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OSS Leftovers

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  • Two "Life-Changing" Firefox Add-ons

    I'm a diehard Firefox fan. Having used it since it came out, it just works the way I want and need it to work. And, just as for any Firefox user, I have a collection of must-have add-ons that I use with it. Yes, the switch to Firefox Quantum was a little painful for me, since I had to give up a few of my absolute favorite must-have add-ons. The developers of those add-ons had chosen to not conform to the new add-on architecture that Firefox Quantum brought with it. But, I found replacements for most of them, and life went on.

  • Mozilla Rust Considered for Linux Drivers

    When Graydon Hoare of Mozilla (and later others) designed Rust, they wanted a fast, concurrent, memory-safe language without garbage collection because web browsers need to be fast and resistant to malware. Their decision was to create Rust, which provides these features by forcing restrictions on the developer. Now that the language has reached a decent level of maturity, third parties are looking into it.

  • Mind Your Step: A New Rant Series

    Sadly, another blow to the existence of 32-bit computing came with the Document Foundation making the decision to no longer produce a 32-bit version of LibreOffice.

    As of Version 6.3 (the current version as of this writing), LibreOffice will be available as a 64-bit only product. The 32-bit version of LibreOffice 6.3 is available only for Windows. There is no 32-bit Linux or Mac OS-X binary available for download.

  • Interactive Investigations | Coder Radio 373

    We debate the best way to package scripting language apps then explore interactive development and the importance of a good shell.

    Plus npm bans terminal ads, what comes after Rust, and why Mike hates macros.

  • 9 Django Concepts Part 3 - Read Time: 3 Mins

    Welcome to the final part of the 9 Django Concepts for aspiring Django developers.

    For this, I will be covering parts like deployment, testing and supporting front-end framework.

    Which is a project that any Django developer who is building it for a Javascript based front-end framework.

    If you had miss part 1 or part 2, I would suggest you go to those before reading this part 3 to not miss out on it.

  • GnuPG for e-mail encryption and signing

    GnuPG, originally released 20 years ago, offers encryption for everyone. However, like every piece of software, it neither is flawless nor perfect. Recent attacks like ROCA, SigSpoof, Efail, and signature flooding revived the discussions about its security.

  • Building interactive SSH applications

    On the server, there are three steps which you can meddle with using OpenSSH: authentication, the shell session, and the command. The shell is pretty easily manipulated. For example, if you set the user’s login shell to /usr/bin/nethack, then nethack will run when they log in. Editing this is pretty straightforward, just pop open /etc/passwd as root and set their shell to your desired binary. If the user SSHes into your server with a TTY allocated (which is done by default), then you’ll be able to run a curses application or something interactive.

    However, a downside to this is that, if you choose a “shell” which does not behave like a shell, it will break when the user passes additional command line arguments, such as ssh user@host ls -a. To address this, instead of overriding the shell, we can override the command which is run. The best place to do this is in the user’s authorized_keys file. Before each line, you can add options which apply to users who log in with that key. One of these options is the “command” option. If you add this to /home/user/.ssh/authorized_keys instead: [...]

More in Tux Machines

Top 20 Best Openbox Themes for Linux System in 2019

Have you ever heard about the stacking window manager, Openbox? It is broadly used in Unix-like systems. Most probably, it’s among the most customizable parts out there. You can easily modify and beautify this with a little bit of effort. The question may arise- with what and how can you do this? Well! We are going to disclose it now. It’s by Openbox themes, which lets you have a minimalist and fantastic visual interface for your desktop manager. Read more

Fedora IoT Review

With the rise in IoT use, we are witnessing a demand for ready-made operating systems to support smart device development. Currently, the race is between proprietary versions such as IoT Plug and Play by Microsoft and open source operating systems. One such emerging open source player is Fedora which has a workstation that supports virtualization and containers. Fedora is also slated to release an Internet of Things edition called “Fedora IoT” in future. Here is a review of the open source product’s support capabilities for IoT and relevant installation details. Read more

5 Practical Examples of the Read Command in Linux

With read command, you can make your bash script interactive by accepting user inputs. Learn to use the read command in Linux with these practical examples. Read more

Programming: C++, C and Python

  • Extend C++ capabilities with LLVM STLExtras.h

    The LLVM compiler project provides a header file called STLExtras.h that extends the capabilities of C++ without any dependency on the rest of LLVM. In this article, we take a quick look at its basic functionality.

  • Rewriting Old Solaris C Code In Python Yielded A 17x Performance Improvement

    While we normally hear of rewriting code from Python and other scripting languages into C/C++ when its a matter of performance, in the case of Oracle Solaris it was taking old C code and modernizing it in Python 3 to yield a ~17x performance improvement. Shared today on Oracle's official Solaris blog was an interesting anecdote about their listusers command being rewritten in Python 3 from C. Oracle's Darren Moffat noted the C code was largely untouched since around 1988 and given its design at a time when systems were less dense than today with hundreds or even thousands of users per system.

  • Python Projects for Beginners: The Best Way to Learn

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation. How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do! When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress.

  • PyCon 2019: The People of PyCon

    I can’t tell you how amazing it was to meet the individuals I read, listen to, or who make the tools I use. I was so happy to meet the authors that helped me to grow over the last few years, especially Dan Bader, Peter Baumgartner, Matt Harrison, Reuven Lerner, Harry Percival , and Lacey Williams Henschel. I love podcasts, so it was wonderful to meet Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken in person. And I was happy to meet Paul Ganssle, Russell Keith-Magee, Barry Warsaw, and other maintainers and contributors. It was a delight to meet Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira from PyBites.

  • Find the first non-consecutive number with Python

    Your task is to find the first element of an array that is not consecutive. E.g. If we have an array [1,2,3,4,6,7,8] then 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 are all consecutive but 6 is not, so that’s the first non-consecutive number. If the whole array is consecutive then return None.

  • Perceiving Python programming paradigms

    Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.