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ATI Linux Display Driver v8.14.13

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Hardware
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Earlier in the day ATI released their new Catalyst 5.6 drivers. These new Windows drivers offer such new features as mobile support, an improved Catalyst Control Center (CCC), re-vamped Catalyst AI for gamers, and several other intuitive features. However, we wouldn't be bringing you this article if there wasn't anything to share about the Linux side of things. Today we have a look at the entirely new ATI Linux driver installer and ATI Control Panel.

The first thing we noticed about the new ATI driver installer download was its immense size, weighing in at 35.1MB, which is four times greater in size than previous ATI Linux drivers. However, the 35.1MB package contains the new graphical installer and support for multiple versions of XFree86 and X.Org. Alternatively, if you don't want the benefits of the new improved setup, the traditional driver RPMs can still be downloaded. The system we used to report our initial findings regarding these drivers contained a Sapphire X300SE 128MB PCI Express, Tyan Tomcat i915 motherboard, and Intel Pentium 4 530 (3.0GHz) processor. The distribution we used was FedoraCore3 with the 2.6.11-1.27 kernel and Xorg 6.8.2.

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