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5 Reasons Why Charging Money For Linux Distributions Makes Sense

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Linux

The popularity of Linux has skyrocketed and companies dealing with Linux products/distros are making a lot of money from it. Even though Linux is synonymous with open-source, that concept is eventually moving out of the picture.

While many people believe that Linux distros shouldn’t come with a price, considering the user base and the efficiency it brings, charging money for Linux distro actually makes sense even though many Linux distros come with a user donation option.

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