Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • A managed open-source approach can improve the health of your open-source supply chain

    Led by open-source industry veterans, many whom were on the original Red Hat Enterprise Linux team—including Fischer—Tidelift has partnered with a network of developers who typically are the original creators and maintainers of open-source components. Maintainers collaborating with Tidelift, or “lifters,” are compensated to deliver vetted updates as they’re released and then Tidelift delivers them to its subscribers. As part of the service, Tidelift helps organizations select and identify all the components within an environment. The service also draws on knowledge from Tidelift’s database of information on 3.3 million open-source packages.

    “We’re providing as a service, a stream of known, good, open-source packages, where it’s somebody’s job to keep those patches, keep the licenses in compliance and ensure the quality is there around those open-source components,” he says. “Our customers don’t need to do their own due-diligence and research. Certain things break, it’s not their problem to fix it, it’s our problem to fix it, they just consume it, like they would consume any sort of raw open source without all of those issues that would come with raw open source.”

  • Do You Rely on Open-Source Software? Offer Your Support.

    A recent scheme by a programmer to attempt to fund his open-source project through advertising drew heavy backlash among fellow programmers, but his bigger point is one associations can appreciate.

    The “free as in freedom” mindset of open-source software, which is increasingly finding its way into mainstream work environments, is starting to show some cracks.

    The latest crack appeared within the terminal screen—an experiment by a developer who was trying to find some way, any way, to financially support his widely used work.

    Here’s what happened: The open-source programmer Feross Aboukhadijeh, who develops a popular JavaScript programming tool called Standard, decided to create a new JavaScript package called Funding. Funding did something unique for an open-source package: Basically, a developer attached it to another package (which Aboukhadijeh did to Standard), and it showed a “banner” ad in the terminal. It was not a highly graphical ad—just a link and a line of text in a gray box—but it was enough to raise a contentious discussion in the open-source universe.

    Funding went down almost immediately, a victim of a massive backlash. (Someone even developed an ad blocker!) Explaining why he did it, Aboukhadijeh said he was concerned that the funding model for open-source software was “not working” and experimentation was needed.

  • Open source big data processing at massive scale and warp speed

    HPCC Systems (High Performance Computing Cluster), a dba of LexisNexis Risk Solutions, is an open-source big-data computing platform. Flavio Villanustre, vice president technology and CISO at LexisNexis Risk Solutions, explained HPCC Systems’s evolution came as a necessity.

    “In 2000 we were getting into data analytics, using the platforms, databases, and data integration tools that were available at the time. None of these tools would scale to handle the quantity of data and complexity of processes that we were doing.” He added, “That drove us to create our own platform, now known as HPCC Systems, a completely free, end-to-end big data platform.”

    According to Villanustre, Accurint is the first product that utilized the platform. Accurint began as a data lookup service that took large amounts of data from numerous data sets and provided basic search capabilities to other companies and organizations. Today, Accurint has evolved and developed capabilities to help detect fraud and verify identities.

  • Binance launches ‘Binance X’, aims at building open-source crypto software

    Binance X offers a fellowship program that is aimed at research and development of open-source blockchain software. The exchange has not yet disclosed any information on how much funds it will provide for the 40 project leads that have already signed on as Binance X fellows. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

  • FFmpeg Adds ZeroMQ Support To Let Multiple Clients Connect To A Single Instance

    An interesting new addition to FFmpeg's avformat library is ZeroMQ protocol support for enhancing its streaming abilities.

    The newly-added ZeroMQ support to FFMpeg improves the streaming options by allowing multiple clients to connect to a single FFmpeg instance without a separate server or multi-cast destination address setup as previously required.

More in Tux Machines

deepin Linux 20 looks incredible

I recently sold my MacBook Pro for a few reasons, but probably most importantly, macOS just wasn't wowing me anymore. While Apple's desktop operating system is good for basic users, it is far too limited for the more hardcore. Ultimately, I found my productivity was negatively impacted by macOS -- my workflow with Windows 10 and various Linux distributions was simply better. Of course, with all of that said, macOS is much prettier than Windows 10 -- even Microsoft would confess to that. But is it more attractive than desktop Linux distributions? Well, that depends on the desktop environment. While there are plenty of beautiful DEs and launchers for Linux, only one really surpasses macOS in the looks department -- deepin. Read more

New TenFourFox and Mozilla Firefox Team News

  • TenFourFox FPR16 SPR1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release "16.1" (SPR 1) is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). As noted, this is a pure security update and there are no user-facing changes; the big under-the-hood change of those is that we are now pulling entirely from 68ESR, including locale data, certificate roots and so forth. There is also a small update to the ATSUI font blacklist. Assuming no issues, it will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

  • Chris H-C: Four-Year Moziversary

    We gained two new team members, Travis and Beatriz. And with Georg taking a short break, we’ve all had more to do that usual. Glean‘s really been working out well, though I’ve only had the pleasure of working on it a little bit. Instead I’ve been adding fun new features to Firefox Desktop like Origin Telemetry. I also gave a talk at a conference about Data and Responsibility. Last December’s All Hands returned us to Orlando, and June brought me to Whistler for the first time. We held a Virtual Work Week (or “vorkweek”) a couple of weeks ago when we couldn’t find a time and the budget to meet in person, and spent it planning out how we’ll bring Glean to Firefox Desktop with Project FOG. First with a Prototype (FOGotype) by end of year. And then 2020 will be the year of Glean on the Desktop.

Linux 5.4 Lands A Number Of Memory Management Fixes

While mid-way through the Linux 5.4 development cycle with RC4 due out on Sunday, a number of memory management fixes just hit the mainline kernel. Andrew Morton's pull request was merged on Friday night and he noted, "Rather a lot of fixes, almost all affecting mm/" Indeed there were memory management fixes in this pull ahead of 5.4-rc4. Changes include a zRAM race condition fix, avoiding access to uninitialized memory maps, allow dropping transparent huge-pages (THP) from the page cache, and other fixes in this area including the possibility of a kernel crash. Read more Also: Intel's Cloud Hypervisor 0.3 Adds Block Device Offloading, Paravirtualized IOMMU

Programming: eMMC Flash, Compilers and Python

  • Some Tesla EV’s Control Screens Went Dark as Excessive Logging killed the eMMC Flash

    Despite wear-leveling techniques, eMMC flash memories tend to wear out over time as they have limited write cycles.

  • AMD Zen 2 Improvements For LLVM Have Been Held Up For Months By Code Review

    Back in February for LLVM Clang 9.0 was the initial AMD Zen 2 "znver2" enablement, but like the GCC support at the time it was the very basics. With time GCC picked up Zen 2 scheduler improvements and other work while sadly in the case of LLVM the improvements are still pending. Back in August, AMD's Ganesh Gopalasubramanian sent out the znver2 scheduler model for LLVM for Zen 2 CPUs but a focus on the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors. "There are few improvements with respect to execution units, latencies and throughput when compared with znver1. The tests that were present for znver1 for llvm-mca tool were replicated. The latencies, execution units, timeline and throughput information are updated for znver2."

  • Python Add Lists

    This tutorial covers the following topic – Python Add lists. It describes various ways to join/concatenate/add lists in Python. For example – simply appending elements of one list to the tail of the other in a for loop, or using +/* operators, list comprehension, extend(), and itertools.chain() methods. Most of these techniques use built-in constructs in Python. However, the one, itertools.chain() is a method defined in the itertools module. You must also see which of these ways is more suitable in your scenario. After going through this post, you can evaluate their performance in case of large lists.

  • StackOverflow Report: (cxcix) stackoverflow python report