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Meet PineTime: A $25 Linux Smartwatch in Making

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After budget friendly Pine Tab, Pine Phone and Pine Notebook, PINE64 just revealed that it is working on a Linux based smartwatch called PineTime. It should cost around $25 when it is available.
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An Affordable Companion Watch For Your Linux Smartphone

  • [UPDATED] Meet PineTime, A Ridiculously Affordable Companion Watch For Your Linux Smartphone

    Pine64 is on a roll. The company recently launched its $199 PineBook Pro – a quality Linux laptop with all the trimmings (including privacy switches) – and it’s deep in development of the PinePhone. Now the company is breaking into the watch business with #PineTime, an affordable smartwatch companion for your Linux smartphone. How affordable? How does roughly $25 sound?

    Pine64 announced the project via Twitter in a way that defies what we’ve come to expect from crowdfunded projects in the same arena such as the Purism Librem 5: they posted a photo of the actual device (not a render), and they’re not taking pre-orders or any kind of deposit until the device is finished.

    A fair approach, since PineTime is waiting on FreeRTOS or ARM Mbed developers to breathe life into it.

PineTime is a $25 smartwatch companion for Linux smartphones

  • PineTime is a $25 smartwatch companion for Linux smartphones (work-in-progress from Pine64)

    The folks at Pine64 have been selling inexpensive Linux laptops for a few years, and they’re getting ready to launch their first Linux smartphone.

    But the team also has other products in the works, including new single-board computers, a tablet, and a previously unannounced smartwatch/smartphone companion called the PineTime.

    The PineTime i:s interesting for a few reasons. First, it’s expected to be cheap: Pine64 says it’ll sell for around $25.

    Second, it’s designed to run open source software, based on the based on the FreeRTOS kernel. The company describes the PineTime watch as a companion for Linux smartphones… you know, like the company’s upcoming $150 PinePhone.

PineTime is a $25 Smartwatch / Companion for PinePhone Linux...

  • PineTime is a $25 Smartwatch / Companion for PinePhone Linux Phone

    We’ve recently seen Linux smartphones are coming in a few weeks or months, but the $150 PinePhone may not come alone, and soon be joined by a $25 companion, namely PineTime smartwatch.

    That’s what we learned through a tweet by Pine64 explaining the PineTime is a Linux smartphone companion that can run FreeRTOS or Arm Mbed operating systems. It will be a side-project however, and the focus is still on PinePhone and Pinebook Pro, meaning it will take a while depending on the level of community engagement.

PineTime is a $25 Linux Smartwatch, Coming Next Year

  • PineTime is a $25 Linux Smartwatch, Coming Next Year

    Seemingly not content with creating a swathe of single-board computers, a pair of cheap Linux laptops, or the first real Linux tablet with detachable keyboard, the company is turning (some of) its’ attention to wearables.

    Teased on Twitter with more information to follow, the “PineTime” is a Linux powered smartwatch expected to sell for around $25.

PineTime Is A Linux Smartwatch To Work With The Linux Smartphone

  • PineTime Is A Linux Smartwatch To Work With The Linux Smartphone

    Those who are frequent followers of Linux know that the open-source OS-based smartphones are trying to make a stand in a world where Android and iOS are the current dominants. With Librem 5’s release and PinePhone soon to make its official entry, we have news that a Linux smartphone will soon get a companion in the form of a Linux smartwatch.

    As announced by Pine64 via a tweet, it will be adding a Linux-based smartwatch to its portfolio in addition to the PinePhone and the Pinebook Pro. The upcoming Linux smartwatch will be Pine64’s side-project as declared by the company itself.

Pine64 drops first look at its open source Linux smartwatch

  • Pine64 drops first look at its open source Linux smartwatch

    LINUX SMARTPHONES have hardly set the world on fire in the last few years (unless you're Russian). Yes, yes, we know Android is a Linux-based system but it hardly counts - and when Ubuntu can't make it work, who can?

    Nevertheless, plucky little operations like Pine64 have been offering the prospect of Linux laptops for years, and now they plan to bring their own handset too.

    But the really interesting bit is that Pine is also working on its equivalent of WearOS and the first fruits are being previewed in the form of a Linux smartwatch.

