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Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support, Stratix10 Additions & Other Material Hits Linux 5.4

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Linux

The "char/misc" changes for the Linux 5.4 are as eventful as ever.

Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in the char/misc changes earlier this week for the Linux 5.4 merge window that's now half-way through. The since merged material contains a lot of notable hardware support improvements.

Exciting us the most is that the Intel Icelake Thunderbolt support is now squared away. Intel had most of the Icelake CPU support in good shape going back months including for the Gen11 graphics, but the Thunderbolt support was the last holdout. With Icelake, the Thunderbolt controller has moved onto the CPU package itself sans the power deliver infrastructure. These changes yielded additional work to get Icelake Thunderbolt support going under Linux, but it's finally there for Linux 5.4 with Icelake laptops beginning to hit retail channels.

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