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Huawei: Android Woes, RISC-V and Jolla's Sailfish OS

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  • Huawei to push ahead with flagship phone launch — with or without Google services

    Huawei will launch a new flagship phone next month which may not come with Google apps, a source with direct knowledge of the matter told CNBC, as the Chinese firm faces being blocked from accessing the search giant's software.

    The Mate 30 will be showcased at a September 19 launch event in Munich, Germany, the source said. It will be powered by Huawei's latest processor called the Kirin 990 which is yet to be unveiled. The Mate 30 will be able to connect to next-generation mobile networks known as 5G which promise super-fast data speeds.

    Huawei is pushing ahead with the launch despite being on a U.S. blacklist known as the Entity List. It restricts American firms from doing business with the Chinese company. But the tech giant has been given another 90-day reprieve under which U.S. firms can apply for special licenses to sell to Huawei.

    Google is subject to these restrictions. Huawei relies on Google's Android operating system to power its smartphones. In China, Huawei uses a modified version of Android which is stripped of Google services like Gmail or Maps because those are blocked in the country. Instead, it pre-loads its own apps. But in international markets, those Google services are pre-loaded on Huawei phones.

  • Huawei Mate 30 can’t launch with official Google apps, says Google

    Huawei may face a major roadblock for its next flagship phone, the Mate 30 — it won’t be able to launch with Google apps and services due to the White House banning US companies (like Google) from doing business with the Chinese telecommunications firm, according to a report from Reuters.

    That means that the Mate 30 — and presumably, other upcoming devices like the now-delayed foldable Mate X — could be severely limited at launch. They’ll still run Android, which is at its core open-source software that’s freely available. But Google has confirmed to The Verge that the Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro (rumored to launch on September 18th) won’t be able to ship with Google’s apps and services on board, which could put them at a severe disadvantage given how important Google’s apps are.

  • Huawei Seeks Independence From the US With RISC-V and Ascend Chips

    Huawei has launched its 7nm Ascend 910 artificial intelligence chip for data centers together with a new comprehensive AI framework MindSpore. The announcement comes at a time when Huawei is facing pressure from the US government, which Huawei is responding to by considering using the open-source RISC-V.

  • Huawei using Sailfish OS fork on tablets for Russian census project

    Embattled Chinese electronics manufacturer Huawei is planning to ship a Russian variant of Jolla's Sailfish OS on 360,000 tablets intended for use in conducting the Russian population census, according to a Reuters report published Monday.

    This project comes as Huawei is looking for alternatives to Android, following their placement on the "Entity List" by the US government, effectively blacklisting the company from acquiring US-origin technology for use in their own products. This blacklisting does not affect Huawei's ability to use the public, open-source AOSP repository. It does prevent use of Google Play services, through which vital APIs for Google Maps integration in apps is provided—as well as the Play Store, the default Android app store.

Huawei launches open source site for Ark Compiler

  • Huawei launches open source site for Ark Compiler to promote HarmonyOS, related ecosystem

    Huawei launched a website for the long-anticipated open source project Ark Compiler over the weekend, a significant step in helping global developers adopt Android coding into applications that are compatible with the Chinese company's HarmonyOS.

    The site will also help push forward the building of an ecosystem for HarmonyOS amid the US attack on the Chinese technology powerhouse.

    The website of Ark Compiler was put online on Saturday, allowing users to access and download the source code. A compiler is a program that translates programming language into machine language, which could bridge the gap between human instructions and a machine's ability to understand them. Such programs are critical to the efficiency of execution.

    Huawei said its Ark Compiler could work without the need for an interpreter to enable direct translation.

    In releasing the compiler, Huawei said it aims to share technological development with developers and grow with them together to promote industrial innovation in an open way and build up an open ecosystem.

Huawei Ark compiler open-source code to arrive on August 31

  • Huawei Ark compiler open-source code to arrive on August 31

    Today, Huawei EMUI officially said that the Ark compiler open-source code is ready. The company wrote, “wait for August 31 show you the code!”. In April this year, Huawei’s consumer business CEO, Yu Chengdong, officially released Huawei Ark compiler. According to the company, the compiler can improve the compilation efficiency of Android applications. As of now, this feature is already available in many Huawei and Honor smartphones.

Huawei Alternatives to Google/Android

  • Huawei Shock: Mate 30 Pro To Miss Gmail, Google Maps, Report Claims
  • Huawei unveils new chip for flagship phone it hopes will compete with Apple

    Huawei unveiled a new 5G processor for its mobile devices Friday, taking aim at competitors like Qualcomm and showing it will continue to bolster its chip technology amid political headwinds.

    The Chinese tech giant showed off the new Kirin 990 5G chip at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin. Huawei said the processor will power its upcoming flagship smartphone called the Mate 30, which will be released later this month in a bid to rival Apple's expected new iPhones.

    Huawei's announcement highlights the company's ambitions to take control of its supply chain amid political pressure from the U.S. Earlier this year, Huawei was put on a U.S. entity list that limits its ability to buy and license technology from American companies. The Chinese firm currently relies on American businesses for components in its devices like laptops and smartphones.

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