    PineTime (almost impossible to say in any voice but Kath & Kim) is set to run ARM Mbed or FreeRTOS and is specifically designed as a companion to Linux smartphones. If only we knew of any companies planning one of those… la la la….

Pine64 Is Making a $25 Linux Smartwatch

Tabloid ZDNet comparing Apple to Linux

  • Apple Watch Series 5, $500, or Linux PineTime smartwatch, $25?

    A new open-source smartwatch is in the works with a planned price of $25.

    [...]

    But the PineTime isn't quite a reality yet. Pine64 said it is still "waiting for some love from developers" and that for now it is a side project, similar to the Pine64 CUBE, an open-source IoT camera.

    Besides Apple, no Android smartphone maker besides perhaps Xiaomi has been able to carve out a dominant position in the smartwatch category.

    The cheapest decent smartwatches today can be found generally for about $40, so Pine64's promise of a smartwatch that looks similar to the Apple Watch for $25 does sound interesting. And it runs on Arm MBed or FreeTOS, a sure selling point for those who want to avoid the mainstream.

    The smartwatch announcement follows Pine64's plans to launch the PinePhone, a follow-up to its cheap Pinebook Pro laptops and its Raspberry Pi rival boards.

PineTime is an incredibly affordable open source LinuxSmartwatch

  • PineTime is an incredibly affordable open source Linux Smartwatch

    Pine64 has revealed in a series of Tweets that is making PineTime, a $25 smartwatch companion for Linux smartphones. This means, for the price of an Apple Watch Series 5 you could get yourself 20 of these!

    The outfit has been churning out single-board computers, notebook computers and smartphones aimed at hobbyists for years. As you can imagine, all of this gear is very inexpensive.

    Pine64 has now revealed it has started a “side-project” aimed at developing a Linux smartwatch called PineTime. The timepiece is interesting not just because of its $25 price-tag.

    The watch’s software will be designed with the assistance of the wider Linux development community. This will probably be built on top of a light FreeRTOS core or Linux-based ARM MBED. This means its final feature-set will largely be dependent on the interest of developers.

Pine64 Teases $25 Linux Smartwatch

  • Pine64 Teases $25 Linux Smartwatch

    While open source enthusiasts still await the year of the Linux desktop, hardware developer Pine64 is advancing the cause of a US$25 Linux-powered smartwatch, dubbed "PineTime."

    The Pine64 community has invited FreeRTOS or ArmMbed developers with an interest in smartwatches to join in its efforts to bring the product to market.

    Pine64, founded in October 2015, is based in California. The company makes inexpensive Linux-based single board ARM computers that cost $15 to $20. It also makes an $89 Linux laptop called "Pinebook," which runs on the Pine A64 board. A few Linux distributions, including KDE Neon, run on Pine A64.

    The company plans to release the PineTab, a 10-inch Linux tablet with a detachable keyboard, priced at $79, before year's end.

Pine64 Teases With $25 PineTime Linux Smartwatch

  • Pine64 Teases With $25 PineTime Linux Smartwatch

    Priced at $25, PineTime is very cheap considering the Apple Watch and others in the market. According to the Twitter announcement thread – PineTime comes with a “nice” charging dock, a heart-rate monitor, and is made from zinc alloy and plastic. It also comes with a battery that lasts several days.

    Current smartwatch market is mostly dominated by Apple and Xiaomi and prices are no match what Pine64 offering. Having said that, PineTime can be a really good deal at $25 price band when available.

    The company also shows off a prototype version of the phone (actual photo) in Twitter which looks pretty cool indeed.

PineTime is Pine64’s upcoming stab at an open source smartwatch

  • PineTime is Pine64’s upcoming stab at an open source smartwatch

    There have been attempts at making and selling source open source-friendly devices, from desktops to tablets to, of course, smartphones. There are even open source and privacy-oriented smart speakers. All that’s missing is a smartwatch, one that’s not just a smartwatch OS slapped in proprietary hardware. Rising to that challenge is Pine64, creators of a line of ARM-powered open source friendly computing products. While it says that PineTime smartwatch is just a side project, interest could catapult it to an actual product in the very near future.

PineTime Smartwatch Specifications Released

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