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Fast Linux Application Launcher Ulauncher 5.3.0 Stable Released

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Software

Ulauncher is an open source application launcher for Linux that can be extended to perform various other tasks through addons. The application features fuzzy search, custom color themes, and it can browse through system directories. Under the hood, Ulauncher uses Python with GTK for the launcher user interface, and HTML/JS rendered in a Webkit frame for the preferences window.

Open it using a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl + Space by default), then type a few letters of your search query, use the Up / Down arrows to navigate through the results, and press the Enter key to launch the selected item. The Ulauncher window will close as soon as you press Enter. You may also launch an item using Alt + 1 for the first item in the Ulauncher list, Alt + 2 for the second, and so on. Don't worry if you have a typo - thanks to Ulauncher's fuzzy search, the application will figure out what you meant in most cases. Also, the launcher remembers your previous choices, automatically selecting them in the future.

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Ulauncher 5.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

  • Ulauncher 5.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

    A new stable version of the Linux application launcher ULauncher is available to download.

    Ulauncher made our list of the best app launchers for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions thanks to its lightning fast responsiveness and wide range of plugins.

    Ulauncher 5.3.0 is the first stable release in the 5.x series and the first version to fully support Python 3.

    Because of this vital foundational change Ulauncher 5.3.0 is not compatible with plugins built for the 4.x series (and the v1 API) — something you should keep in mind if you plan on upgrading from an older version of the app.

    Thankfully, many of the most popular Ulauncher plugins have been ported over to use the new v2 API and work just as well as before. Do check the list prior to upgrading to make sure any add-ons you rely on for Ultimate Productivity™ are available.

How to Install Fast App Launcher ‘Ulauncher’ in Ubuntu 18.04

Ulauncher: Use An Alternative App Launcher In Your Ubuntu/Linux

  • Ulauncher: Use An Alternative App Launcher In Your Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    You might have used several type of launchers or maybe currently using your desktop's default laucher/menu to launch application. If you want to try something new and different on your Linux then we present you ULauncher. It is simple and fast application launcher designed to use on Linux desktop written in Python programming language.
    Ulauncher consumes very few system resources and has ability to run on almost every desktop environment such as: Gnome Shell, Gnome classic, Mate, Xfce, Lxde, Cinnamon, Openbox and so on.
    Using Ulauncher you can search for applications on your system and you can also send search queries to Google, Wikipedia and Stack Overflow. Moreover, there are plenty of extensions available for Ulauncher which can be found on official website.

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