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Video/Audio: Kali Linux 2019.3 KDE, Linux Headlines and Python Shows

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Interviews
  • Kali Linux 2019.3 "KDE" overview | The Most Advanced Penetration Testing Distribution, Ever.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Kali Linux 2019.3 "KDE" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Linux Headlines – 09/09/2019

    Manjaro begins a new era, KDE sets goals for future usability, and Mozilla rolls out a controversial feature to Firefox.

    Plus after nearly 10 years, one of our favorite open source projects gets a major feature update.

  • Powered Journalistic Freedom With SecureDrop

    The internet has made it easier than ever to share information, but at the same time it has increased our ability to track that information. In order to ensure that news agencies are able to accept truly anonymous material submissions from whistelblowers, the Freedom of the Press foundation has supported the ongoing development and maintenance of the SecureDrop platform. In this episode core developers of the project explain what it is, how it protects the privacy and identity of journalistic sources, and some of the challenges associated with ensuring its security. This was an interesting look at the amount of effort that is required to avoid tracking in the modern era.

  • Python’s Long Tail | Coder Radio 374

    As Python 2's demise draws near we reflect on Python's popularity, the growing adoption of static typing, and why the Python 3 transition took so long.

    Plus Apple's audacious app store tactics, Google's troubles with Typescript, and more!

More in Tux Machines

Okular 20.08 — redesigned annotation tools

Last year I wrote about some enhancements made to Okular’s annotation tool and in one of those, Simone Gaiarin commented that he was working on redesigning the Annotation toolbar altogether. I was quite interested and was also thinking of ‘modernizing’ the tool — only, I had no idea how much work it would be. The existing annotation tool works, but it had some quirks and had many advanced options which were documented pretty well in the Handbook but not obvious to an unscrupulous user. For instance, if the user would like to highlight some part of the text, she selects (single-clicks) the highlighter tool, applies it to a block of text. When another part of text is to be highlighted, you’d expect the highlighter tool to apply directly; but it didn’t ‘stick’ — tool was unselected after highlighting the first block of text. There is an easy way to make the annotation tool ‘stick’ — instead of single-click to select the tool, simply double-click, and it persists. Another instance is the ‘Strikeout’ annotation which is not displayed by default, but can be added to the tools list. Simone, with lots of inputs, testing and reviews from David Hurka, Nate Graham and Albert Astals Cid et al., has pulled off a magnificent rewrite of Okular’s annotation toolbar. To get an idea of the amount of work went into this, see this phabricator task and this invent code review. The result of many months of hardwork is a truly modern, easy to explore-and-use annotation support. I am not aware of any other libre PDF reader with such good annotation features. Read more

Android Leftovers

Now and Then: The Fate of 7 Promising Free Linux Web Browsers

This is illustrated by the image to the left which depicts the web browser share for visits to LinuxLinks.com for the period covering June – September 2020. But Chrome and Firefox are not for everyone. Chrome is proprietary software so it’s not very appealing to open source enthusiasts. There’s the open source Chromium, of course, but that’s not very popular. And Firefox has been steadily losing market share. Read more

Linux Jargon Buster: What is a Rolling Release Distribution?

After understanding what is Linux, what is a Linux distribution, when you start using Linux, you might come across the term ‘rolling release’ in Linux forum discussions. In this Linux jargon buster, you’ll learn about rolling release model of Linux distributions. In software development, rolling release is a model where updates to a software are continuously rolled out rather than in batches of versions. This way the software always remains up-to-date. A rolling release distribution follows the same model and it provides the latest Linux kernel and the software version as they are released. Read more