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today's leftovers

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  • How to Set and List Environment Variables in Linux
  • Hardware hacking basics, Slackel + OSCAR | Choose Linux 17

    Getting into hardware hacking with Arduino, and analysing sleep data from CPAP machines.

    Plus a glimpse into the past in Distrohoppers.

  • Debian 11 Testing with XFCE 4.14 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Debian Testing Bullseye with XFCE 4.14.

  • Introducing Glean — Telemetry for humans

    In the last few years, Firefox development has become increasingly data-driven. Mozilla’s larger data engineering team builds & maintains most of the technical infrastructure that makes this possible; from the Firefox telemetry code to the Firefox data platform and hosting analysis tools. While data about our products is crucial, Mozilla has a rare approach to data collection, following our privacy principles. This includes requiring data review for every new piece of data collection to ensure we are upholding our principles — even when it makes our jobs harder.

    One great success story for us is having the Firefox telemetry data described in machine-readable and clearly structured form. This encourages best practices like mandatory documentation, steering towards lean data practices and enables automatic data processing — from generating tables to powering tools like our measurement dashboard or the Firefox probe dictionary.

    However, we also learned lessons about what didn’t work so well. While the data types we used were flexible, they were hard to interpret. For example, we use plain numbers to store counts, generic histograms to store multiple timespan measures and allow for custom JSON submissions for uncovered use-cases. The flexibility of these data types means it takes work to understand how to use them for different use-cases & leaves room for accidental error on the instrumentation side. Furthermore, it requires manual effort in interpreting & analysing these data points. We noticed that we could benefit from introducing higher-level data types that are closer to what we want to measure — like data types for “counters” and “timing distributions”.

  • Debugging TypeScript in Firefox DevTools

    Firefox Debugger has evolved into a fast and reliable tool chain over the past several months and it’s now supporting many cool features. Though primarily used to debug JavaScript, did you know that you can also use Firefox to debug your TypeScript applications?

    Before we jump into real world examples, note that today’s browsers can’t run TypeScript code directly. It’s important to understand that TypeScript needs to be compiled into Javascript before it’s included in an HTML page.

    Also, debugging TypeScript is done through a source-map, and so we need to instruct the compiler to produce a source-map for us as well.

  • Sponsor Article: why open frameworks matter

    The use of computers to control buildings was an inevitable consequence of the falling cost of the technology and the huge increase in the complexity of the equipment required to achieve comfort in large modern buildings. As with computers, the nascent BMS market was initially supplied by manufacturers who offered highly-proprietary systems which only they could install and maintain. As the technology matured, so the software to program the required control logic was made easier. As a result, a wider range of people could provide the engineering. Meanwhile, pressure from end users, who didn’t want to be tied to only one manufacturer for the life of the building or campus, led to the development of open protocol standards that could enable one manufacturers’ system to talk to another.

    However, since the way buildings are contracted tends to require a functionally-biased packaging of sub-contracts, each piece of controls equipment in a building developed separately, and each sub-sector developed its own standards. The result today is a plethora of ‘standard’ protocols which are used by the various sub-systems in a building; BACnet for HVAC, DALI and KNX for lighting, Modbus for electrical metering and power management, M-Bus for heat metering etc. Some protocols such as LONworks did manage for a while to gain traction in multiple segments, but its adoption has declined in recent years. So, although people still dream of there being ‘one standard to rule them all’, the reality is much messier, and the challenge of how to get systems talking to one another has not gone away.

  • Free Software Supporter - Issue 137, September 2019

    Defective by Design is calling on you to stand up against digital restrictions management and join us in celebration of the International Day Against DRM (IDAD) on October 12th, 2019. Keep an eye on defectivebydesign.org for further announcements.

  • Some Intel Firmware Binaries Will Reportedly Be More Liberally Licensed

    One interesting nugget of news from this week's Open-Source Firmware Conference is that some Intel firmware binaries pertaining to their Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) will be more liberally licensed under their simpler microcode/firmware license.

    Open-source firmware consulting firm 3mdeb shared that Intel will reportedly publish TXT-related binaries like BIOS and SINIT ACMs under a similar license to the Intel FSP and microcode.

