Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Apple + Intel = M$ Conspiracy Theory

Filed under
Humor

Shouting "I told you so!" and "The end is near!", staff members of the Humorix Vast Conspiracy Theory Research Division were shocked and appalled by the news that Apple is going to start shacking up with Intel.

The "Inpple" development fits perfectly with our Microsoft Conspiracy Theory #36,712,380, the most sinister conspiracy theory ever devised by Humorix that hasn't been discredited within five minutes. Ever since Microsoft invested $250 million in Apple in 1997, the company that wants you to "Think Different" has been thinking more and more along the same old lines as Microsoft.

"It's all fitting into place," said Mennon Black, head conspiriologist. "With Apple joining Intel, and Sun laying down arms against Microsoft, the vastly inferior Wintel world has just achieved total world domination. I knew this was going to happen."

It should come as no surprise that the unholy alliance of Apple's Reality Distortion Field and Intel's Stupid Four-Bar Jingle Inside will provide a win-win situation for Microsoft. For those brave souls that decide to try Mac OS X-86 Edition, they can always wipe the hard drive and install Windows if they don't like Apple's operating system.

Meanwhile, Microsoft can cut costs by getting rid of its "problem customers" that are always pestering tech support with their petty complaints about corrupted registries or spyware programs that distribute child porn. Now these customers will be shunted to Intel-based Macs, but they will still buy plenty of other Microsoft products that will be readily available for X-86.

Either way, Microsoft wins.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more