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Mozilla: DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) and Communications

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Moz/FF
  • What’s next in making Encrypted DNS-over-HTTPS the Default

    In 2017, Mozilla began working on the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol, and since June 2018 we’ve been running experiments in Firefox to ensure the performance and user experience are great. We’ve also been surprised and excited by the more than 70,000 users who have already chosen on their own to explicitly enable DoH in Firefox Release edition. We are close to releasing DoH in the USA, and we have a few updates to share.

    After many experiments, we’ve demonstrated that we have a reliable service whose performance is good, that we can detect and mitigate key deployment problems, and that most of our users will benefit from the greater protections of encrypted DNS traffic. We feel confident that enabling DoH by default is the right next step. When DoH is enabled, users will be notified and given the opportunity to opt out.

    This post includes results of our latest experiment, configuration recommendations for systems administrators and parental controls providers, and our plans for enabling DoH for some users in the USA.

  • Mike Hoye: Forward Motion

    This has been a while coming; thank you for your patience. I’m very happy to be able to share the final four candidates for Mozilla’s new community-facing synchronous messaging system.

    [...]

    We’ve been spoiled for choice here – there were a bunch of good-looking options that didn’t make it to the final four – but these are the choices that generally seem to meet our current institutional needs and organizational goals.

    We haven’t stood up a test instance for Slack, on the theory that Mozilla already has a surprising number of volunteer-focused Slack instances running already – Common Voice, Devtools and A-Frame, for example, among many others – but we’re standing up official test instances of each of the other candidates shortly, and they’ll be available for open testing soon.

    The trial period for these will last about a month. Once they’re spun up, we’ll be taking feedback in dedicated channels on each of those servers, as well as in #synchronicity on IRC.mozilla.org, and we’ll be creating a forum on Mozilla’s community Discourse instance as well. We’ll have the specifics for you at the same time as those servers will be opened up and, of course you can always email me.

Mozilla to gradually enable DNS-over-HTTPS for Firefox US users

  • Mozilla to gradually enable DNS-over-HTTPS for Firefox US users later this month

    Mozilla plans to enable support for the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol by default inside the Firefox browser for a small number of US users starting later this month.

    The browser maker has been testing DoH support in Firefox since 2017. A recent experiment found no issues, and Mozilla plans to enable DoH in the main Firefox release for a small percentage of users, and then enable it for a broader audience if no issues arise.

    "If this goes well, we will let you know when we're ready for 100% deployment," said Selena Deckelmann, Senior Director of Firefox Engineering at Mozilla.

"Update to Firefox extensions API won't kill ad blockers"

  • Mozilla says update to Firefox extensions API won't kill ad blockers

    Mozilla announced plans today to preserve the API functions that ad blockers and other extensions need to function properly, as part of Firefox's upcoming transition to a superior extensions API.

    This is the same extensions API to which Google announced changes last year, which later proved to be detrimental to ad blockers and a few other extensions types.

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