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Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 'Juhraya' has been officially released

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Manjaro, the Linux distribution based on Arch has just put out a major new release with Manjaro 18.1.0 - Juhraya.

Something of a controversial decision was the Manjaro team were possibly going to replace the FOSS office suite LibreOffice in favour of the proprietary FreeOffice. After they took on plenty of feedback, they decided to drop that plan. Instead, when installing you now get the choice between the two or no office suite at all. Additionally according to what the Manjaro team said, SoftMaker (the developer), actually expanded FreeOffice to support more Microsoft formats due to the demand from the Manjaro community so thats' quite nice.

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Arch Linux-based Manjaro 18.1.0 'Juhraya' now available

  • Arch Linux-based Manjaro 18.1.0 'Juhraya' now available with GNOME, KDE, or Xfce

    Manjaro may have lofty goals of becoming a successful company, but let's be honest -- users of the Linux-based operating system don't really care about that. Don't get me wrong, I am sure most members of the Linux community are rooting for the newly-formed company's success, but they are probably more interested in the excellent operating system itself.

    Today, Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 "Juhraya" finally becomes available for download, and it isn't without some controversy. You see, rather than just offer up LibreOffice like most distributions, Juhraya offers an alternative choice at installation -- FreeOffice.

Manjaro 18.1 Released With Choice Of Office Suite

  • Manjaro 18.1 Released With Choice Of Office Suite

    Manjaro 18.1 pulls in the latest Arch packages and has various other improvements on its own. One of the most user-facing changes with Manjaro 18.1 comes at installation time where the user now has their choice of office suite: users can continue selecting LibreOffice as what's been the default, go for the free but proprietary FreeOffice, or have no office suite installed. Manjaro's decision to offer the proprietary Freeoffice in its distribution is what caused controversy recently but the developers prefer content with that decision with FreeOffice dealing better with some document formats and features than LibreOffice.

Manjaro Linux 18.1 Is Officially Released

  • Manjaro Linux 18.1 Is Officially Released, And You Have A New Choice To Make

    The headlines continue to roll out for Manjaro (which is now an official company), and this one puts to bed the short-lived controversy surrounding the company’s decision to include the proprietary office suite FreeOffice in Manjaro 18.1. The latest stable version of the Arch-based Linux distribution is available now with a ton of new features, and a new choice to make during installation.

    First let’s highlight the big changes to the distribution itself.

    The standout feature is definitely the integrated FlatPak and Snap package support, which is managed through “bauh” (you may formerly recognize it as “fpakman”). Between the Manjaro repositories, the AUR and now FlatPaks and Snaps, there’s no shortage of available software and that’s certain to be a major draw for a lot of people.

Slashdot comments

Manjaro 18.1 ‘Juhraya’ Released

  • Manjaro 18.1 ‘Juhraya’ Released: A Beginner-friendly Arch Experience

    In response to the same, the Manjaro team clarified that it was an independent decision and no money was exchanged.

    The team also changed their stance by letting the users choose between LibreOffice and FreeOffice during the installation process. As a result of this change, Manjaro 18.1 has become the first version to give users this choice. Now, during the installation itself, you’ll be asked to choose the office suite. Alternatively, you can go without an office suite at all.

>How To Install Manjaro Linux 18.1.0

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