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Even Microsoft Can't Compete With Linux Forever

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Linux
Interviews

Two major forces of Linux community -- Open Source Developer Labs and Free Standards Group -- have come together to form Linux Foundation. Here is an exclusive interview of Jim Zemlin, executive director of Free Standards Group, with EFYTimes.

ET. What is the primary goal of Linux Foundation?
JZ. Linux Foundation's primary goal is to support the next phase of growth and innovation for Linux. The foundation will support this rapid growth by providing a comprehensive set of services - standardisation, legal protections and promotion - that enable Linux to go head to head with closed platforms.

ET. Will it compete with Microsoft directly? If yes, what is the strategy?

Full Story.

Linux Foundation cynics ask merger or takeover?

So is this a merger or a takeover? Is this simply a matter of consolidating the legal and engineering resources of Linux, or is this a way for big vendors to take command of the open source movement with "one throat to choke," in this case Jim Zemlin, who had been running the FSG?

And is this really progress? The new group says it will have a total of 45 full-time and contract employees. I believe that's less than the two groups had, combined, just a few months ago.

Full Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Linux Foundation to be more like Apache

Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation, says his vision for the group is to make it like Apache, or Mozilla, or Eclipse. The CEA is right out.

And anyone can use the penguin.

So the big story of The Linux Foundation turns out, in a way, to be smaller than it appeared this morning. It's a technical group whose legal and publicity assets belong to the community that sponsors it, and not to any small group of members.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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