fedora and CentOS Leftovers

  • GNU Linux Distributions – about Fedora -> CentOS -> RedHat

    The focus of the Governing Board is to assist and guide in the progress and development of the various SIGs, as well as to lead and promote CentOS. The CentOS Governing Board is the governing body responsible for the overall oversight of the CentOS Project and SIGs, the creation of new SIGs, and the election (and re-election) of new board members. The Board also has the responsibility to ensure the goals, brands, and marks of the CentOS Project and community are protected. The Board serves as the final authority within the CentOS Project.

  • Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #9

    I woke up to the cold morning in my tower. The sun shone brightly on the sky, but the stone of the tower was cold as it takes some time to make it warm. Everything was already prepared for today’s journey. I sat at my table and started going through some reports from workers. I still had some time til the traveler arrived. So I started reading the reports …

  • Fedora 31 : The Fyne UI toolkit for Go programming language.
  • ABRT team: New releases

    Just prior to branching of Fedora 32, we released new versions of abrt, gnome‑abrt, abrt‑java‑connector, libreport, satyr and retrace‑server.

Mesa 20.0 Released

  • mesa 20.0.0
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 20.0.0 as available for download immediately. I'm very
    pleased that we could get all of the issues blocking the release nailed down
    quickly and make a release on time for once!
    
    This is a .0 release, and you may want to continue to to track 19.3.x until
    20.0.1 comes out in two weeks. 19.3.5 is planned to be the final 19.3 release
    and is planned for next Wednesday.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Alyssa Rosenzweig (3):
          pan/midgard: Fix missing prefixes
          pan/midgard: Don't crash with constants on unknown ops
          pan/midgard: Use fprintf instead of printf for constants
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nir: Unify inputs_read/outputs_written before serializing NIR
    
    Dylan Baker (6):
          .pick_status.json: Update to 2a98cf3b2ecea43cea148df7f77d2abadfd1c9db
          .pick_status.json: Update to 946eacbafb47c8b94d47e7c9d2a8b02fff5a22fa
          .pick_status.json: Update to bee5c9b0dc13dbae0ccf124124eaccebf7f2a435
          Docs: Add 20.0.0 release notes
          docs: Empty new_features.txt
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0 release
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          Revert "nir: Add a couple trivial abs optimizations"
    
    Francisco Jerez (6):
          intel/fs/cse: Make HALT instruction act as CSE barrier.
          intel/fs/gen7: Fix fs_inst::flags_written() for SHADER_OPCODE_FIND_LIVE_CHANNEL.
          intel/fs: Add virtual instruction to load mask of live channels into flag register.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround unwanted SEND execution due to broken NoMask control flow.
          intel/fs/gen12: Fixup/simplify SWSB annotations of SIMD32 scratch writes.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround data coherency issues due to broken NoMask control flow.
    
    Krzysztof Raszkowski (1):
          gallium/swr: simplify environmental variabled expansion code
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't wait for shader compilation to finish when destroying a context
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Implement getImage/putImage on pbuffer swrast.
    
    Peng Huang (1):
          radeonsi: make si_fence_server_signal flush pipe without work
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          radeonsi/ngg: add VGT_FLUSH when enabling fast launch
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          glsl: fix a memory leak with resource_set
          iris: fix aux buf map failure in 32bits app on Android
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          Revert "st/va: Convert interlaced NV12 to progressive"
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          glsl: fix gl_nir_set_uniform_initializers() for image arrays
    
    luc (1):
          zink: confused compilation macro usage for zink in target helpers.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Released With Big Improvements For Intel, AMD Radeon Vulkan/OpenGL

    The Mesa 20.0 release switches to the new Intel OpenGL driver default, Vulkan 1.2 support for both AMD Radeon and Intel drivers, the RadeonSI OpenGL driver now has GL 4.6 compliance as part of switching to NIR, the Valve-backed ACO code-path for RADV is in much better shape, and many other improvements. See our Mesa 20.0 feature overview to learn about this big update.

  • Mesa 20.0 Is Imminent With New Intel OpenGL Default, Intel + RADV Vulkan 1.2, OpenGL 4.6 For RadeonSI

    With the release of Mesa 20.0 being imminent, here is a look at all of the new features for this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D stack for open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers. Highlights of the soon-to-be-out Mesa 20.0 are outlined below. Mesa 20.0 will be out as soon as today / this week unless delays happen over lingering bugs. - This is the first Mesa release where for those with Broadwell (Gen8) Intel graphics or newer the Intel Gallium3D driver is the new default for OpenGL support. This Intel Gallium3D driver is faster and in better shape than the i965 classic driver. That older OpenGL driver will stick around for supporting Haswell graphics and prior generations.

  • RADV Driver Adds VK_EXT_line_rasterization In Preparing For Eventual Vulkan CAD Apps

    Added to the Vulkan API last summer was VK_EXT_line_rasterization for line rasterization like employed by CAD applications. The open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver is now supporting this extension.