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Mozilla: DNS, Chrome Web Store and MDN

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox will soon 401 your URL with DNS

    There are no specific rollout details for this feature, though Mozilla says it'll be live for US users by the end of this month. When we'll see it in Blighty? We'll let you know when we do. Mozilla is staging the rollout to bug bash any problems it comes across.

  • State of the art protection in Chrome Web Store

    All of you certainly know already that Google is guarding its Chrome Web Store vigilantly and making sure that no bad apples get in. So when you hit “Report abuse” your report will certainly be read carefully by another human being and acted upon ASAP. Well, eventually… maybe… when it hits the news. If it doesn’t, then it probably wasn’t important anyway and these extensions might stay up despite being taken down by Mozilla three months ago.

    As to your legitimate extensions, these will be occasionally taken down as collateral damage in this fierce fight. Like my extension which was taken down due to missing a screenshot because of not having any user interface whatsoever. It’s not possible to give an advance warning either, like asking the developer to upload a screenshot within a week. This kind of lax policies would only encourage the bad guys to upload more malicious extensions without screenshots of course.

    And the short downtime of a few weeks and a few hours of developer time spent trying to find anybody capable of fixing the problem are surely a small price to pay for a legitimate extension in order to defend the privilege of staying in the exclusive club of Chrome extension developers. So I am actually proud that this time my other browser extension, PfP: Pain-free Passwords, was taken down by Google in its relentless fight against the bad actors.

  • Caniuse and MDN compatibility data collaboration

    Web developers spend a good amount of time making web compatibility decisions. Deciding whether or not to use a web platform feature often depends on its availability in web browsers.

    [...]

    We’ve been asked why the datasets are treated differently. Why didn’t we merge them in the first place? We discussed and considered this option. However, due to the intrinsic differences between our two projects, we decided not to. Here’s why:

    MDN’s support data is very broad and covers feature support at a very granular level. This allows MDN to provide as much detailed information as possible across all web technologies, supplementing the reference information provided by MDN Web Docs.

    Caniuse, on the other hand, often looks at larger features as a whole (e.g. CSS Grid, WebGL, specific file format support). The caniuse approach provides developers with higher level at-a-glance information on whether the feature’s supported. Sometimes detail is missing. Each individual feature is added manually to caniuse, with a primary focus on browser support coverage rather than on feature coverage overall.

    Because of these and other differences in implementation, we don’t plan on merging the source data repositories or matching the data schema at this time. Instead, the integration works by matching the search query to the feature’s description on caniuse.com. Then, caniuse generates an appropriate feature table, and converts MDN support data to the caniuse format on the fly.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Lenovo Launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Lenovo and Canonical launched today personal computers from the ThinkPad and ThinkStation family that come preinstalled with the LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Today, Lenovo is making available for the general public a total of 27 PCs (13 workstations and 14 laptops) from the ThinkPad and ThinkStation family pre-installed with the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, which were previously available only to enterprises via a customized bid. Read more

Open Hardware and Google's Linux-powered Platforms

  • RISC-V: What’s Missing And Who’s Competing

    Arm is definitely one of the competitors. RISC-V is definitely getting a lot of traction in the microcontroller space, and even Arm is trying to make it easier for other companies to adopt that adopt their baseline designs. Arm and ARC are definitely competitors, especially in the IoT embedded space.

  • AMD Launches Chromebook-Optimized Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series Mobile Processors

    After unveiling Athlon 3000-series of 15W mobile processors earlier this year, AMD has now announced Chromebook-optimized mobile processors with AMD Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series family.

  • Android 11 on Android TV Launches for the Big Screen

    Android 11 may have been released for smartphones on September 8th, but Google has just only announced the launch of Android 11 on Android TV for an optimized experience on the big screen. The version of the TV-optimized operating system builds on the many new features introduced for Android 11, but also adds performance and privacy improvements, new features tailored for the TV, and updated developer tools.

Games: Wine, Stadia, Move or Die

  • Easier Vulkan Debugging Of Windows Applications Running Under Wine Is On The Way

    With patches pending it will be easier to debug Windows games/applications running under Wine on Linux. Stemming from a discussion over the ability to forward Vulkan API debugging information to the host loader to receive those calls from the Windows software, there are now Wine patches sent out to make that happen.

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  • The Division 2 on Stadia gets a free weekend for Stadia Pro and more Stadia news

    Seems Google are getting a bit more chatty about Stadia recently. Hot on the heels of announcing another round of new indie games with Stadia Makers, we have another round-up for you. For anyone with Stadia Pro, which is still free for a month when you sign up, you will able to play The Division 2 free from September 24 at 16:00 UTC until September 28 at 16:00 UTC. I actually think The Division 2 is one of the better ports on Stadia, with cross-play with the Windows version and it actually looks quite good.

  • Move or Die hits 1 million sales, free to play until September 24 and huge discount

    Move or Die, probably one of the funniest party games around that supports both local and online play has a hit a huge milestone with 1 million sales. That sales mark is just on Steam, which sounds like a lot but this is spread across quite a few years since it released back in 2016. Fantastic for an indie developer though, and well deserved because it's a genuine delight to play through. Move or Die is an absurdly fast-paced, 4-player local and online party game where the mechanics change every 20 seconds.