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  • Linux Foundation Hosting Open Source Project on UAS Interoperability

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit technology consortium, plans to host the InterUSS Platform Open Source Project, which is designed to enable “trusted, secure and scalable” interoperability among unmanned aircraft system (UAS) service suppliers (USSs) to advance “safe, equitable and efficient” drone operations, the foundation has announced.

    Initial contributors include both industry and regulatory organizations: Wing, AirMap, Uber and the Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation.

    Similar to the evolution of cities, our skies are becoming busier with traffic, the Linux Foundation explains. In an effort to unleash innovation and ensure safety, aviation regulators around the world are implementing UAS traffic management to support increasing and diverse drone operations. Under UTM, a set of USSs (also known as U-Space Service Providers, or USPs) assists drone operators with conducting safe and compliant operations.

  • #CFSummit2019: Open Source Community Witnesses High-Velocity Of Change

    This time last week, The Hague, The Netherlands welcomed over 700 people all attending the 2019 European Cloud Foundry Summit.

    While last year, the theme was very much tailored around pushing enterprise-ready platform-as-a-service portfolio, as it continues to strike closer relationships with the world’s biggest cloud service providers, but this year, the summit took a more forward-thinking approach with its ‘Building the Future’ theme.

  • CEDIA 2019: Home Assistant Is an Open-Source Home Automation Platform, Uses Raspberry Pi
  • Homura Is A Windows Game Launcher For FreeBSD - Supports Steam, Origin, UPlay + More

    While FreeBSD doesn't see much in the way of game ports besides compatibility with open-source games/engines, FreeBSD's Linux binary compatibility layer for years has allowed running Linux games on FreeBSD and there is also Wine support for FreeBSD to handle Windows software. Thanks to those efforts, it's possible to make a FreeBSD gaming box.

    Homura is a newer open-source project focused on providing a Windows game launcher for FreeBSD systems. Homura is akin to CrossOver or Lutris and wraps around Wine/WineTricks and makes it easy to deploy various Windows games and gaming services under FreeBSD.

  • The Hardware FOSDEM Uses To Carry Out Linux Video Recordings Of Their Event

    Not only is FOSDEM one of the best open-source/Linux events in the world for those who make the journey each February to Brussels, but they also for years now have done a masterful job at recording the different talks and developer room sessions. Each year gets better both for the event itself as well as the video recordings even with FOSDEM operating on a very limited budget due to the event being free to attend. For those curious about the hardware/software setup powering their video setup, here's an interesting blog post.

  • Matplotlib titles have configurable locations – and you can have more than one at once!

    Just a quick post here to let you know about a matplotlib feature I've only just found out about.

  • Microsoft Operating Systems BlueKeep Vulnerability

    BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708) exists within the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) used by the Microsoft Windows OSs listed above. An attacker can exploit this vulnerability to perform remote code execution on an unprotected system.

    According to Microsoft, an attacker can send specially crafted packets to one of these operating systems that has RDP enabled.[1] After successfully sending the packets, the attacker would have the ability to perform a number of actions: adding accounts with full user rights; viewing, changing, or deleting data; or installing programs. This exploit, which requires no user interaction, must occur before authentication to be successful.

More in Tux Machines

Get to know Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

Linux Virtualization Manager can manage multiple on-premises hosts running Oracle Linux KVM. Oracle enhanced Linux KVM in the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 5, an OS kernel tested and optimized for Oracle Linux 7 Update 5. Because Linux KVM is the same hypervisor used for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, admins have an easy migration path from the Linux Virtualization Manager environment to the Oracle Cloud platform. Linux Virtualization Manager also supports importing and exporting software appliances based on the Open Virtualization Format and Open Virtualization Archive standards. Oracle based Linux Virtualization Manager on the oVirt project, an open source virtualization platform developed by Red Hat. Linux Virtualization Manager relies on the oVirt engine for discovering KVM hosts and configuring storage and network resources. The platform supports KVM administration for multinode environments, offering a large-scale, centralized management platform for server and desktop virtualization. Read more

Python 3.8 Released

  • Python 3.8.0

    Python 3.8.0 is the newest major release of the Python programming language, and it contains many new features and optimizations.

  • Cool New Features in Python 3.8

    The newest version of Python is released today! Python 3.8 has been available in beta versions since the summer, but on October 14th, 2019 the first official version is ready. Now, we can all start playing with the new features and benefit from the latest improvements. What does Python 3.8 bring to the table? The documentation gives a good overview of the new features. However, this article will go more in depth on some of the biggest changes, and show you how you can take advantage of Python 3.8.

Linux Fu: Python GUIs For Command Line Programs (Almost) Instantly

Not every programmer likes creating GUI code. Most hacker types don’t mind a command line interface, but very few ordinary users appreciate them. However, if you write command line programs in Python, Gooey can help. By leveraging some Python features and a common Python idiom, you can convert a command line program into a GUI with very little effort. The idea is pretty simple. Nearly all command line Python programs use argparse to simplify picking options and arguments off the command line as well as providing some help. The Gooey decorator picks up all your options and arguments and creates a GUI for it. You can make it more complicated if you want to change specific things, but if you are happy with the defaults, there’s not much else to it. At first, this article might seem like a Python Fu and not a Linux Fu, since — at first — we are going to focus on Python. But just stand by and you’ll see how this can do a lot of things on many operating systems, including Linux. Read more Also: Applying C - Running Programs With Systemd

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