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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3.2

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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3.2, the second minor release of the LibreOffice 6.3 family, with many bug and regression fixes. LibreOffice 6.3.2 “fresh” is targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users, who are suggested to update their current version.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

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LibreOffice 6.3.2 Open-Source Office Suite Released

  • LibreOffice 6.3.2 Open-Source Office Suite Released with 49 Bug Fixes

    The Document Foundation has announced the general availability of the second maintenance update to the latest LibreOffice 6.3 open-source and cross-platform office suite series.

    Coming three weeks after the first point release, LibreOffice 6.3.2 is here to address a total of 49 bugs and regressions across various of its core components, including Writer, Draw, Math, Calc, and Impress. The goal is to make the LibreOffice 6.3 office suite series more stable and reliable until it is ready for enterprise deployments, which is supported until May 29, 2020.

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