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Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

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Linux
  • Improve memset
    
    since the merge window is closing in and y'all are on a conference, I
    thought I should take another stab at it. It being something which Ingo,
    Linus and Peter have suggested in the past at least once.
    
  • An Improved Linux MEMSET Is Being Tackled For Possibly Better Performance

    Borislav Petkov has taken to improve the Linux kernel's memset function with it being an area previously criticzed by Linus Torvalds and other prominent developers.

    Petkov this week published his initial patch for better optimizing the memset function that is used for filling memory with a constant byte.

  • Kernel Address Space Isolation Still Baking To Limit Data Leaks From Foreshadow & Co

    In addition to the work being led by DigitalOcean on core scheduling to make Hyper Threading safer in light of security vulnerabilities, IBM and Oracle engineers continue working on Kernel Address Space Isolation to help prevent data leaks during attacks.

    Complementing the "Core Scheduling" work, Kernel Address Space Isolation was also talked about at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The address space isolation work for the kernel was RFC'ed a few months ago as a feature to prevent leaking sensitive data during attacks like L1 Terminal Fault and MDS. The focus on this Kernel ASI is for pairing with hypervisors like KVM as well as being a generic address space isolation framework.

  • The Linux Kernel Is Preparing To Enable 5-Level Paging By Default

    While Intel CPUs aren't shipping with 5-level paging support, they are expected to be soon and distribution kernels are preparing to enable the kernel's functionality for this feature to extend the addressable memory supported. With that, the mainline kernel is also looking at flipping on 5-level paging by default for its default kernel configuration.

    Intel's Linux developers have been working for several years on the 5-level paging support for increasing the virtual/physical address space for supporting large servers with vast amounts of RAM. The 5-level paging increases the virtual address space from 256 TiB to 128 PiB and the physical address space from 64 TiB to 4 PiB. Intel's 5-level paging works by extending the size of virtual addresses to 57 bits from 48 bits.

  • Interview with the Cloud Foundry Foundation CTO

    In this interview, Chip Childers, the CTO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation talks about some hot topics.

  • Research Shows Open Source Program Offices Improve Software Practices

    Using open source software is commonplace, with only a minority of companies preferring a proprietary-first software policy. Proponents of free and open source software (FOSS) have moved to the next phases of open source adoption, widening FOSS usage within the enterprise as well as gaining the “digital transformation” benefits associated with open source and cloud native best practices.

    Companies, as well as FOSS advocates, are determining the best ways to promote these business goals, while at the same time keeping alive the spirit and ethos of the non-commercial communities that have embodied the open source movement for years.

  • Linux Foundation Survey Proves Open-Source Offices Work Better

More Cloud Foundry Interviews

Abby Kearns

More Kubernetes (or Similar) Interviews

Abby Kearns Interview At Cloud Foundry Summit, 2019

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