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Programming: Java, Python and Compilers

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  • Another Update on Oracle Java and Oracle Solaris

    Since our last update on Oracle Solaris and Oracle Java we've been getting more questions, so we wanted to write a quick blog to share the latest on this topic.

    There are a lot of applications out there running on Oracle Java SE 8 and Oracle Java SE 11, these are mature and widely adopted platforms. As you can see on the Oracle Java SE Support Roadmap, Oracle is committed to supporting these releases until at least 2025 and 2026 respectively.

    In addition, this page notes:

    "Oracle Java SE product dates are provided as examples to illustrate the support policies. Customers should refer to the Oracle Lifetime Support Policy for the most up-to-date information. Timelines may differ for Oracle Products with a Java SE dependency"

    This is important given the Oracle Applications Unlimited commitment. This essentially says that if you are running on-premise applications covered under Oracle Applications Unlimited (see the list included here), Oracle is committed to offering Oracle Premier support until at least 2030, and that includes the Oracle Java SE releases used by these applications, even if the Oracle Java SE support timelines appear shorter.

  • Oracle Reaffirms Supporting Solaris 11 Through Part Of The Next Decade

    Oracle has reaffirmed their "long term commitment to deliver innovation on Oracle Solaris" though it still doesn't look like anything past Solaris 11 will materialize.

    Solaris 11 is eight years old and while Oracle has made incremental improvements to it, there still is no signs of Solaris 12 or "Solaris-Next" as some previous road-maps had referenced. Oracle on Friday reaffirmed their commitment to supporting Solaris 11 through 2031~2034 depending upon the support agreement.

  • Segfault with custom events in wxPython

    When working on porting Timeline to Python 3, I ran into a problem where a test caused a segfault. I managed to create a small example that reproduces the failure. I describe the example below and show how I solved the test failure.

  • 101 Data Science Interview Questions, Answers, and Key Concepts

    In October 2012, the Harvard Business Review described “Data Scientist” as the “sexiest” job of the 21st century. Well, as we approach 2020 the description still holds true! The world needs more data scientists than there are available for hire. All companies - from the smallest to the biggest - want to hire for a job role that has something “Data” in its name: “Data Scientists”, “Data Analysts”, “Data Engineers” etc.

    On the other hand, there's large number of people who are trying to get a break in the Data Science industry, including people with considerable experience in other functional domains such as marketing, finance, insurance, and software engineering. You might have already invested in learning data science (maybe even at a data science bootcamp), but how confident are you for your next Data Science interview?

    This blog is intended to give you a nice tour of the questions asked in a Data Science interview. After thorough research, we have compiled a list of 101 actual data science interview questions that have been asked between 2016-2019 at some of the largest recruiters in the data science industry – Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Netflix, Expedia, etc.

  • Test and Code: 89: Improving Programming Education - Nicholas Tollervey

    Nicholas Tollervey is working toward better ways of teaching programming. His projects include the Mu Editor, PyperCard, and CodeGrades. Many of us talk about problems with software education. Nicholas is doing something about it.

  • What's your favorite compiler?

    Everyone has a favorite tool for any given job. For programmers, the building process is often a relatively brief job in their workflow, but it's the one that really matters. After all, without compiled code, there's nothing to distribute to users. And different compilers have different features and—whether or not there's a bug about it—quirks. Compilers matter.

    A compiler's never just a compiler, though. When you decide upon a compiler, you're usually committing to a whole toolchain. There's always flexibility in open source, but if you want to take advantage of what a compiler offers, it's usually best to use the kind of workflow that its maintainers and developers expect. That means using Autotools with GCC, or Ant with Javac, and so on.

    Finally, investing in a compiler often means joining the community around that compiler, whether it's just to get alerts about updates or to actively socialize with other users. A compiler without a community is like a tool without a shed: it still works for what it was designed to do, but sometimes it gets rained on or misplaced.

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today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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