More in Tux Machines

Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

At just 37mm tall, the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 is one of the shortest yet quite capable CPU heatsink fans we have seen yet for AMD Ryzen processors. When looking for a heatsink with a small stature for an AMD APU mini PC build for HTPC / file storage use-cases (more on that build in the next day or two), the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 fit the criteria and so I went with that given the success with the many Noctua heatsinks we have used over the years. For those potentially interested in the NH-L9a-AM4 for an AMD APU like the new Ryzen 5 3400G or for lower-end Ryzen CPUs, I ran some benchmarks with this cooler. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • Codementor: Can We Do Machine Learning without python, absolutely No... Read this...

    Python has become, go programming language Around the World. From many Software companies to Consumer-based Companies.

  • Code it, ship it, own it with full-service ownership

    Software teams seeking to provide better products and services must focus on faster release cycles. But running reliable systems at ever-increasing speeds presents a big challenge. Software teams can have both quality and speed by adjusting their policies around ongoing service ownership. While on-call plays a large part in this model, advancement in knowledge, more resilient code, increased collaboration, and better practices mean engineers don't have to wake up to a nightmare. This four-part series will delve into the concepts of full-service ownership, psychological safety in transformation, the ethics of accountability, and the impact of ownership on the customer experience.

  • ML with Python: Part-1

    Now, We are comfortable with Python and ready to get started with Machine Learning (ML) projects. But, Where to go next? Can we directly dive into coding ML projects? Please follow along to know the answer.....

  • Simple rules of good programming

    Hi guys, I work as a programmer for more than 15 years and was using many different languages, paradigms, frameworks and other shit. And I want to share with you my rules of writing good code. [...] Code review can be as good as it can be bad. You can organize code review only if you have a developer who understand 95% of the code and who can monitor all updates without wasting to much time. In another situation, it will be just time consuming and everyone will hate this. On this part got too many questions so describe this more deeply. Many people think that code review it’s a good way of teaching new guys, or teammates who work on a different part of code. But the main target of code review it’s maintaining code quality, and not teaching. Let’s imagine that your team making code for controlling a cooling system for nuclear reactor, or space rocket engine. And you made huge mistake in very hard logic, and then you are giving this for code review to the new guy. How do you think what would be the risk of an accident? — On my practice more than 70%. A good team is where each person has own role and responsibility for the exact piece of work. If someone wants to understand another piece of code then he goes to a person responsible for it and asks her. Impossible to know everything and better excellent understand a small piece of code than all but on 30%.

  • Hone advanced Bash skills by building Minesweeper

    I am no expert on teaching programming, but when I want to get better at something, I try to find a way to have fun with it. For example, when I wanted to get better at shell scripting, I decided to practice by programming a version of the Minesweeper game in Bash. If you are an experienced Bash programmer and want to hone your skills while having fun, follow along to write your own version of Minesweeper in the terminal. The complete source code is found in this GitHub repository.

  • Java 13 Delivers Features That Improve Productivity, Efficiency

    At its CodeOne conference, Oracle explains how the rapid release cycle for Java has yielded innovation, as Java SE 13 is officially launched.

  • A Novel About Java & Open Source – Meet The Author Of “Emmy In The Key Of Code”

    “Emmy in the Key of Code” is novel written by Aimee Lucido, a software engineer who works at Uber. It’s about Java and music. Oracle invited Lucido to speak at the Oracle OpenWorld/Code One event. We sat down with her to talk about her book and what inspired her to write it.

  • Intellectual property Law and Coding

    In the world of software, good code is a necessity, and great code can make the difference between a startup succeeding and failing. But how do you protect coding innovations that may be novel or unique? Intellectual property law, or IP law, is the main legalistic framework that can answer many of those questions and more. Any business, and perhaps more crucially, any individual coder, should be aware of their options when it comes to maintaining the rights to their work. Here, we delve into some of the most important things to know about IP law and coding.

LLVM 9.0.0 released

It's my great pleasure to announce that LLVM 9 is now available. Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#9.0.0 This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past six months (up to trunk r366426 plus commits on the branch). Some highlights include: - Support for asm goto, enabling for example the mainline Linux kernel for x86_64 to build with Clang - The RISCV-V target is no longer experimental, but built by default - Experimental support for C++ for OpenCL as well as many bug fixes, optimizations, and diagnostics improvements. Read more

today's howtos