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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • post modern C tooling - draft

    Some of the C++ people have pulled off one of the cleverest and sneakiest tricks ever. They required 'modern' C99 and C11 features in 'recent' C++ standards. Microsoft has famously still clung onto some 80s version of C with their compiler for the longest time. So it's been a decade of hacks for people writing portable code in C. For a while I thought we'd be stuck in the 80s with C89 forever. However, now that some C99 and C11 features are more widely available in the Microsoft compiler, we can use these features in highly portable code (but forget about C17/C18 ISO/IEC 9899:2018/C2X stuff!!).

  • Reading and Writing YAML to a File in Python

    In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to use the YAML library in Python 3. YAML stands for Yet Another Markup Language.

    In recent years it has become very popular for its use in storing data in a serialized manner for configuration files. Since YAML essentially is a data format, the YAML library is quite brief, as the only functionality required of it is the ability to parse YAML formatted files.

    In this article we will start with seeing how data is stored in a YAML file, followed by loading that data into a Python object. Lastly, we will learn how to store a Python object in a YAML file. So, let's begin.

    Before we move further, there are a few prerequisites for this tutorial. You should have a basic understanding of Python's syntax, and/or have done at least beginner level programming experience with some other language. Other than that, the tutorial is quite simple and easy to follow for beginners.

  • Python Multiple Inheritance (with Examples)

    In this tutorial, we’ll describe Python Multiple Inheritance concept and explain how to use it in your programs. We’ll also cover multilevel inheritance, the super() function, and focus on the method resolution order.

    In the previous tutorial, we have gone through Python Class and Python (Single) Inheritance. There, you have seen that a child class inherits from a base class. However, Multiple Inheritance is a feature where a class can derive attributes and methods from more than one base classes. Hence, it creates a high level of complexity and ambiguity and known as the diamond problem in the technical world. We’ll be taking up this problem later in this tutorial.

  • Adding Methods Retroactively

    Imagine you have a "shapes" library. We have a Circle class, a Square class, etc.

    A Circle has a radius, a Square has a side, and maybe Rectangle has height and width. The library already exists: we do not want to change it.

    However, we do want to add an area calculation. If this was our library, we would just add an area method, so that we can call shape.area(), and not worry about what the shape is.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Fu: Python GUIs For Command Line Programs (Almost) Instantly

Not every programmer likes creating GUI code. Most hacker types don’t mind a command line interface, but very few ordinary users appreciate them. However, if you write command line programs in Python, Gooey can help. By leveraging some Python features and a common Python idiom, you can convert a command line program into a GUI with very little effort. The idea is pretty simple. Nearly all command line Python programs use argparse to simplify picking options and arguments off the command line as well as providing some help. The Gooey decorator picks up all your options and arguments and creates a GUI for it. You can make it more complicated if you want to change specific things, but if you are happy with the defaults, there’s not much else to it. At first, this article might seem like a Python Fu and not a Linux Fu, since — at first — we are going to focus on Python. But just stand by and you’ll see how this can do a lot of things on many operating systems, including Linux. Read more Also: Applying C - Running Programs With Systemd

today's howtos

Compilers Leftovers

  • LLVM "Stack Clash" Compiler Protection Is Under Review

    Two years after the "Stack Clash" vulnerability came to light, the LLVM compiler is working on adding protection against it similar to the GCC compiler mitigation. The Stack Clash vulnerability pertains to clashing/smashing another program's stack while circumventing existing stack protections at the time. Stack Clash opens up the door to memory corruption and arbitrary code execution. Linux x86/x86_64 wasn't the only one affected but also the BSDs and Solaris. Those unfamiliar with it or wanting to refresh your memory of it can do so via this Qualys blog post with the firm having discovered this vulnerability.

  • pocl v1.4 released

    Please note that there's an official pocl maintenance policy in place. This text describes the policy and how you can get your favourite project that uses OpenCL to remain regression free in the future pocl releases.

  • POCL 1.4 Released For Advancing OpenCL On CPUs - Now Supports LLVM 9.0

    Version 1.4 has been released of POCL, the "Portable Computing Language" implementation that allows for a portable OpenCL implementation to be executed on CPUs as well as optionally targeting other accelerators via HSA or even CUDA devices. POCL 1.4 brings support for LLVM Clang 9.0, with that open-source compiler stack doing a lot of POCL's heavy lifting. Support meanwhile for pre-6.0 LLVM releases were removed. POCL 1.4 also adds support for building relocatable POCL binaries and improves SPIR/SPIR-V support for CPU devices.

starship – elegant cross-shell prompt at your fingertips

The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. And if you ever want to harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended to master it. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources. For anyone spending time at the CLI, they’ll rely on the shell prompt. I always seem to gravitate back to Bash even though I’ve used more than a dozen shells over the years. By default, the configuration for Bash on popular distributions identifies the user name, hostname, and the current working directory. I recently reviewed Liquid Prompt, an intelligent and non-intrusive prompt for Bash and zsh. starship is an alternative to Liquid Prompt. The software aims to show information you need while you’re working, yet being unobtrusive as possible. Read more