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Standards/Consortia Leftovers

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Web
  • The Decentralized Web Is Coming

    The goal is to build a better, more decentralized web.

    "There are so many different possible ways of decentralizing the internet, and what's lacking is the legal right to interoperate and the legal support to stop dirty tricks from preventing you from exercising that legal right," says Cory Doctorow, a science fiction author and tech journalist who's been thinking and writing about the web since Tim Berners-Lee introduced it to the public in the early 1990s.

    Berners-Lee and other web pioneers intended for their creation to be decentralized and open-source. "The cyber-utopian view was not merely that seizing the means of information would make you free, but that failing to do so would put you in perpetual chains," says Doctorow.

    There are many theories about why the web became centralized. Doctorow largely blames the abuse of intellectual property law to defeat the decentralized "free software" movement championed by the programmer and activist Richard Stallman. Stallman helped create the popular open-source operating system Linux after freely modifying Unix, Bell Labs' proprietary system.

    But the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, passed in 1998, became an impediment to the open and permissionless approach to software development. The law was intended to prevent duplication of copryrighted works and was eventually applied to all software. Breaking "digital locks" to learn from, interact with, and improve upon the code of dominant web platforms became a federal crime. It's standard practice for today's tech companies to shield their proprietary code from would-be competitors by wielding the power of an increasingly expansive intellectual property regime.

  • Open source version of OPC UA spec for M2M launches

    OSADL announced OPC Foundation certification of its open source, C-developed “open62541” v1.0 implementation of the TSN-enabled OPC UA standard for M2M Ethernet communications. Kalycito has launched an open62541 starter kit that runs on a Linux-ready TQ gateway.

    You may have noticed an increase in products on LinuxGizmos that support Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN), which is built into some new networking SoCs such as NXP’s Cortex-A72 based LS1028A. More recently we’ve seen products that claim to support the OPC Foundation’s TSN-enabled Open Platform Communications Unified Architecture (OPC UA), such as Advantech’s new WISE-710 gateway.

  • HTTP 1, 2, and 3 in a Nutshell

More in Tux Machines

Open source technology, enabling innovation

One of the most exciting projects to come out of the open source revolution is Kubernetes, a tool helping companies running their software on cloud services. It enables them to get the most out of the processing power they’re paying for by identifying machines that are being underutilised. So, if the software detects that a machine is not being optimised, it will load it up with another task so it’s working as hard as it can. Read more

Forbes Raves Upcoming Linux Desktop will enclose Windows 10 and macOS

Forbes senior employee Jason Evangelho dedicated an entire article to an upcoming update for a Sino-domestic Linux distribution: If you haven't paid attention to a bit of Linux desktop distribution called Deepin, it's time to put it on your radar. Remember that Huawei Deepin chose to ship on their MateBook laptop lineup. Remember that Deepin Cloud Sync (for system settings) is a great, progressive feature that every Linux distro must use. Remember that the retractable control center from the future looks like something sexy and sensible. But looking at 2020, Deepin is absolutely breathtaking. This is without a doubt the nicest desktop environment I have ever seen … For me, the UX is more intuitive and pleasant than macOS and Windows 10. And luckily a quick setting can also transform Deepin into the traditional Windows or macOS desktop paradigm's that you are already familiar with. Hell, even the installer is a relief. Read more Also: Differences between Windows and Linux operating systems. The fundamental differences that are worth knowing

[libre-riscv-dev] power pc

So as you know, the RISCV Foundation is seriously impeding progress. There
is huge momentum around RISCV itself, however as far as open *innovation*
is concerned, the sheer arrogance of the Foundation in failing to respect
the combination of Libre goals and business objectives has us completely
isolated from key critical resources such as the closed secret lists and
wiki.

We cannot even get access to documentation explaining how to propose new
extensions.

I have been considering for some time to reach out to MIPS and PowerPC.
Yesterday I wrote to the OpenPower Foundation and was really surprised and
delighted to hear back from Hugh Blemings, whom I worked with over 20 years
ago.

I outlined some conditions (no NDAs, open mailing lists, use of
Certification Marks and Compliance Suites) and he replied back that this
was pretty much along the lines of what they were planning.

I will have a chat with him some time, in the meantime I found the spec:

https://openpowerfoundation.org/?resource_lib=power-isa-version-3-0

It is eeenooormous, however Hugh reassures me that they want to break it
into sections.

Why would we even consider this?

The lesson from RISCV is really clear: if the ISA is set up as a cartel,
Libre innovation is not welcome.

If we had a goal to just *implement* a *pre existing* Extension, there
would be no problem.

It is the fact that we wish to implement entirely new extensions, for CPU
and GPU *and* VPU purposes, but not as a separate processor (which would be
classified as "custom") that is the "problem".

So starting at page 1146, we need to work out how to shoe horn a ton of
stuff into the ISA, as well as fit 16 bit compressed in as well.

L.
Read more Also: Libre RISC-V Open-Source Effort Now Looking At POWER Instead Of RISC-V

Calamares grabs onto things

I’ve been working on Calamares, the Universal Linux Installer, for a little over two years – following up in the role Teo started. It’s used by Neon (for the dev version, not the user version) and Manjaro and lots of other Linux distributions. I’ve typically called it an installer for boutique distro’s, as opposed to the Big Five. Well, Debian 11 has plans. And lubuntu uses it as well (and has for over six months). Those seem pretty big. Read more