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Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

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OS

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts.

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Oracle announces Oracle Autonomous Linux

  • Oracle announces Oracle Autonomous Linux

    Oracle on Monday announced Oracle Autonomous Linux, an autonomous operating system. Autonomous Linux provisions itself, scales itself, tunes itself and patches itself while running.

    "Autonomy is the defining technology of a second generation cloud," Oracle co-founder and CTO Larry Ellison said in his keynote address at the Oracle OpenWorld conference in San Francisco. Two years ago, Oracle introduced the Autonomous Database . The company's ultimate goal, he said, is to build "the world's first complete and truly autonomous cloud."

Oracle Built a Raspberry Pi Super Computer

  • Oracle Built a Raspberry Pi Super Computer That Looks like a TARDIS

    Oracle think so, as it’s is showing off a super computer it’s built — baked? — from 1024 Raspberry Pi’s, 49 custom printed Pi holders, 22 network switches, 18 USB power supplies, and lots and lots of wiring.

    And just to ram home the “big things often come in small packages” mantra fully the chassis housing the cluster apes the TARDIS, the trans-dimensional time machine piloted by the titular character in British Sci-Fi series ‘Doctor Who’.

    The Pi-packed machine is running Oracle Autonomous Linux and Java (naturally). It’s currently being put to use advancing scientific understanding rendering selfies at the Oracle OpenWorld event happening in San Francisco, USA between September 16-19.

Oracle woos Red Hat users with Autonomous Linux

  • Oracle woos Red Hat users with Autonomous Linux

    Sending a shot across the bow to rival Red Hat, Oracle has introduced Oracle Autonomous Linux, an “autonomous operating system” in the Oracle Cloud that is designed to eliminate manual OS management and human error. Oracle Autonomous Linux is patched, updated, and tuned without human interaction.

    The Oracle Autonomous Linux service is paired with the new Oracle OS Management Service, which is a cloud infrastructure component providing control over systems running Autonomous Linux, Linux, or Windows. Binary compatibility is offered for IBM Red Hat Enterprise Linux, providing for application compatibility on Oracle Cloud infrastructure.

Wim Coekaerts Interview At Oracle OpenWorld

Oracle Autonomous Linux: World's first autonomous OS

  • Oracle Autonomous Linux: World's first autonomous operating system announced

    Oracle has announced its free autonomous operating system — Oracle Autonomous Linux — which provisions itself, scales itself, tunes itself and patches itself while running.

    Autonomous Linux is based on Oracle Linux, which powers Oracle Cloud and Oracle Engineered Systems.

    Additionally, Oracle promises "literally instantaneous migration" to the new operating system. The OS is free for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure customers.

Press release and more coverage

  • Oracle Ups the Ante in Cloud with World's First Autonomous Operating System

    Keeping systems patched and secure is one of the biggest ongoing challenges faced by IT today. Tasks can be tedious and error prone, and extremely difficult to manage in large-scale cloud environments. With Oracle Autonomous Linux, customers can rely on autonomous capabilities to help ensure their systems are secure and highly available to help prevent cyberattacks.

    "Oracle Autonomous Linux builds on Oracle's proven history of delivering Linux with extreme performance, reliability, and security to run the most demanding enterprise applications," said Wim Coekaerts, senior vice president of operating systems and virtualization engineering, Oracle. "Today we are taking the next step in our autonomous strategy with Oracle Autonomous Linux, providing a rich set of capabilities to help our customers significantly improve reliability and protect their systems from cyberthreats."

  • "Autonomous Linux" Operating System in the Cloud Extends Oracle's Autonomous Strategy

    Marking what it describes as a milestone in its autonomous strategy, Oracle announced its Autonomous Linux, which, the company said, along with its new OS Management Service, provides an autonomous operating environment that eliminates complexity and human error to enable cost savings, security, and availability for customers.

    The Oracle Autonomous Linux is targeted at the IT challenge of keeping systems patched and secure, which can be tedious, error-prone, and difficult to manage in large-scale cloud environments. With Oracle Autonomous Linux, customers can rely on autonomous capabilities to help ensure their systems are secure and highly available to help prevent cyberattacks.

Oracle Autonomous Linux is 'world's first' autonomous operating

  • Oracle Autonomous Linux is 'world's first' autonomous operating system

    ORACLE HAS SHOWN OFF Oracle Autonomous Linux, an autonomous operating system that requires no human supervision to run.

    The operating system was unveiled this week by Larry Ellison, Oracle co-founder and chief technology officer, at the firm's OpenWorld conference in San Francisco, and is - according to the company -the world's first autonomous operating system capable of tuning and patching itself while running.

    Ellison said the new operating system will help customers achieve extreme performance, high reliability and security.

Oracle and Wim Coekaerts Interviews

Oracle Autonomous Linux – ‘world’s first’ autonomous OS

  • Oracle Autonomous Linux – ‘world’s first’ autonomous OS announced

    Oracle has announced its world’s first autonomous operating system which provisions itself, scales itself, tunes itself and patches itself while running. Autonomous Linux powers Oracle Cloud and Oracle Engineered Systems as it is based on Oracle Linux.

    “Autonomy is the defining technology of a second-generation cloud,” Oracle co-founder and CTO Larry Ellison contended in his keynote while addressing at the Oracle OpenWorld conference in San Francisco. He further added any Red Hat application would run unchanged on Oracle Autonomous Linux.

Oracle Autonomous Linux: A Self Updating

  • Oracle Autonomous Linux: A Self Updating, Self Patching Linux Distribution for Cloud Computing

    Automation is the growing trend in the IT industry. The aim is to remove the manual interference from the repetitive tasks. Oracle has taken another step into the automation world by launching Oracle Autonomous Linux that is surely going to benefit the IoT and CLoud Computing industry.

    [...]

    The biggest feature that Oracle Autonomous Linux is reduced maintenance costs. According to Oracle’s site, Autonomous Linux “uses advanced machine learning and autonomous capabilities to deliver unprecedented cost savings, security, and availability and frees up critical IT resources to tackle more strategic initiatives”.

    Autonomous Linux can install updates and patches without human interference. These automatic updates include patches for the “Linux kernel and key user space libraries”. “This requires no downtime along with protection from both external attacks and malicious internal users.” They can also take place while the system is running to reduce downtime. Autonomous Linux also handles scaling automatically to ensure that all computing needs are handled.

    Ellison highlighted how the new autonomous would improve security. He mentioned in particular how Capitol One data breach occurred because of a bad configuration. He said “One simple rule to prevent data theft: Put your data in an autonomous system. No human error, no data loss. That’s the big difference between us and AWS.”

5 Key Takeaways from Oracle OpenWorld 2019

  • 5 Key Takeaways from Oracle OpenWorld 2019

    2. Autonomous Linux OS

    Oracle has extended the promise of the autonomous database to its flagship Linux operating system. The company claims that Oracle Autonomous Linux, along with the new Oracle OS Management Service, is the first and only autonomous operating environment that helps greatly reduce complexity and human error to deliver increased cost savings, security, and availability for customers.

    Autonomous Linux is based on Oracle Linux, an OS that’s binary-compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, which allows Red Hat customers to easily port applications to Oracle Cloud.

    The new Linux OS from Oracle automates patching and upgrades even while the system is running. This automation reduces unnecessary and costly downtime to applications. Since it reduces human errors, it achieves higher availability and an increased system and application reliability.

    Oracle has also introduced Oracle OS Management Service, a highly available Oracle Cloud Infrastructure service that enables customers to automate server management.

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